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Supreme Court

The Takeaway

Thousands of Elena Kagan's Emails Released to Public

Monday, June 21, 2010

On Friday, thousands of emails written by Supreme Court Justice nominee Elena Kagan were released by the William J. Clinton Presidential Library. Observers of the court from both sides of the aisle spent the weekend scrutinizing the new documents, searching for clues about her legal history. 

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The Takeaway

What Should a Supreme Court Nominee Read?

Friday, May 14, 2010

As Elena Kagan prepares for her confirmation hearings, we are wondering: What should she read? Essence Magazine senior editor Patrik Henry Bass came up with some suggested reading for the nominee as she awaits her confirmation hearings.

Do you have recommended reading for her? Share your suggested book list in the comments.

Here's Patrik's list:

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Kagan Draws Crowds on the Capitol, Canadiens upset the Penguins in NHL Playoffs

Thursday, May 13, 2010

  • WASHINGTON TAKEOUT: Elena Kagan paid her first visit to Congress as Barack Obama's nominee to the Supreme Court yesterday. She met with some of the Senators who will help decide her fate. Takeaway Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich tells us about this "senatorial version of speed dating."
  • SPORTS TAKEOUT: Ibrahim Abdul Matin recaps an exciting game seven upset in the NHL conference semifinals last night, when the Montreal Canadiens upset the Pittsburgh Penguins to continue their Cinderella streak through the playoffs.

(You can follow Todd on Twitter @Todd_Zwillich)

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The Takeaway

Glimpses Into the Life of Supreme Court Nominee Elena Kagan

Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan has carefully guarded her professional and personal lives, especially since being nominated for the Supreme Court earlier this week. To get a fuller picture of the woman who could become one of the nine justices, we talk with two people who knew her as a colleague, a teacher, and a baseball fan, during her time at the University of Chicago Law School from 1991 - 1995.

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The Takeaway

Kagan Faces Scrutiny from Right and Left

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

It's only been a day since President Barack Obama nominated Elena Kagan to succeed retiring Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, but political forces on both sides of the aisle have already begun to scrutinize the nominee. Takeaway Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich explains what we can expect to hear from both sides as the confirmation hearings get underway and helps detangle the legitimate concerns from the political rhetoric.

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The Takeaway

How Elena Kagan Would Change the Supreme Court's Diversity Makeup

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

President Obama announced yesterday his nomination of Elena Kagan to the Supreme Court. If confirmed, Kagan would be the third woman and the third Jew — the highest number ever of either group — to sit in the high court. She would also become the court's fourth New Yorker. And for the first time in history, there would be no Protestant justice.

But how much do all of these diversity numbers matter? What attribute is most important for a Supreme Court justice?

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Legislative Answers to Oil Spill Crisis, Dow Jones' Drop, first 'Warrior Games'

Monday, May 10, 2010

We take a look at what's ahead this week, with Marcus Mabry, associate national editor of The New York Times, and Derrick Ashong, host of "The Derrick Ashong Experience" on Sirius XM's Oprah Radio.

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court to Consider Privacy for Ballot Petition Signers

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

The Supreme Court hears a case today seeking to determine if the free speech rights of people who sign a ballot petition are violated if those names and addresses are publicly disclosed. In the case of Doe v. Reed, people who signed a ballot petition to end same-sex domestic partnerships argue they will be subject to harassment and retaliation if the state allows their personal information to be disclosed. Today's case is just one of several the Supreme Court is hearing regarding the constitutional scope of free speech and the First Amendment.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: The Limits of Free Speech, This Morning's Headlines

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

Gay rights opponents in Washington state want to protect the anonymity of anyone who signs a petition in their favor. The case goes to the Supreme Court today. Slate's senior legal correspondent, Dahlia Lithwick, fills us in.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: FDA Cutting Down Salt; Supreme Court On Animal Cruelty Videos

Wednesday, April 21, 2010

  • NUTRITION TAKEOUT: The average American consumes about 1,200 milligrams more sodium a day than they should. Too much sodium in our diets could lead to hypertension and heart disease. To combat this, the FDA is proposing a ten year plan to cut down the amount of salt in our foods. Marion Nestle, an NYU nutritionist and author of "Safe Food: The Politics of Food Safety," has the details of the FDA's plan and tells us whether it might work.
  • LEGAL TAKEOUT: The Supreme Court invalidated a federal law that banned videos depicting violence against animals, in an 8-1 decision yesterday. Columbia University law professor Nate Persily looks into why the Court ruled they way it did.

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court to Consider Discriminatory Student Group at Public University

Monday, April 19, 2010

Can a public university deny funding to a Christian student group if the group refuses to allow gay students to vote or take on leadership roles? That's the question being asked in the case coming before the U.S. Supreme Court: Christian Legal Society v. Martinez. In the case, the University of California's Hastings College of the Law's chapter of the Christian Legal Society was told it would be not recognized by the school if it did allow gay members to join, vote and take on leadership roles in the group. CLS is suing the school in a First Amendment case that goes before the Supreme Court on Monday.

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The Takeaway

Looking for the Next Justice

Monday, April 12, 2010

Justice John Paul Stevens announced on Friday that he will retire this June, after spending 35 years on the bench. Democrats say they want to move quickly into the nomination process in order to have the next justice confirmed by the end of the summer.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: California's Earthquake, Justice Stevens Prepares to Retire

Monday, April 05, 2010

  • EARTHQUAKE TAKEOUT: A 7.2 earthquake shook Baja, California yesterday afternoon and was felt across Southern California. Susan Hough, seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey gives us the latest from Pasadena.
  • COURT TAKEOUT: Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens says he may soon announce his retirement after more than 34 years on the bench. Adam Liptak, Supreme Court correspondent for our partner The New York Times helps predict when the announcement may come and its political implications.

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court This Week: Enron, Gun Control, Torture

Monday, March 01, 2010

This week, the Supreme Court will hear three very different cases; from corporate trials, to gun control laws, to international torture laws. New York Times Supreme Court correspondent Adam Liptak previews each case.

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Lawmakers vs. Toyota, Olympics Preview, Supreme Court Rules That Ad Libbing Miranda Rights is Legal

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

  • CONGRESS TAKEOUT:   Some lawmakers may be facing a conflict of interest as they go toe to toe with Toyota executives.  Communications director for the Center for Responsive Politics, Dave Levinthal, says many of these lawmakers are stockholders in Toyota.
  • OLYMPICS PREVIEW: Jason Stallman, reporting on the Winter Olympics for The New York Times, has the latest from Vancouver and looks ahead to Lindsey Vonn's upcoming race.
  • SUPREME COURT: Supreme Court correspondent for The New York Times, Adam Liptak, explains the Court's latest decision that police may now ad lib the Miranda Rights.

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The Takeaway

Will China Control Our Elections?

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

The Supreme Court's landmark opinion last week may have lasting effects on how politics are conducted in the future, especially when foreign money comes into the picture. The decision on Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission says that corporations have the same rights as individuals under the First Amendment, and can spend unlimited amounts of money on political commercials.

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The Takeaway

More Corporate Money Coming To Elections Near You

Friday, January 22, 2010

Yesterday, the Supreme Court effectively overturned The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, the campaign finance reform passed in 2002.  Senators John Mcain (R-Ariz.) and Russ Feingold (D-Wisc.) designed the law to limit the influence of big business and labor unions on elections. 

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The Takeaway

Campaign Finance Changes in 2010 and Beyond

Friday, January 22, 2010

The Supreme Court's decision yesterday in Citizens United v. FEC will significantly change the legal landscape for campaign finance, allowing corporations, unions and other organizations to spend as much as they like for ads supporting a particular candidate or party.

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The Takeaway

Analyzing Justice Roberts' Supreme Court

Friday, January 22, 2010

In what will certainly be looked back upon as a landmark and highly controversial decision, the Supreme Court reversed longstanding restrictions on campaign finance yesterday: specifically, laws restricting corporations and corporate money during election season.

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The Takeaway

Implications of the Supreme Court's Decision in 'Citizen's United'

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Today's Supreme Court's decision in Citizens United v. FEC represents the most significant campaign finance and perhaps First Amendment decision we've seen from the Court in a very long time. The decision struck down the part of the McCain/Feingold campaign finance law (BCRA) that banned corporations and unions from using their treasury funds to run candidate specific ads before a federal election. The decision treats corporations like individuals, focusing on the value of their speech as opposed to the unique identity of the corporation as speaker. Previous decisions, now overruled, had held that corporations presented a unique corruption threat to the political process: "that immense aggregations of wealth [amassed] through the corporate form" posed dangers that individual expenditures did not.

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