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Supreme Court

The Brian Lehrer Show

Voting Rights; Mediterranean Diet; Working From Home; Global Kitchen

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Longtime Supreme Court watcher and Yale Law School lecturer, Linda Greenhouse, discusses the stakes of the Voting Rights Act case being argued before the high court today. Plus: the benefits of the Mediterranean diet; "Our Global Kitchen" at the American Museum of Natural History; Yahoo!'s ban on working from home; and more on American idioms.

The Brian Lehrer Show

On Day One

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor discusses her life on the high court and the story of how she got there. Plus: President Obama's second inaugural address; the terrifying prospect of waking up during anesthesia; and the NPR quiz show Ask Me Another.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Tributes: Robert Bork

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

Robert Bork made history back in 1987 when his nomination to the Supreme Court was blocked by Congressional Democrats. As a result, modern boundaries of cultural fights over abortion, civil rights, and other issues were drawn. As solicitor general in the U.S. Justice Department, Bork had been involved in the 1973 "Saturday night massacre" of the Watergate era, carrying out President Richard Nixon's order to fire special prosecutor Archibald Cox. The former federal judge and conservative legal scholar died just recently at the age of 85, and you can hear his 1989 interview with Leonard.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Getting Prepped

Friday, November 30, 2012

Retired Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen discusses his new post-Sandy role as the co-chair of Governor Cuomo’s Respond Commission, charged with making sure New York State is prepared for future weather disasters. Plus: Emily Bazelon of Slate discusses the same-sex marriage cases that could go before the Supreme Court; overlooked international news stories; the argument for higher wages for retail workers; and new inductees to the People’s Hall of Fame.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Affirmative Action & The Supreme Court

Tuesday, October 09, 2012

Emily Bazelon, senior editor and court watcher at Slate, previews the stakes of the affirmative action case before the Supreme Court--and takes your calls on how affirmative action has affected you.

 

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It's A Free Country ®

Watching 'Tax' Tweets After Supreme Court Decision

Thursday, July 05, 2012

You know how your corner of Twitter reacted to last week's Supreme Court decision, but how did *everyone* on Twitter react?

As an experiment, and to tinker with some new tools, the WNYC Data News team tried to find out.

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court Overturns Stolen Valor Act

Friday, June 29, 2012

The Affordable Health Care Act wasn’t the only decision that the Supreme Court passed yesterday. By a 6-3 vote, the 2005 Federal Stolen Valor Act was struck down. The Act, which made it a crime to lie about having served in the military, was declared invalid under the First Amendment.

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On The Media

Supreme Court Justices Read Newspapers Too

Friday, March 30, 2012

Media coverage can influence public opinion, but can public opinion really influence the Supreme Court? With its lifetime appointments the court is designed to exist above the fray. Bob speaks with Slate's Dahlia Lithwick who says that despite that, public opinion was a big factor in this week's arguments.

 

Dustin Wong - Tea Tree Leaves Retreat

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Critical Day in Supreme Court Health Care Hearings

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Today is the day that the Supreme Court hears arguments about the "individual mandate."  Sara Rosenbaum, Harold and Jane Hirsh Professor of Health Policy at George Washington University, discusses what we learned yesterday and what's expected in today's hearings.

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The Takeaway

Day Two: The Supreme Court and Health Care

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Taxes, penalties, and tax penalties. That sums up much of what was discussed at yesterday's Supreme Court hearing on the 2010 health care overhaul bill, also known as the Affordable Care Act. Today's hearing, in which the court will focus on the constitutionality of the health overhaul, promises to be much more exciting. We speak with Jeffrey Rosen, professor of law at George Washington University, and Monica Haymond, a legal assistant originally from California who's been sleeping outside the Supreme Court Building since Friday night, hoping to get into today’s hearing.

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WNYC News

High Court Ruling On GPS Tracking Could Affect City Taxi Suit

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

WNYC

A local attorney will argue a case using the recent Supreme Court decision banning law enforcement from using GPS to track suspects without a warrant to challenge the use of data gathered from GPS systems in cabs as evidence. He's defending a taxi driver in a lawsuit against the city's Taxi and Limousine Commission.

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On The Media

Naked Statutes

Friday, January 13, 2012

On Tuesday, The Supreme Court heard arguments over the constitutionality of the government’s rules regarding indecent TV programming. In particular, what was at issue is whether the FCC can regulate indecency between 6am and 10pm. (Broadcasters are already given more latitude after 10pm, presumably after the kids have gone to bed.) Bob spoke with Slate's Dahlia Lithwick whose article about the arguments is titled Ifs, Ands, And Butts.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Supreme Court Goes Big

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Emily Bazelon, senior editor at Slate previews the next session of the Supreme Court, which will include Arizona immigration law, Obama's health reform law, and redistricting in Texas. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Justice Breyer on American Democracy

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Stephen Breyer, Supreme Court Justice and author of Making Our Democracy Work: A Judge's View, offers his view of interpreting the Constitution. 

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court Enters Term's Final Week

Monday, June 27, 2011

Today the Supreme Court begins the last week of its term, and it may have saved some of its most controversial decisions for last. The court will announce decisions on four remaining cases, two of which involve First Amendment disputes.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

What's Next for Women Workers at Wal-Mart?

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Lizabeth Schalet, employment discrimination attorney and partner at Lipman and Plesur, and Beverly Cooper Neufeld, President of New York Women's Agenda and director of the Equal Pay Coalition of New York City, discuss the future for class action sex discrimination litigation after the Supreme Court's dismissal of Wal-Mart v. Dukes.

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It's A Free Country ®

What Merits the Corporate Death Penalty?

Friday, May 27, 2011

It opens up a Pandora's box about what we can actually do with recidivist corporations who are doing us in. I'd like to see the same kind of rule applied to Wall Street; the crimes involved there are so much greater in magnitude...and no one has been punished. Imagine if a hedge fund got caught involved in systematic insider trading and lost their license and could never do business again.

Les Leopold, executive director of the Labor Institute, on The Brian Lehrer Show

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The Takeaway

Supreme Court Orders California to Release 30,000 Prisoners

Tuesday, May 24, 2011

The Supreme Court ruled Monday in Brown v. Plata that California's overcrowded prisons violate the Eighth Amendment ban on cruel and unusual punishment, and ordered the release of 30,000 prisoners. The 5-4 decision was sharply divided. Justice Kennedy, leading for the Majority, described “telephone-booth-sized cages without toilets,” used to house suicidal inmates. Justice Scalia, offering a vigorous dissent, called the prisoners who will eventually be released “just 46,000 happy-go-lucky felons fortunate enough to be selected.”

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The Takeaway

Should Pharmaceutical Reps Have the Right to Doctors' Prescription Histories?

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

How do you define the right to free speech? Some would argue it means being allowed to say what you believe, even when it's not popular. Others would say it means getting a good look at what kind of prescriptions that your doctor has given you. At least, that's the argument being made in a Supreme Court case today, in which company IMS Health will make a case for allowing pharmaceutical companies to get a gander at just what kind of prescriptions you're picking up at the pharmacy for marketing purposes. 

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The Takeaway

Where Will 5 Chinese Muslims Go After Gitmo?

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

The fate of the five remaining Chinese Muslims being held in Guantanamo Bay became murkier this week. The U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal on behalf of the Uighurs — who have been cleared of any implications of terrorism. The appeal may have allowed them to stay here in the U.S. after they are released from Cuba. Sabin Willet represents the five remaining detainees. He says that the Uighurs have refused an invitation to resettle in Palau because they see it as an island exile. 

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