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Supreme Court

BackStory

The Supreme Court and Civil Rights

Friday, June 27, 2014

With the American History Guys

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WNYC News

U.S. Supreme Court Rejects NJ Sports Betting

Monday, June 23, 2014

The state's appeal, led by Gov. Chris Christie, argued that New Jersey was trying to limit illegal sports wagering and capture some of that money for the state treasury.

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WNYC News

Coveted Green Cards Now Within Reach For Gay Couples

Monday, November 11, 2013

When the Supreme Court struck down the key provisions of the Defense of Marriage Act in June, it was a moment of jubilation for same-sex binational couples. Many immediately applied to sponsor their spouses for green cards. WNYC’s Mirela Iverac was there as one couple took the final step in that process.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Nina Totenberg; Sandy Legal Help; StoryCorps

Monday, October 28, 2013

A year after Sandy, legal and insurance tangles persist. Yisroel Schulman of the New York Legal Assistance Group takes your calls on what kind of legal help is still available. Plus: NPR’s Nina Totenberg on this Supreme Court term; Dave Isay on StoryCorps on ten years of personal stories; and the election series 30 Issues in 30 Days continues with transportation week, and we’ll start with cars and how to manage New York’s roads.

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Roberts Court

Tuesday, October 08, 2013

The Supreme Court starts a new term this week with a key campaign finance case. Harvard law professor Mark Tushnet, In the Balance: Law and Politics on the Roberts Court (W. W. Norton & Company, 2013), discusses how political concerns influence the court's deliberations -- and the big cases being decided this term.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

AirBnB and the NY AG; SCOTUS; History of Government in Crisis

Tuesday, October 08, 2013

→ Tonight at 7pm: Comptroller Debate Live on WNYC. Stream and Listen Here.

The New York Attorney General has subpoenaed information about AirBnB hosts, according to the company. WNYC’s Charlie Herman explains what’s known about the request for information, and what it says about the company’s legal battles in New York City. Then, Mark Tushnet of Harvard previews the new Supreme Court term. Plus: we’ll hear about a decision from the Dominican Republic to strip citizenship from those born in the country to Haitian parents; an architecture professor explains humanism and the discipline; and a deep dive into the history of our government in crisis with Princeton University professor Julian Zelizer.

Gabfest Radio

Gabfest Radio: The Out From Under the DOMA Edition

Saturday, June 29, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz discuss the Supreme Court’s historic rulings on same-sex marriage and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

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WNYC News

Same-Sex Binational Couples Celebrate DOMA Decision

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Gay and lesbian Americans married to foreign citizen are among those celebrating the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the key provision of the Defense of Marriage Act - because now they can sponsor their spouses for green cards. 

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WNYC News

For DOMA Plaintiff Edie Windsor, Path Has Been 'Accident of History'

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Edie Windsor, the 84-year-old plaintiff in the Supreme Court case that struck down the Federal Defense of Marriage Act, was asked what her immediate reaction was when she heard the news Wednesday.

“I cried,” she said.

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WNYC News

Timeline | A Brief History of Same-sex Marriage in the Courts

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

WNYC

Same-sex marriage in U.S. courts didn't start with the case currently pending in the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1967, the Supreme court ruled on a case involving miscegenation and established marriage as a protected constitutional right. Dozens of other court battles have been fought in the decades since to determine how and whether the right to marry - and related benefits - should be extended to same-sex couples.

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The Takeaway

Patents On Genes Ruled Unconstitutional

Friday, June 14, 2013

Yesterday, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that human genes cannot be patented, but synthetic DNA is still patentable. The case was brought against Myriad Genetics, which owned patents on two naturally occurring genes associated with breast and ovarian cancer. Those patents allowed the company to exclusively administer breast cancer tests and set the price. According to the plaintiffs, they set that price too high.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Lever Machines; SCOTUS Preview; Legal Weed; Little League

Thursday, May 30, 2013

There's a proposal to bring back the old lever voting machines temporarily in New York. Hear a debate between Common Cause's Susan Lerner and Republican State Senator Martin Golden. Plus: New York Times Supreme Court correspondent, Adam Liptak, previews the cases the court has yet to rule on this term; the final installment of the Legal Weed series; WNYC's Beth Fertig on Mayor Bloomberg's small schools legacy; and a new book on a Newark little league team.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Justice Sotomayor; Against Landmines; Primates and Humanism

Monday, May 27, 2013

We’re airing some of our favorite recent segments on this Memorial Day. U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor talks about growing up in the Bronx and her path to the highest court. Then, we hear listeners respond to two questions inspired by Justice Sotomayor’s interview: first, is law school worth it? And who inspired you to see the world differently? Plus, Nobel Peace Prize winner Jody Williams on her activism against landmines; primatologist Frans de Waal on what animals can teach us about innate morality and therefore about religion; and a discussion about the intersection of art and science with performance artist Marina Abramović and two NYU neuroscientists.

The Brian Lehrer Show

IRS Scandal; Roberts Court; Gender at Work; Daily Obit

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

The White House is on the defensive this week. Hear about the latest on the various controversies in Washington. Plus: Supreme Court watcher Marcia Coyle on her new book The Roberts Court; John Gray, author of Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus, and his co-author Barbara Annis of the new book on gender-based misunderstandings in the workplace; and New York Times obituaries editor Bill McDonald on the obituary of the day.

Intelligence Squared US

Intelligence Squared US: Should We Abolish the Minimum Wage?

Saturday, May 04, 2013

Broadcast Times: Saturday 6am on 93.9FM, Saturday 2pm on AM 820 and Sunday 7am on AM 820 and 8pm on AM 820

The first attempt at establishing a national minimum wage, a part of 1933’s sweeping National Industrial Recovery Act, was struck down by the Supreme Court in 1935. But in 1938, under the Fair Labor Standards Act, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed into law a minimum hourly wage of 25 cents—$4.07 in today’s dollars. Three-quarters of a century later, we are still debating the merits of this cornerstone of the New Deal. Do we need government to ensure a decent paycheck, or would low-wage workers and the economy be better off without its intervention?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Bush v. Gore 13 Years Later; Who Smokes Pot; Joe Lhota

Thursday, May 02, 2013

Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor has said that perhaps the high court should not have taken up Bush v. Gore. Hear what her comments tell us about the 5-4 decision, public opinion, and potential future cases. Then, a May series on marijuana legalization kicks off with Mark Kleiman, who is advising Washington state on their legalization efforts. He’ll discuss the demographics of who smokes marijuana. Plus: Former MTA chairman Joseph Lhota talks about his bid to be the Republican candidate for mayor, and his policies for stop-and-frisk, emergency preparedness and the environment; and a conversation about rationing and consumption.

Gabfest Radio

Gabfest Radio: The DOMA at the SCOTUS Edition

Saturday, March 30, 2013

On this week’s episode of Gabfest Radio from Slate and WNYC, Political Gabfest panelists Emily Bazelon, John Dickerson, and David Plotz discuss the Supreme Court oral arguments about two momentous gay marriage cases, one involving California’s Proposition 8 and the other focusing on the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). They also consider This American Life’s investigation of why so many Americans are receiving disability benefits.

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On The Media

Do Supreme Court Rulings Reflect the Culture, or Change it?

Friday, March 29, 2013

The question of same-sex marriage landed in the Supreme Court this past week, and marriage equality supporters are hoping for a landmark ruling that will legalize same-sex marriage. If it happens, it’ll be one in a series of history-making Supreme Court rulings. But how does it work? Does the Supreme Court have the power to change the culture, or does our culture influence the decisions of the justices? NYU law professor Barry Friedman has written a book on that very question. He tells Bob that for the most part, the Supreme Court tries to shape their decisions according to what the public wants. 

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On The Media

Remembering Anthony Lewis

Friday, March 29, 2013

Anthony Lewis passed away this week at 85 after a long and storied career covering the Supreme Court for The New York Times. In a segment originally aired in 2008, Brooke spoke with Lewis about his book Freedom for the Thought We Hate, an examination of the First Amendment. He explained that the amendment that governs free speech and the press might not be as familiar as we think.

 

Oddisee - Frostbite

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Prop 8 Arguments; Disability on the Rise; Gov. McGreevey

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments on California's Prop 8 same sex marriage ban yesterday. Hear audio of the justices and analysis. Plus: Planet Money's Chana Jaffe-Walt talks about why so many are on federal disability; reforming urban school systems; and Governor Jim McGreevey on the documentary about his reinvention.