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Sudan

PRI's The World

This architect says the most important feature of a mosque is its sustainability

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Mosques have huge variations in their designs and decorations. But when it comes to designing new mosques in the US, one architect wants to focus on sustainability instead of ornate designs and big chandeliers.

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WNYC News

How the Case Against BNP Paribas was Pieced Together

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

BNP Paribas will pay a record $8.9 billion fine. That's big news — but just how the case against the bank was pieced together is even more fascinating.

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On The Media

Trying to Make it News

Friday, June 13, 2014

For years the Sudanese government has been waging a bombing campaign against civilians in Nuba, a region in the country's South. The conflict has gone unreported by most media outlets, except one: Nuba Reports. Brooke talks with the site's founder, Ryan Boyette, about his efforts to bring global attention to the crisis. 

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The Takeaway

A Failure of Leadership in South Sudan

Thursday, January 09, 2014

More than 1,000 people have been killed in the violence in South Sudan that erupted last month, following a power struggle between President Salva Kiir and his former deputy, Riek Machar. The Takeaway talks with Alex de Waal, executive director of the World Peace Foundation at Tufts University’s Fletcher School, about the roots of the current crisis. Deb Dawson, of Fargo, North Dakota also weighs in. Dawson works closely with Sudanese Lost Boys and Lost Girls both in the U.S. and abroad.

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The Takeaway

South Sudan: The World's Youngest Nation in Crisis

Friday, December 27, 2013

South Sudan gained its independence nearly three years ago, but as the country marks its third birthday, few have reason to celebrate. Violence erupted in the world's newest nation earlier this month. South Sudan's President Salva Kiir has accused his former vice president, Riek Machar, of attempting a coup. Jendayi Frazer, former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs and a Distinguished Public Service Professor at Carnegie Mellon University, examines the origins of the conflict in South Sudan, and how the international community should move forward.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Mary Williams, Jane Fonda's Adopted Daughter

Friday, August 30, 2013

Mary Williams talks about being born into the Black Panther movement, being raised amid violence and near-poverty, and being adopted as a teenager by Jane Fonda. Her memoir The Lost Daughter is a chronicle of her transformed life, her time working with the Lost Boys of Sudan, and reconnecting with her biological family in Oakland.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Mary Williams on Being Adopted by Jane Fonda

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Mary Williams talks about being born into the Black Panther movement, being raised amid violence and near-poverty, and being adopted as a teenager by Jane Fonda. Her memoir The Lost Daughter is a chronicle of her transformed life, her time working with the Lost Boys of Sudan, and reconnecting with her biological family in Oakland.

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Soundcheck

Sinkane: A West African Hero Meets East African Sound

Thursday, November 08, 2012

If you happened to attend any of this year's CMJ Music Marathon in New York City, chances are you came across the name Sinkane. It's the project of guitarist and singer Ahmed Gallab -- who, in the past, has drummed for Of Montreal, Yeasayer and Caribou. The band played six CMJ shows in just three days, and then topped off an exhausting weekend with a release show for its debut album, Mars

The name "Sinkane" is inspired by Joseph Cinqué, a West African who was illegally enslaved in the mid-19th century and eventually led a slave revolt on the ship Amistad. As Gallab tells host John Schaefer, "Sinkane is a word that I misheard in a Kanye West lyric. I heard the song 'Never Let Me Down' on his first record, and J. Ivy, who's rapping, says, 'Give us, us free like Cinqué,' which I misheard as Sinkane. I created this idea of who Sinkane was in my mind."

Gallab, who was born in Sudan, combines his love of East African soul with his indie pop and dance-ready electronic grooves on Sinkane's debut album. He and his bandmates perform a live set in our studio. 

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The Takeaway

The 'Machine Gun Preacher' on Opening an Orphanage in South Sudan

Monday, December 26, 2011

Sam Childers was once a drug dealer whose work often turned violent, but in the summer of 1992, he attended a church revival and decided to abandon his life of crime. After traveling to war-torn Sudan to find a way to aid children there, he founded an orphanage with his wife in what is now South Sudan. Childers came on The Takeaway in September to discuss his life, his orphanage, and making amends.

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The Takeaway

Sam Childers: The Real-Life 'Machine Gun Preacher'

Friday, September 23, 2011

Sam Childers was once drug dealer, who dabbled in violent crime. But in the summer of 1992, he attended a church revival and decided to abandon his life of crime, and travel to war-torn Sudan to find a way to aid children there. With his wife, Childers founded an orphanage in South Sudan, where they have now housed and educated over 1,000 youths. A new film, "Machine Gun Preacher," starring Gerard Butler depicts Childer's story.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

South Sudan: One Week Birthday

Friday, July 15, 2011

First, a brief follow-up on the News of World scandal and a song by Billy Bragg (read more).

Then, South Sudan in one week old. Wasil Ali, deputy editor in chief of Sudan Tribune, and Jose Hulsenbek, head of mission for Doctors Without Borders in South Sudan, discuss the humanitarian and political challenges facing the country.

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The Takeaway

South Sudan Declares Independence

Monday, July 11, 2011

It's the first week of official business for the world's newest country. The Republic of South Sudan officially came into existence on Saturday, after gaining independence from the northern part of the country, still known as Sudan. It's the first new country in the world since 1993. The BBC's James Copnall joins us from Khartuom, in the north, tells us how this country came to be and what's in store for its future. 

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The Takeaway

Sudanese Lost Boys Reconnect as Men

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

It has been one of the most harrowing stories to come out of Africa in the recent decades: 27,000 young boys fleeing almost certain death or forced military service as child soldiers in a steady stream out of Sudan during it's 20-year second civil war, which started in 1983. In 2000, some 4,000 "Lost Boys" came to the United States in a resettlement program. Ten years later, many in America and around the world are reconnecting though a recently-discovered store of documents from aid workers in Africa. The discovery is helping them document their own lives as well as the lives of their friends. We listen to some tape on this story with help from Paul Adams at the BBC. 

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The Takeaway

25 Years of Genocide Prevention

Friday, February 18, 2011

Sunday marks 25 years since the US Senate ratified the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. That convention entered into force in 1951 but the US Senate refrained from ratification until 1986. Why? Adam Jones is a professor of political science at the University of British Columbia and author of "Genocide: A Comprehensive Introduction."

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: South Sudan Independence

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Last month, the southern Sudanese people voted 99% in favor of breaking away from northern Sudan and creating an independent state. Oliver August, Africa correspondent for The Economist, and Jehanne Henry, Sudan researcher for Human Rights Watch, explain the 2005 peace agreement that led to this vote and the challenges South Sudan faces in setting up a new nation.

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The Takeaway

Sudan Referendum Sets Stage for Diaspora to Return Home

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

Many nations in North Africa and the Middle East are no stranger to election results that seem less than democratic. In 2006, Yemeni President Ali Abdallah Saleh won re-election with seventy-seven percent of the popular vote. In 2005, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak took eighty-eight percent of the vote. And in 2009, Tunisia's now ex-President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali commanded nearly ninety percent of the vote.

It may be hard to imagine a country in the same region where a free, fair and transparent election results in more than ninety eight percent of people voting for the same outcome. But that's exactly what happened in Southern Sudan, where 98.83 percent of nearly four million voters chose separation from their countrymen to the north.

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The Takeaway

Can South Sudan Gain Independence Peacefully?

Monday, February 07, 2011

It's a historic moment in African history. South Sudan will secede from the North, which is predominantly Muslim. Though Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir campaigned on a promise to maintain unity, he has told the South that he will now accept secession. But last Thursday, fighting broke out in a battalion of Southern Sudanese militiamen who refused to redeploy to the North. The apparent mutiny killed at least 50 people. Will the referendum results allow South Sudan independence through peace? 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Sudanese Vote on Their Country's Future

Friday, January 14, 2011

Sudanese expat Nisrin Elamin, blogger at Stories From Darfur and coordinator of the Support Darfur Project, joins John Prendergast, co-founder of the Enough Project, to discuss Southern Sudan's current referendum on independence and what it means for the troubled country.

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The Takeaway

Generations Affected by Decades of War in Sudan

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Almost all of the four million voters in Southern Sudan casting their votes on whether or not to secede from the North have been affected by decades of bloodshed and civil war in that country. Takeaway producer Noel King has been reporting from the ground in Southern Sudan during the preparation for the vote as well as the referendum itself. Noel shares with us the stories she's heard from people of all different generations, and how all the violence has affected their lives.

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World Weekly with Gideon Rachman

Sudan, Haiti and US politics

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

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