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Transportation Nation

Everything You Need to Know About the MTA's Fare and Toll Hike

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

This weekend, transit fares and MTA bridge and tunnel tolls are going up.
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The Brian Lehrer Show

Albany Politics; Subway Troubles & The Bystander Effect

Monday, March 16, 2015

It's budget season in Albany; poor subway service this winter; the "bystander effect" at a big fight in a McDonald's; what our passwords say about us & a sensual experience of the past.

WNYC News

Regular Weekday Service Resumes on NYC's Subways

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

The MTA says commuters should check its website for service status today as the system gets back to a regular schedule.

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Transportation Nation

MTA Wants to Help Subway Riders Find Their Way Above Ground

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

WNYC

The neighborhood maps the MTA places in subway stations are getting a major reboot.

 

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Transportation Nation

Pushing for Pre-Tax Transit for More People

Sunday, July 27, 2014

WNYC

Transit advocates posed the question to commuters: what would you do with $443 a year in savings on your MetroCard?

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Transportation Nation

Updated: Scampering Kittens That Halted 2 Subway Lines Up for Adoption

Friday, August 30, 2013

Update: The kittens, Arthur and August are being being put up for adoption at Animal Care of New York. They'll be ready to go to a new home in a couple of weeks. 

Trains were stopped. The third rail was deactivated. Shuttle buses were scrambled. The police were called in. All because kittens were on the loose in the Church Avenue stop of the B and Q subway lines in Brooklyn on Thursday. 

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Transportation Nation

NYC Subways Inch Closer to Full Cell Coverage with Verizon Deal

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

WNYC

This week, Verizon became the last of the major cell phone carriers to ink a deal to deliver cell service to the NYC subway system. But that doesn't mean all the platforms will be buzzing with incoming calls. 

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Transportation Nation

Big Business Group in NYC Says Put Transit Where Jobs Are: Outer Boroughs

Thursday, August 15, 2013

WNYC

A big business group is putting its significant clout behind an effort to bring more bus rapid transit to New York's outer boroughs.  Compared to 10 years ago, 24 percent more people who work in Brooklyn also live there, according to analysis by the Partnership for New York City.  And they need transit. 

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Transportation Nation

During R Train Outage, a Ferry Alternative - Briefly

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

WNYC

The coming outage of the R train tunnel under the East River will inconvenience straphangers from Bay Ridge and Sunset Park. A ferry will serve as a low-cost option, but not for very long. 

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Transportation Nation

Weekend Subway Warning: All But 2 NYC Lines to See Delays

Friday, July 26, 2013

WNYC

Of the 20 New York subway lines, 18 will be affected by track work this weekend, hindering transportation around the five boroughs on what looks likely to be the first halfway decent weather weekend in a month. Here's the deal. 

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Transportation Nation

NYPD, Researchers to Release Tracer Gas in Subways Again Friday

Thursday, July 18, 2013

WNYC

Day two of air flow testing in the NYC subway and around the city is happening Friday, the NYPD announced. 

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Transportation Nation

NY MTA Tries to Make G Train Less Annoying

Monday, July 15, 2013

WNYC

Riding the G train could make a little more sense by the end of the year and wait times could drop if proposals released Monday by the NY MTA are implemented.

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Transportation Nation

NYPD to Spew (Non-Toxic) Gas in Subway System

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

WNYC

The NYPD and researchers from Brookhaven National Laboratories will release a harmless gas through 21 subway lines as part of a plan to monitor air flows and chart potential responses, including evacuation routes and where to place emergency equipment.

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Transportation Nation

NY MTA Ponders How To Spend An Extra $40 Million

Monday, April 22, 2013

WNYC

The NY MTA is deciding all the time how to spend the discretionary part of its budget. But rarely is that budget unexpectedly enriched by an extra $40 million, which occurred last month when Albany bestowed that much more than requested in state funds. Now the debate begins on how to spend it.

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WQXR Features

Bach in the Subways Day Returns For Third Year

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

For the third year in a row, the cellist Dale Henderson has organized Bach in the Subways as a way to celebrate Johann Sebastian Bach's birthday — and his music.

Comments [17]

Transportation Nation

NY MTA Says Charging $1 For A New Metrocard Is Not, As One Rider Claims, "Ridiculous!"

Monday, March 04, 2013

Replacing a beat-up Metrocard (left) with a new one (right) now costs a dollar.

(New York, NY - WNYC) This weekend, New York subway and bus riders were hit with their fourth fare hike in five years. That money is collected with every swipe of a Metrocard--a piece of technology that was introduced 20 years ago and becomes more obsolete by the day. Despite the card's slow slide into obsolescence, riders must now pay a dollar surcharge if they lose or discard their card.

That has some straphangers, like Rich and Jean Wasicki, grumbling. Every six weeks, the couple come to New York from Buffalo to visit their son, a student at Fordham University. Each time, they buy a Metrocard and, after using it, throw the card away. When Rick Wasicki was informed that the practice will now cost him a dollar per card, he blurted, "Ridiculous! Absolutely ridiculous."

Wasicki said it's a lot to ask a Buffalo guy to keep track of his New York City Metrocard. But the NY Metropolitan Transportation Authority says it costs $10 million a year to produce those cards. Plus, there's the extra cost to cleaning up cards that riders toss on the ground.

Jean Wasicki countered that the NY MTA profits from some of those discarded cards. "Half the time we put dollars, as out-of-towners, on that card that we ultimately don't end up using," she said. "And so those are dollars that the MTA has in its pocket."

Riders do leave about 50 million unredeemed dollars on Metrocards each year. But the NY MTA says that's not extra revenue. It costs the authority the same amount of money to run subway trains on a schedule, whether Wasicki uses all the value on her Metrocard or not.

Naomi Rosenberg commutes by the 1 train to her job at a non-profit serving the homeless. She wondered why New York can't get rid of the Metrocard for something more convenient, like the Transit Card used in Chicago, where her mom lives.

"My mom has a plastic credit card. It's basically connected to her credit card, her transit card," Rosenberg said.

Her mom's transit card draws money directly from her bank account, and refills automatically. "You don't have to keep track of old cards. It's not paper, it's plastic," she added.

The New York plan was to swap out its Metrocard last year for a bank card with a computer chip that would let riders pay their fare. But not enough banks signed up, and the program was scrapped.

The NY MTA is now building its own transit card. The new technology must be ready by 2019, which is around the time the Metrocard turnstiles and vending machines are expected to wear out. In the meantime, the authority expects to collect $20 million a year from the new Metrocard replacement fee, a dollar at a time.

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Transportation Nation

NY MTA Raises Fares For Fourth Time In Five Years -- What You Need to Know

Friday, March 01, 2013

New York area transit riders will now pay more.

(New York, NY - WNYC) It happens at the stroke of midnight on Saturday: fares go up for riders of subways, buses and express buses in and around New York City, and for drivers who use the NY Metropolitan Authority's eight bridges and tunnels. Fares also jumped for riders of the authority's commuter trains.

It's the fourth time in five years that the MTA has raised fares. The base fare will rise from $2.25 to $2.50, and the pay-per-ride bonus drops from 7 to 5 percent, but kicks in after five dollars instead of the previous ten dollars.

The weekly unlimited ride card goes from $29 to $30, and a monthly pass jumps from $104 to $112.

Riders will also be charged a dollar fee to replace a Metrocard, except if it's damaged or expired. Metrocards can now be refilled again and again with time, dollar value, or both. That means riders can add days to an unlimited card and use the cash on that card to connect to an express bus, the PATH Train or the AirTrain, something that was not possible before.

Long Island Rail Road and MetroNorth riders are also feeling the pinch. The NY MTA says most ticket prices are going up about 8 or 9 percent.

Carol Kharivala, of New Hyde Park, said she only travels to Manhattan once or twice a month. Her senior round-trip ticket went from $10 to $11. Kharivala, who is retired, said the increase won't effect her travel plans, but that the hikes are likely more difficult for daily commuters.

"It does make it more difficult for people that are working because the money they put in the bank is not earning very high interest, and their salaries are not going up, either," she said.

Daily commuter Anthony Fama, also from New Hyde Park, agreed. His monthly fare jumped about $20. "I saw the rate went, if I remember the numbers correctly, from $223 to $242, which is, I guess a little bit more than 8 percent," he said. "Last time I checked, cost of living increase was a lot less than that."

Fama also thinks the hikes are unfair for commuters who don't have any other options. "To take multiple subways or buses, express buses, wouldn't make sense for somebody who puts in more than an eight hour day," he said.

The fare hikes have some commuters thinking about other options.

Chris Barbaria commutes from Atlantic Terminal, Brooklyn, to a carpentry job in Babylon, on Long Island, once a week. He said he's now considering biking the distance, even though the ride would take more than two hours.

"I carry tools and stuff, so it's a long haul, it's about 40 miles out there," he said. "I would certainly ride out, it's just going to add to my commute." Barbaria also said he's surprised by the cost of monthly tickets.

"When I was a kid I used to go to school in the city, and my round-trip monthly was $74 from Lynbrook," he said. "I understand now it's over $250 from Lynbrook, which is insane to me."

--with Annmarie Fertoli

 

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WNYC News

Best of the Year: Our 2012 Editor's Picks

Friday, December 21, 2012

Whether we were stepping back to look at the big picture on housing foreclosures nationwide, or getting micro by visiting a 105-square foot studio apartment in the West Village, 2012 was a year of finding fresh angles for the news, and unexpected ways to tell you about it.

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Transportation Nation

Monday's Commute in NY: Subways Run, New Yorkers Patient

Monday, November 05, 2012

The subway map as of 11/15/12

Eight days ago, the subway system shut down.  Seven days ago, it suffered the worst devastation in its history.  All seven tunnels under the East River were flooded.

By Monday morning's commute, most of the subways were running under the East River. The R and the L were not (more on that in a minute).

By Sunday night, the MTA had restored all of the numbered lines across the East River (2, 3, 4, 5 & 7), as well as many lettered lines. This morning, at the last minute, the A, C and E were also connected.  The #1 train ran all the way downtown to Chambers Street.

The rapid restoration of the system caused MTA chairman Joe Lhota to tweet: Who says government doesn't work? Really? Check this out. http://bit.ly/PQ7mnZ.

The link was to the restored subway map.

(Lhota, by the way, is a Republican -- a former Deputy Mayor under Rudy Giuliani.)

MTA spokesman Adam Lisberg says MTA workers have been working "around the clock" to replace signals corroded by salt water.  Lisberg said increased headways -- or time between trains -- was due to reduced power and signalling issues caused by damaged signals.

Commuters, for the most part, were patient as they crowded onto train cars that were running about a third as frequently as usual. In two-and-a-half hours of riding the rails, I didn't hear any sighing, moaning, or cursing at the MTA, or at fellow passengers, a frequent accompaniment to the squeal of the trains on a morning commute.

WNYC's Jim O'Grady reports a similar amount of patience -- for now -- at the J train in Williamsburg, now the backstop for both the L and G. Jim describes the lines as "immense," but says straphangers were so relieved to be able to get into Manhattan that frustration was far from the boiling point.

But at least one straphanger was deterred. "Holy God," he said, seeing the subway line.  "Looks like I'm working from home today.

On Sunday, rider Rachel Tillman applauded outright when the F train re-connected under the East River.  "Good!' she exclaimed, giddily, "It's going all the way.  When I heard the announcement I thought it was a mistake.  Once we reached Jay Street-Metrotech I realized it was going all the way.  It makes me very happy."

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Transportation Update

Thursday, November 01, 2012

Transportation Nation gives us an update on the subway, train, and airport service, and the reopening of roads in the New York area.  

Comments [9]