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Stuxnet

PRI's The World

NATO takes aim at Russia's attacks — online

Thursday, September 04, 2014

With Russia's military intervening in Ukraine, NATO has plenty to discuss at this week's summit. But one aspect of the conflict with Russia goes beyond Ukraine. It lies in cyberspace. And NATO is set to ratify a measure that would directly confront Russian and others on the virtual battlefield.

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The Takeaway

Is the U.S. Government Too Prone to Leaks?

Friday, June 08, 2012

Members of congress met yesterday with the Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, to discuss recent government leaks about two of America’s newest weapons: computer worms (like Stuxnet) and drones. They asserted that each leak puts lives at risk and makes America's allies less likely to trust our government with their secrets.

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The Takeaway

Follow Friday with Dan Damon and Farai Chideya

Friday, June 08, 2012

Our Follow Friday panel, journalist Farai Chideya and BBC World Update host Dan Damon, discusses the top stories of the past week, including the European debt crisis, Diamond Jubilee, White House leaks, Clinton gaffe, and the death of Ray Bradbury.

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The Takeaway

Cyber Security Experts Discover "Flame," The Newest, Best Way to Spy on a Country

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

A Moscow-based cyber security team has discovered the most advanced computer program for spying ever – they say a nation wrote it to spy on the Middle East, though they don't know which nation specifically. They’re calling it “Flame.” Roel Schouwenberg, a senior policy analyst for Kaspersky Labs, the company that discovered Flame, explains exactly what makes this worm so special. And Kim Zetter, a senior writer at Wired Magazine, discusses what this means for the future of espionage and security.

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The Takeaway

Richard Clarke on Stuxnet and Cyber-Security

Thursday, March 29, 2012

This story has all the trappings of a spy novel, or a James Bond film. Espionage. International intrigue. Underground nuclear development. It would make for quite a work of fiction...except that this story is true. In 2010, a little virus called Stuxnet caused severe damage to an Iranian uranium-enrichment facility, effectively delaying Iran’s nuclear capabilities for months or possibly years. It was long thought that Israel took the lead in developing Stuxnet, but our next guest thinks that the Untied States was the culprit. And while we Americans might be skilled in creating cyber-viruses, we might be completely unprepared when it comes to defending ourselves against them.  

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The Takeaway

The Quiet War Against Iran's Nuclear Program

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Stuxnet, the mysterious computer virus which only targets Siemens industrial software and equipment, devastated Iran's uranium enrichment facility at Natanz and nuclear reactor at Bushehr. These setbacks didn't incur any loss of life; however, they weren't the only actions taken against Iran's nuclear program. Many experts believe that a covert campaign of assassinations, bombings, and sabotage has been anonymously carried out over the past three years by Israel and the Bush and Obama administrations.

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The Takeaway

Growing Tensions Between Iran and West

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Iran says another one of its nuclear scientists has been killed, this time by a motorcyclist who attached a bomb to his car in Tehran this morning. It was the fourth such killing reported in two years and comes at a time of growing tension between Iran and the West. Joining the program is Gordon Corera, security correspondent for our partner the BBC.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Who Was Behind the Stuxnet Worm?

Thursday, March 03, 2011

The Stuxnet virus made headlines when it damaged computers at Iran’s nuclear program. On this week’s Underreported segment, Vanity Fair writer Michael Joseph Gross looks at who could have built Stuxnet and why Israel may not have been behind the computer worm as many initially assumed. Plus, we’ll look at what Stuxnet means for the future of cyber warfare.

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