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Schoolbook

In Crown Heights, Getting Past Stereotypes Through Learning

Wednesday, May 02, 2012

Four high school students from the Caribbean arrived this year at a high school in the heart of Crown Heights, Brooklyn, with zero knowledge of the history of tension between the black and Lubavitch Jewish communities. A reporting workshop led them on a journey through stereotypes and misinformation to conversation and discovery.

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WNYC News

Harlem Students Take to Streets to Show Support for Trayvon Martin

Thursday, April 05, 2012

A group of high school students from Democracy Prep in Harlem added their voices to the outrage over the killing of Florida teen Trayvon Martin on Thursday. They wore hoodies and marching through the neighborhood. View a slideshow of the students in their hoodies explaining what it has come to symbolize to them.

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The Takeaway

End of Month Hunger Affects Student Discipline

Thursday, April 05, 2012

A study of schools throughout the city of Chicago has found that detention and suspension rates increase towards the end of each month and sharply decrease at the beginning of the next. The main culprit, they believe, may be the students' diets. The study links the behavior with spending patterns associated to the national food-stamp program, SNAP. Lisa Gennetian, managing director of the behavioral economics research think tank Ideas42, thinks it's time for a change.

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The Takeaway

Rural Schools Recruit Abroad To Stay Afloat

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Small towns are shrinking across America, and along with them student populations. When a student population shrinks, so does a school’s state funding. But some rural and small town schools have found an inventive way to stay afloat by recruiting international students who pay up to $30,000 per year to attend an American public school — regardless of where in America that school is.

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Schoolbook

For Legacy High School Students, a Lesson in Activism Hits Home

Tuesday, February 07, 2012

Keyla Marte and other students participating in an after-school program to learn about ways to improve the community took on the effort to save the Legacy School for Integrated Studies in Manhattan, scheduled to be closed by the city. The students used social media and campaign-style strategies to get their message out and to rally support.

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Schoolbook

Unearthing the Surprises Within a Child's Mind

Monday, November 21, 2011

A middle-school teacher writes: Often I read a child’s paper, or talk to him or her, and am startled at the interpretation of events in his or her life. It is as though no one has explained the world to these children, and so they try to understand it based on what they can see. We must remember to ask, or we will never know.

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Features

Fine Arts Programs Open their Studios to the Public

Friday, November 18, 2011

The arts studios of NYU and Hunter are some of the most competitive in the country. As a result they're usually closed to the public. For one weekend, the studios will be open for visitors to check out the student work in progress.

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Schoolbook

A Program to Turn Around Troubled Students

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

A nonprofit program, Turnaround for Children, is focusing on students' psychological and emotional well-being. In doing so, it "occupies a middle ground between the educators and politicians who believe schools should be more like community centers, and the education-reform movement, with its no-excuses mantra," The Times reports on Tuesday.

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The Takeaway

Libyan Student Stuck in Diplomatic Limbo

Friday, October 21, 2011

Reactions to the death of Moammar Gadhafi continue to pour in from Libya and across the U.S. Mohamed Gibril is a student at Michigan State University. He and other Libyan students were sent to the U.S. to study under a Libyan government program for diplomatic training before the uprising against the Gadhafi regime. Since then his visa has run out and he's been unable to return safely. He and his fellow students are currently in limbo due to the turmoil in their country. Assia Bashir Amry is the daughter of exiled Libyan revolutionary ElHajj Sabr, a revolutionary who did not live to see Gadhafi's ouster. She talks about what feelings Gadhafi's death has brought up for her.

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The Takeaway

200 Students Miss School After Implementation of Alabama Immigration Law

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

Last week, The Takeaway reported on an Alabama immigration law that is considered on of the toughest in the nation. A federal judge upheld the law in a challenge by the Justice Department. Among its provisions, the law requires Alabama's public schools to check the legal documentation of its students. Since the law went into effect on Thursday, over 200 Latino students went missing from schools in Huntsville. The law does not give schools the right to turn away children. Schools are only required to report to the state if a child cannot produce legal documentation.

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Schoolbook

It Took a School to Build a Village School

Friday, September 09, 2011

Students from the Bronx Center for Science and Mathematics thought it was hard work to raise $74,000 to build a school in Mali and pay for 13 students to travel there to start the construction. But once there, they wrote, they found themselves laughing, dancing, singing -- and appreciating more than ever the value of an education.

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The Takeaway

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan on No Child Left Behind Proposal

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

Yesterday, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced a major override of the No Child Left Behind accountability law for schools. Duncan's proposal will mean that states can apply to bypass performance requirements in the law. One of those requirements is that 100 percent students be proficient in reading and math by 2014. Arne Duncan talks about about the overhaul in the law and how it will affect students and schools. (Transcript available after the jump.)

Yesterday, the Secretary of Education announced a major override of the No Child Left Behind accountability law for schools.
Secretary Arne Duncan's proposal will mean that states can apply to bypass performance requirements in the law.
One of those requirements is that 100% students be proficient in reading and math by 2014.

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The Takeaway

A Story Evolves: Unemployment and Student Achievement

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Ever wonder how a story on The Takeaway evolves? Our stories can start with everything from a tweet to a listener response phoned in during the morning's show, and move forward over the next hours as we interact with guests, put together radio segments, and blog on the subject at hand. This week, one of our stories began with a paper about student performance being impacted by unemployment rates. In the visual element below, you can see first hand how the story progressed, from our initial tweet and listener responses to a blog from Takeaway contributor Beth Kobliner

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The Takeaway

Young Writer Tackles Race, Religion, American Identity

Wednesday, June 01, 2011

Every year, the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards honor the best high school and middle school students in a variety of categories, including painting, journalism and fiction. Past winners include leaders and luminaries in their respective fields, including Joyce Carol Oates, Andy Warhol and Truman Capote. Some 185,000 pieces of art and writing submitted this year, and eighteen-year-old Haris Durrani was one of seven high school seniors to win a gold medal for a portfolio of writing, out of 3,000 portfolio entries.

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Features

Let's Lunch: City Students Make Art out of Lunch Tables

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Ten different lunchroom tables with colorful messages went on display at Union Square on Thursday, in the largest student art exhibit ever in the city's parks.

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The Takeaway

'Northern Lights 1996' Explores Students' Rights, Then and Now

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Half a century ago, as Martin Luther King Jr. marched on Washington and Freedom Riders tested the desegregation of interstate buses, students at a Detroit high school stood up for their rights, and won. Finding the facilities and education at their school inferior to what was available at predominately white schools, they staged a walk-out, and refused to come back to their school until their demands were met. A new play called “Northern Lights 1966” tells their story. Starring a cast of high school students, it’s being staged by Detroit’s Mosaic Youth Theatre through this weekend.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: FAA Resignation, 2,500 m.p.g. Buggy, Rail Freight Up

Friday, April 15, 2011

The official in charge of air traffic control at the FAA resigned yesterday, following a second controller falling asleep on the job. (Politico) An overhaul to the whole system is coming. (Marketplace)

Can mayors save the planet? We published our first Portuguese language post ever yesterday on this topic, but if you want a related post in English asking the same question, well, that's OK too. NYC Mayor Bloomberg teams up with Bill Clinton to take the C-40 cleaner cities initiative global. (WNYC)

The struggling commuter rail line in Minnesota's Twin Cities, the North Star Line, is doing a little better at meeting ridership expectations. Part of the reason is higher gas prices. (Pioneer Press)

Motor Trend tested out the Chevy Volt. After 818.3 miles, the team testing it say they used 6.6 gallons of gas. That's worse than expected. But Motor Trend concludes, it's worth buying. (Motor Trend)

A tougher test for one hybrid vehicle is coming up. A team plans to enter the most punishing race on four wheels, the Dakar Rally, with a hybrid-electric truck. Can the delicate electronics survive the sandy trek? (Autoblog)

Look how shiny and new. San Francisco gets a new airport terminal. (SF Gate)

"The good news is the dam is still there and it's holding steady..." A North Dakota dam is in danger of collapse, which would flood 30 homes. (AP, via Infrastructurist)

Yesterday in this post, we linked to a report that trucking freight was down 1.5 percent in February. So here's some cargo data that points in the opposite economic direction. Rail freight was up 7.9 percent in the last quarter of 2010. (Bloomberg)

The tightly watched ticketing of cyclists in New York City for road offenses continues, now handbags are a hot button issue. The dean of students at an elite prep school was ticketed for riding with a handbag on her handlebars. (NY Post) And apparently, you can blame all the bike beef on Paris. NYC Mayor Bloomberg was smitten with the bike network there after a visit and came back with the idea to replicate it in NYC. (NYT)

Next month, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood will deliver the commencement address at Boston College. Chances he tells the graduates not to text and drive? Very high. (Boston Globe) Or maybe he'll tout the good work students can do. Like this impressive bunch form California in a contest to build a vehicle that uses the least fuel possible. Last year's winners got almost 2,500 m.p.g. Yes. 2,500. (Wired)

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It's A Free Blog

No DREAM for Yesica

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

WNYC
I realized around the age of thirteen, from an ominous sick feeling at the pit of my stomach, that one day I would be faced with certain challenges I wouldn’t be able to surpass. I was not aware of any of the laws, but from watching my parents struggle with work, I knew it would be just as difficult for me.

- Radio Rookie, Yesica, on the DREAM Act

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The Takeaway

Takeouts: Chrysler Dealers, Football, Listeners on Loans

Friday, December 18, 2009

  • Business Takeout: Louise Story, finance reporter for our partner, The New York Times, explains why Chrysler is uneasy with government plans to force auto companies into arbitration with former car dealers.
  • Sports Takeout: Ibrahim Abdul-Matin has the results of last night's football (the Colts squeaked out a victory over the Jaguars to keep their perfect record) and a look ahead to the weekend in sports.
  • Listener Takeout: We hear from you about student loans and the fine print that accompanies them.

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The Takeaway

Life in Fine Print: Understanding Your Student Loan

Thursday, December 17, 2009

All week we've been following the ways in which our lives have become inundated with fine print. For the fourth segment in our series, Takeaway contributor Beth Kobliner, author of "Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance In Your Twenties and Thirties," looks at why more people are defaulting on student loans than ever before and how you can avoid being buried by the fine print.

Click through to read Beth's five points to consider when applying for (or paying down) your student loans.

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