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Staten Island

Know Your Neighbor

The Big Readers of Staten Island

Monday, February 13, 2012

Meet a group of Staten Islanders whose idea of a good time is tackling classic literature together: Mark Twain, Chaucer, Confucius, the Koran, even Henry Rollins.  

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Schoolbook

On Staten Island, Little Doubt About a School Closing Vote

Wednesday, February 08, 2012

Members of the education community on Staten Island said they don’t need to hear from Borough President James P. Molinaro or his representative to the Panel for Educational Policy to predict what will happen on Thursday, when the panel will vote on the first school closing on Staten Island since mayoral control of the schools. “The parents might be disadvantaged economically, but they're not stupid,” said a former Staten Island representative to the panel.

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WNYC News

Habitat Restoration Project Begins at Crooke's Point at Great Kills Park

Sunday, January 29, 2012

Parks officials have launched a pilot program to rehabilitate part of a coastal habitat at Great Kills Park on Staten Island. The project involves clearing two acres of a peninsula in the park known as Crooke’s Point, to root out invasive plant species, and eventually clear the way for planting new trees and shrubs that are native to the region.

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Schoolbook

A Staten Island School Blames Its Problems on Location

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

The announcements came year after year: Eight schools to shut down in Manhattan. Ten in the Bronx. Six in Brooklyn. Two in Queens. None on Staten Island. It was hard for Staten Islanders not to develop a degree of superiority when it came to school closings. But now a Staten Island school, P.S. 14, is on the list of 19 city schools to be closed. Some see it as a political decision to close a Staten Island school. And many say the school is facing daunting challenges in the poverty-related problems of its students.

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Transportation Nation

Bronx To Get Real-Time Bus Info

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

(photo by bitchcakesnyc via flickr) Following on the heels of Staten Island, the Bronx will become the second of New York's five boroughs to get real-time bus information.

New York's MTA is currently installing GPS units on the 1,025 buses that serve the borough. The agency said the service will go live sometime this year.

In a press release, MTA head Joe Lhota heralded Bus Time as a time saver (and caffeine-enabler). "Knowing how far away your next bus is means you can spend more time with your family or more time at a coffee shop instead of waiting at a bus stop in a state of uncertainty," he said. "About 90% of our customers carry text-message enabled cell phones, so this is a big step forward to help make the lives of our customers a lot easier."

This technology debuted on Brooklyn's B63 last year and went live on all buses in Staten Island earlier this month.

The MTA's press release enigmatically states: "the next borough will also come online in 2012," leaving two more boroughs -- which the MTA says will get Bus Time by 2013.

Want to read more about Bus Time? TN's field test of Staten Island's system is here.

 

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Schoolbook

At P.S. 41, College Planning Begins in Pre-K

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Because of a new program P.S. 41 in Staten Island launched earlier this month, the "college" word will be used a lot more within the school’s walls, said Elise Feldman, the principal. The program teaches students about the importance of getting a college education, and it's based on the belief that it's never too early to start planning for it.

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WNYC News

Staten Island to Get Real-Time Bus Information

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

WNYC

The MTA is launching real-time bus information on Wednesday for the entire borough of Staten Island. 

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Schoolbook

Ronald J. Gorsky: Have Passion for Every Student

Monday, December 12, 2011

The principal of a transfer school on Staten Island says his staff provides personal attention to students that is not available at big high schools, serving as the "mom and pop store" to the big-box chain stores. And it shows in the results. "They should be knocking down the door to get here," he says.

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: DC Uses Decoys to Catch Bike Thieves, Toyota Plant Opens in Tupelo, Congress Approves Gateway Tunnel $

Friday, November 18, 2011

Top stories on TN:

For transit agencies, climate change could cost billions. (Link)

House Republicans marry domestic energy drilling to transportation funds. (Link)

Congress zeroes out high-speed rail funding. (Link)

Bike racks outside DC Metro (photo by Palmetto Cycling Coalition via Flickr)

Republicans hail "the end to President Obama’s misguided high speed rail program." (The Hill)

An East Side Access tunnel worker was killed by falling concrete under Grand Central Terminal. (New York Times)

Congress formally approved $15 million for the trans-Hudson Gateway Tunnel; engineering work will now begin. (The Star-Ledger)

DC's transit police are using decoys to catch bike thieves. (Washington Post)

Rethinking public transit, especially in rural areas, doesn't have to be expensive. (New York Times Opinionator)

"Secret" Port Authority bonuses are being investigated by the NY Comptroller's Office. (The Record)

A long-awaited Toyota plant is finally opening in Tupelo, Mississippi. (Atlantic Cities)

Staten Islanders will protest tolls tomorrow. (SILive.com)

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: LA Increases Night Service on Trains, Chicago Area Buses To Drive on Highway Shoulders, Passenger Attacks on Transit Operators On the Rise

Tuesday, November 08, 2011

Top stories on TN:

A new bridge across Lake Champlain opened years ahead of schedule. (Link)

Van driving "rebalancers" keep watch over Capital Bikeshare stations. (Link)

The mass transit commuter tax break is set to expire at the end of the year. (Link)

Image courtesy of Pace Bus

Los Angeles is increasing night service on three rail lines to boost ridership. (Los Angeles Times)

Some buses will be driving on the shoulder next week in the Chicago area, when the region pilots a program designed to speed commuting times. (Chicago Tribune)

San Francisco weighs bus rapid transit on Van Ness Avenue. (The Bay Citizen)

Nearly a third of all drivers said they've almost fallen asleep while driving at least once in the last month, and the problem gets worse when the clocks change. (Washington Post)

Toyota's hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle, which will hit the market in 2015, is expected to retail for about $138,000. (Autopia)

Attacks by passengers on mass transit operators are on the rise, and some say rage over fare hikes is the cause. (Atlantic Cities)

Does Salt Lake City's commuter rail have a higher accident rate than average? Signs point to yes. (Deseret News)

NYC is moving forward with plans to use a San Francisco-like "smart parking" system. (Streetsblog)

The US Supreme Court will hear arguments on whether police need a warrant to attach a GPS tracking device to a suspect's car. (NPR)

The Staten Island borough president says toll relief for NJ-bound drivers may be on the way. (Staten Island Live)

The long-delayed plan to overhaul the George Washington Bridge Bus Station in northern Manhattan is gaining traction with a flurry of leases for its expanded retail space. (Wall Street Journal)

Flood waters in Bangkok are inching closer to the subway. (CNN)

The architecture critic for the New York Times waxes poetic about bike lanes, writes that the city environment is "an urban glory best absorbed, I have come to realize, from a bike."

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Schoolbook

Rose Kerr: Paint the Big Picture

Monday, October 31, 2011

The Staten Island School of Civic Leadership was rated No. 1 on the city's progress report this year, but its principal, Rose Kerr, says it is "every principal and every teacher's challenge" to remember that "a child is not just a test taker.''

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: Staten Island Pols Oppose #7 to Secaucus, Late School Buses Spur Boston Mayor To Action, and Robert Moses Biopic Coming to HBO

Friday, October 28, 2011

Top stories on TN:

Rockland County residents: we want a new Tappan Zee, but we want transit, too. (Link)

LIRR scam could total $1 billion. (Link)

Bay Area seniors go back to school to learn public transit. (Link)

Red light cameras may prioritize money, not safety. (Link)

(photo by Ben Walker via Flickr)

Staten Island elected officials oppose extending the #7 train to Secaucus, want that borough's toll burden lessened. (Staten Island Advance)

BART's board of directors tables talks on a cell phone ban. (San Francisco Chronicle)

As 25% of buses continue to arrive late two months into the school year, Boston's mayor orders oversight. (Boston Globe)

Pennsylvania's governor probably won't push for more transportation funding, despite a committee recommendation. (Philadelphia Inquirer)

A Los Angeles transit fan gets a special welcome from that city's mayor. (Los Angeles Times)

New York Times editorial on LIRR pension scam: So many questions, including: "what fostered such an apparent universal collapse of public servants’ integrity?"

Could bike share come to Beirut? (Daily Star)

A Robert Moses biopic is coming to HBO. Now, who should play him? (Atlantic Cities)

Look! On the streets of Seattle! It's the sperm bike! (Seattle Post Intelligencer)

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: San Diego's Transportation Plan Pleases No One, Metro-North Parking In Short Supply, and Why Are Today's Car Paint Colors So Boring?

Sunday, October 23, 2011

Top stories on TN:

Democrats are trying -- unsuccessfully so far -- to make headway in getting the president's transportation spending package passed. (Link)

A corgi dressed as a NYC bus won a Halloween dog costume contest. (Link)

(photo by Mirsasha via Flickr)

New York Times editorial: we hope Cuomo's appointments to the Port Authority and the MTA mean "the governor is ready to get in the game" -- and that he'll return the administrators' calls.

New York Daily News editorial: MTA head Joe Lhota has to figure out how to stop Albany from raiding transit money and hold the line on fare hikes.

The Bay Area's two dozen transit system face a $25 billion shortfall over the next 25 years. (San Francisco Examiner)

The proposed route for California's high-speed rail will "destroy churches, schools, private homes, shelters for low-income people, animal processing plants, warehouses, banks, medical offices, auto parts stores, factories, farm fields, mobile home parks, apartment buildings and much else as it cuts through the richest agricultural belt in the nation and through some of the most depressed cities in California." (Los Angeles Times)

A NY MTA board member from Staten Island says it's unfair his borough is the only one that has to pay a toll to get off the island, says he wants to toll 12 NYC river crossings. (Staten Island Advance)

Alaskan Way viaduct demolition: it's happening. (Seattle Post Intelligencer)

Also in Seattle: one out of every four roads is in serious disrepair, which critics say is the result of the city's "fix the worst first" policy. (Seattle Times)

San Diego's $214 billion transportation plan pleases neither transit advocates nor drivers. (North County Times)

Parking is in short supply at Metro-North station lots in Connecticut, where the wait list for a parking sticker can stretch past six years. (Wall Street Journal)

Passenger assaults on NYC bus drivers are up 20%. (New York Daily News)

Why were car paint colors so great in the 1960s and 1970s--and why are they so boring now?  (Slate)

 

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Features

The Outer Reaches: Arts Institutions Worth the Trip

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

Here are four arts institutions — all of which will have openings and host events this month — to check out in The Bronx, Staten Island and Southampton: Wavehill, The Bronx River Art Center, The Alice Austen House and The Parrish Art Museum.

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: Port Authority Head Could Be Out, Staten Island's Transit Options, and Atlanta's Transit Vs. Roads Debate

Thursday, September 29, 2011

Top stories on TN:

What does cell phone service on NYC's subways sound like? "I can't hear you over the train!" (Link)

San Francisco's MUNI spent more money on transit -- yet customer satisfaction fell. (Link)

The outgoing head of NY's MTA said his replacement doesn't need to have a transit background. (Link)

 (photo by Kate Hinds)

The head of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey may be leaving next month. (New York Times)

NY's DOT unveiled its short list of Staten Island transit alternatives: light rail, BRT, enhanced bus service. (Staten Island Advance)

Atlanta's 'transit vs. roads' debate "may be about to boil over." (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Regional transportation officials voted to try to buy a new home in an old building in downtown San Francisco -- despite a looming audit over the purchase. (San Francisco Chronicle)

Dept. of Energy report: US should invest more in green auto tech, less on technologies that will take generations to come to market. (Good)

Faster bus service is coming to midtown Manhattan, as the city expands Select Bus Service to 34th Street. (New York Daily News)

A new agreement between GM and auto workers means that up to a quarter of GM's workforce could be 'two-tier' new hires. (Changing Gears)

Streetsblog looks at a March 2011 WNYC interview through a new lens.

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: US Mayors Want Fully Funded Transpo Bill, Toll Hikes Send Staten Islanders Flocking to E-ZPass

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Top stories on TN:

MTA unveils iPad-like informational kiosk at some subway stations. (Link)

Audi is using fraying infrastructure and stupid drivers to sell cars. (Link)

Some NYC parking meters are experiencing second lives as bike racks. (Link)

An aeroponic garden at Chicago's O'Hare Airport

A group of U.S. mayors met with congressional leaders and White House officials to push for a "comprehensive, fully-funded" transportation bill. (The Hill)

New York City's Department of Environmental Protection is investigating a transit-disrupting water main break on Manhattan's Upper West Side. (WNYC)

Bus vs. train: which system does more to help a city? The answer: it depends. (TheStreet)

After this weekend's toll hikes went into effect, Staten Islanders are lining up to buy E-ZPass. (Staten Island Advance)

The pedestrian safety officer program on three East River bridges is costing NYC $80,000 a month. (NY Daily News)

San Francisco BART protesters have gone from wild to mild. (SFist)

St. Paul (MN) businesses, which have been struggling during the Central Corridor light rail construction, may get a financial boost thanks to the project meeting a key deadline. (Minnesota Public Radio)

Chicago's O'Hare Airport now has a no-soil, vertical garden that grows everything from Swiss Chard to green beans, right between Terminals 2 and 3 on Concourse G. (Marketplace)

The Long Island town of Ronkonkoma is seeking a developer for a 50-acre mixed-use hub that would "create new businesses and jobs, expand the property tax base, keep young people from leaving Long Island, encourage the use of mass transit, and create a regional destination." (Newsday)

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Features

WNYC's Guide to 9/11 Arts Events

Friday, September 02, 2011

This month, cultural institutions around the city are paying respect to the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks through literature, visual arts, theater, dance, music, and film. Here's our guide to what's happening around town.

WNYC News

Staten Island Turns 350 Years Old

Monday, August 22, 2011

Monday marks the 350th anniversary of the founding of Staten Island (or Staaten Eylandt, as the Dutch called it). The borough is best known for its iconic orange ferry, the Fresh Kills Landfill and the Verrazano Bridge — but it has a rich history of ship building, boasts the oldest running cricket team in the U.S. and is home to the second oldest house in New York City.

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Features

Countdown to Blast-Off: Preparing for the Macy's Fireworks Show in Staten Island

Friday, July 01, 2011

For the past two weeks, 60 licensed pyrotechnicians have been wiring and packaging over 40,000 firework shells in preparation for the 35th annual Macy's Fourth of July Fireworks show. Check out a slideshow of the team preparing at an undisclosed pier in Staten Island.

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Features

Celebrating the Fourth of July in NYC with Pig Roasts, Urban Foraging, and Improv

Friday, July 01, 2011

Pig roasts, improv marathons, Revolutionary War tours and urban foraging. There's no shortage of things to do in the city this Independence Day weekend. Here's our shortlist of happenings around NYC.

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