Streams

 

Soviet Union

Studio 360

Special Guest: Svetlana Boym

Saturday, February 07, 2004

Kurt Andersen and the writer Svetlana Boym explore how artists worked in the Soviet Union and what it means to them and to us today.

Svetlana Boym is a Harvard professor of Slavic and Contemporary Literature, and the author of The Future of Nostalgia. The book traces nostalgia from its ...

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Studio 360

Cultural Exchange

Saturday, February 07, 2004

For a moment during the Cold War — in the decade between Josef Stalin's death until the Cuban Missile Crisis — something called "Cultural Exchange" formed a warm glow in US-Soviet relations. It started with one pianist in 1955, named Emil Gilels, and led to a sudden mutual discovery of ...

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Studio 360

Lomo

Saturday, February 07, 2004

Twenty years ago in Leningrad, the Soviets developed the Lomo camera as a way to provide Western-style consumer electronics to comrades throughout the Eastern bloc. The Lomo became the standard issue snapshot camera for a generation. A couple of decades later, Western photographers have discovered the ...

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Studio 360

Painting in Pre-Glasnost Russia

Saturday, February 07, 2004

When we think of Soviet Art, we think of the propaganda posters and the figurative heroic paintings and sculpture that glorified the Soviet leaders. That kind of Social Realism dominated official art in Russia, starting in the 1930's. But artists found ways to pursue their own ...

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Studio 360

USSR, Lomo, Stratosphere

Saturday, February 07, 2004

Studio 360 looks back at a country that doesn’t exist any more — the Soviet Union. Kurt Andersen and the writer Svetlana Boym expose the art that was made in secret during the Communist regimes, and find out why some of once-underground artists are nostalgic for those days. Americans remember what it was like when Soviet pianists called a truce at the height of the Cold War. And a cheap Soviet camera finds a growing legion of devoted photographers in the West.

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Studio 360

Theremin

Saturday, July 27, 2002

Electronic-instrument inventor Leon Theremin turns out to be a Russian spy. 

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