Streams

 

Soviet Union

The Leonard Lopate Show

From National Sports Hero To Political Enemy

Wednesday, March 04, 2015

Legendary Soviet and NHL Hockey star Slava Fetisov will be joining us to discuss the documentary he was featured in, "Red Army," which is playing at AMC Loews Village 7.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Harrison Salisbury, The Reporter as Witness to the Truth

Thursday, February 12, 2015

To be uppity, to be contradictory, is the essence of the American system of press freedom.
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The Leonard Lopate Show

How the Soviets Changed Hockey

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Gabe Polsky discusses his documentary "Red Army," along with New York Rangers legend Rod Gilbert and Doug Brown of the New Jersey Devils and Detroit Red Wings.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Unplanned Fall of the Berlin Wall

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Historian Mary Elise Sarotte explains that the opening of the gates on the night of November 9, 1989, was an accident, and looks at the factors that contributed to it.

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The Takeaway

View from the Eastern Bloc: Poland

Friday, April 04, 2014

All this week, The Takeaway is speaking with people who grew up in the Eastern Bloc and asking them to reflect on the crisis today in Ukraine. Today, the voice of someone who grew up under communism in Poland.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

What a New Cold War Could Sound Like

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

One thing about the Cold War: It made for some great radio. 

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The Takeaway

Ghosts of Russian History Still Alive in Europe

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

As Russia flexes its muscles in Ukraine, the present looks all too familiar for many Europeans. For them, the ghosts of Russian history are still alive in the region today. 

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Lenin's Favorite Songs

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

A Soviet hit parade.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Happy Cosmonautics Day, and Other Fascinating Moments From Radio Moscow

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

WNYC tried to bridge the cultural Cold War-divide by periodically airing some Radio Moscow programs.
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WNYC News

The Former Soviet Union in the '90s, in Blue

Saturday, November 23, 2013

One of the leading photographers of the former Soviet Union is showing 40 years of work in New York City.

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The Takeaway

World War II ‘Night Witch’ Dies at 91

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

The Soviet Union’s first all-women division of fighter-pilots in World War II were called "Night Witches" by the Nazis because their plywood and canvas airplanes sounded like witches’ broomsticks, and because they carried out their raids exclusively at night. Nadezhda Popova flew 852 missions with the group. She died last week at the age of 91. Author Amy Goodpaster Strebe explains Popova's legacy, and the forgotten  history of these courageous women fighter pilots.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Diplomatic Impunity: Dean Acheson Counsels Audiences on Disarmament

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

WNYC

In 1958, former Secretary of State Dean Acheson was out of power but not out of opinions. At this Book and Authors Luncheon the influential statesman weighs in on the pressing foreign policy question of the day: our relations with the Soviet Union.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Life Behind the Iron Curtain, 1944–56

Monday, November 26, 2012

Pulitzer Prize-winner Anne Applebaum discusses how Communism took over Eastern Europe after World War II and transformed the individuals who came under its sway. Her history Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944–56 draws on newly opened East European archives, interviews, and personal accounts translated for the first time to show in detail the dilemmas faced by millions of individuals trying to adjust to a way of life that challenged their beliefs and took away everything they had.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Warlords

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Kimberly Marten, Barnard College political science professor and the author of Warlords: Strong-arm Brokers in Weak States, talks about those who impose order in failed states.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Svetlana Alliluyeva's Graceful Defection from the Soviet Union

Thursday, July 19, 2012

In this recording from April 26, 1967, Svetlana Alliluyeva, the daughter of Joseph Stalin, fields a variety of questions from the New York press after leaving her homeland. "I feel like Valentina Tereshkova at her first flight into space," she confesses, referring to the first female cosmonaut.

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The Takeaway

Blacklisted by Putin: Bill Browder Speaks

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Prime Minister Vladimir Putin hopes to return to the president's office in Russia, but he never really gave up any of the power that went with the office. Putin rules Russia with an authoritarian hand and has never been shy about raising it against his enemies, or those he perceives as enemies. William F. Browder knows that perhaps better than anyone.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s Apricot Jam and Other Stories

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Ignat Solzhenitsyn discusses his father Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's Apricot Jam and Other Stories, available for the first time in English. After years of living in exile, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn returned to Russia in 1994 and published this series of stories, all focusing on Soviet and post-Soviet life, illuminating the Russian experience under the Soviet regime.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

Communist Propaganda or Capitalist Commercial? A 1930s WNYC Broadcast is Mired in Controversy.

Friday, March 11, 2011

Moscow's Park of Culture and Rest was one of the topics in a controversial series of travelogues aired by WNYC in late 1937 and early 1938. Critics of the station charged the broadcasts were Soviet propaganda meant to gloss over the dictatorship of Joseph Stalin.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

WNYC Covers the Celebration of Wiley Post's Record Breaking Flight Around the World in 1933

Friday, January 07, 2011

New York Mayor John P. O'Brien* pinned a gold medal on Wiley Post, 'round-the-world flier' on the steps of City Hall, July 26, 1933. Post's wife Edna Mae is on the right behind the WNYC microphone.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Purge

Friday, May 28, 2010

Finnish-Estonian novelist and playwright Sofi Oksanen discusses her novel Purge, an international bestseller that has won Finland’s most prestigious literary awards.

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