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South Korea

The Leonard Lopate Show

International Adoptees, Coming Back Home

Thursday, January 15, 2015

200,000 Korean children were adopted by families abroad over the past sixty years. Now, many of them are coming back. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

'Gangnam Style' and the Global Influence of South Korea

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

South Korea has developed an elaborate strategy to become the world’s number one pop culture exporter.

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The Takeaway

Obama Walks Tightrope Between Asian Allies

Thursday, April 24, 2014

President Obama is walking a tightrope—he must balance U.S. relationships with China, Japan, and South Korea as a huge trade deal hangs in the pendulum. Can the president keep his footing steady?

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The Takeaway

Tensions Rise Between South Korea, China & Japan

Monday, December 02, 2013

Last week, China flexed its muscles by unexpectedly declaring an air defense identification zone in the East China Sea, which touches South Korea and Japan. Now tensions are rising between the nations amid this territorial dispute. Joining us today to discuss what this dispute actually signifies is James Fallows, a national correspondent for The Atlantic magazine who has reported on China extensively.

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The Takeaway

On the Ground in South Korea

Friday, April 12, 2013

After a week of aggressive threats from North Korea, Pyongyang continues to warn of an imminent missile test, possibly on Monday, the birthday of Kim Il-sung, the late founder of North Korea. This week, the BBC’s Dan Damon has been hosting his program "World Update" from South Korea. Dan traveled to the banks of the Imjin River, at the border between North and South where he found a range of perspectives on Peninsula’s conflict.

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The Takeaway

South Korea Walks Back Reports of North's Nuclear Test

Monday, April 08, 2013

South Korea said today that another nuclear test by Pyongyang was imminent, but redacted the report just a few hours later. What's going on?

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The Washington Report

Obama Shoots for Policy Trifecta

Monday, April 08, 2013

A tax and budget deal, an immigration reform deal and restrictions on gun sales. All three   eluded him during his first term, but in the next few weeks, President Obama will try and get movement on all three.  In this week on The Washington Report, David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, talks to Nolan discusses if this policy trifecta will happen.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Tough Talk From North Korea

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

Charles Armstrong, director of the center for Korean Research at Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), discusses Kim Jong Un's threats to South Korea and U.S. and whether it's just bluster or poses a real threat to the region and the United States.

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The Takeaway

U.S. Sends B-2 Bombers on Practice Run Over South Korea

Thursday, March 28, 2013

In a frightening escalation of sabre rattling between the United States and North Korea, two nuclear-capable B-2s made a non-stop trip from the Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri to South Korea — the first time the U.S. military has publicly announced such a mission.

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The Takeaway

South Korea Suffers Major Cyber Attack

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

A widespread cyber attack in South Korea forced the military to "upgrade its surveillance status," according to reports from the BBC. North Korea has been blamed for previous cyber attacks. Lucy Williamson is a correspondent for the BBC based in Seoul, South Korea.

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The Takeaway

Call to Secure Nuclear Material at Seoul Summit

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

World leaders have called for closer cooperation to tackle the threat of nuclear terrorism at a summit on nuclear security in Seoul, South Korea. President Obama is among the world leaders in attendance. At the end of the summit there was a joint call to secure "vulnerable nuclear material". Lucy Williamson, a correspondent for our partner the BBC, joins us to discuss the Seoul summit and Obama's private meeting with Pakistani Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gillani.

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The Takeaway

North Korea Holds State Funeral for Kim Jong-il

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Tens of thousands of North Korean people and soldiers lined the snowy streets of Pyonyang Wednesday for the carefully choreographed funeral procession of deceased leader Kim Jong-il. Kim's son and designated successor, Kim Jong-un, was seen walking alongside the hearse carrying his father's body. North Korea's iron-fisted leader since 1994, Kim reportedly died of a heart attack on December 17 at age 69. Funeral services are scheduled to last for two days.

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The Takeaway

North Koreans Mourn Kim Jong-il

Tuesday, December 20, 2011

North Korean state television broadcast images on Tuesday of Kim Jong-un, the country's presumptive new leader, and senior government officials visiting the body of dictator Kim Jong-il, who died Saturday of at heart attack at age 69. Kim Jong-il's death is only the second time in North Korea's 80 year history that leadership has changed. Kim's father, Kim Il-sung died in 1994. Video that emerged on Monday of North Koreans hysterically grieving has been watched all over the world. John Sudworth of the BBC reports on the latest from Seoul, South Korea.

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The Takeaway

After Kim Jong-il, What's Next for North Korea?

Monday, December 19, 2011

Within hours of announcing North Korean dictator Kim Jong-il's death on Sunday, the country's ruling Workers' Party released a statement saying North Korea would unite Kim's youngest son, Kim Jong-un. Not much is known about Kim Jong-un, who was named his father's heir apparent last year. He is believed to be in his late twenties, and apparently went to boarding school in Switzerland. Whether the younger Kim will be able to maintain control of his country and stick to his father's brand of hard-line Communism remains to be seen. The older Kim left North Korea's economy in shambles, and thousands of people are believed to be starving.

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The Takeaway

A Look at the Life and Legacy of Kim Jong-il

Monday, December 19, 2011

The Takeaway continues its coverage of the death of North Korean dictator Kim Jong-il with a look at his life and legacy with two men who have been close North Korea observers for years. Stephen Bosworth, former U.S. ambassador to South Korea, served as the special representative for North Korea policy. Michael Breen is the author of one of the few English language biographies of Kim, "Kim Jong-il: North Korea's Dear Leader."

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The Takeaway

North Korean Dictator Kim Jong-il Dead at 69

Monday, December 19, 2011

Kim Jong-il, the North Korean dictator who made his isolated country a nuclear power, died on Saturday of a heart attack at age 69. State media kept the death a secret for nearly two days, suggesting a possible leadership vacuum. North Korea's ruling Workers' Party released a statement suggesting that Kim's youngest son, Kim Jong-un, had succeeded his father. North Korea conducted a short-range missile test on Monday, according to unconfirmed reports from South Korea.

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The Takeaway

The Life and Death of Kim Jong-il: North Korea's 'Dear Leader'

Monday, December 19, 2011

He ruled North Korea with an iron fist for 17 years. His infamous isolationism and nuclear ambitions made him a part of George W. Bush's notorious "Axis of Evil." He was one of the last Communist leaders in the world around whom a cult of personality existed. But how Kim Jong-il, the North Korean dictator, will be truly be remembered by his people is yet to be seen. Referred to as "Dear Leader," Kim sank his country into deep famine and ravaged its economy. Though media images out of North Korea may show people weeping in the streets, it's hard to know whether there is real grief behind the tears.

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Features

New Photo Exhibit by Ahae Opens in Grand Central Station

Friday, October 14, 2011

Visitors and passerby to Grand Central Station can now take a look through a window in South Korea. For "Through My Window," the photographer Ahae took more than a million pictures through the window of his house, which overlooks an organic nature preserve in South Korea.

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Transportation Nation

President Heads for Michigan To Argue Auto Industry Bailout Saved State

Friday, October 14, 2011

President Barack Obama Drives a Volt During a Michigan Visit in July 2011 (White House Photo)

UPDATED WITH UAW PRESIDENT  COMMENTS ON TRADE AGREEMENT:

President Barack Obama is on his way to Michigan with South Korean President Lee Myung-bak, where the two will tour the GM Assembly plant that produces the new Chevy Sonic subcompact.   The argument that the auto bailout early in his presidency was good for Michigan, the auto industry, and the U.S. is not an argument the president is willing to lose.

"At the beginning of his administration, President Obama made the very tough and unpopular decision to restructure GM and Chrysler – a decision that saved over a million American jobs and revitalized an entire American industry,"  according to materials on the visit released by the White House.  "In the year before GM and Chrysler filed for bankruptcy, the auto industry shed over 400,000 jobs.  Since these companies emerged from their restructurings, the American auto industry has created 128,000 jobs."

The President has to thread a narrow needle here -- arguing both for the political wisdom bailout and for the recently-passed trade agreements with South Korea, Colombia and other nations.  The White House argues the agreements will create jobs, though free trade agreements have not exactly thrilled labor unions, as a whole.

To counter that, the White House released an op-ed penned by UAW Chief Bob King.

" The UAW fully supports this trade agreement because the automotive provisions, which are very different from those negotiated by President George W. Bush in 2007, will create significantly greater market access for American auto exports and include strong, auto-specific safeguards to protect our domestic markets from potentially harmful surges of Korean automotive imports," King wrote.

"Unlike the 2007 negotiations with South Korea, the labor movement, and particularly the UAW, had an opportunity to be part of the 2010 discussions on strengthening the trade deal. Working with U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk and other members of the Obama administration, then-Ways and Means Committee Chairman Levin and top management from the auto companies, the UAW believes the new agreement will help protect current American auto jobs, contains meaningful trade law enforcement and makes stronger labor and environmental commitments."

As we've reported before from Michigan, the politics of the auto bailout are tricky -- people do see it creating jobs, but, as with the bank bailout, it's hard to swallow big corporations getting handouts when you're totally broke yourself.   Two years after the bailout, Democrats lost key Michigan races in a rout.

Nevertheless, the President and his team have argued again and again that the bailout was wise, and he'll do so again today.

We'll have more on his remarks later.

 

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The Washington Report

WQXR's The Washington Report

Monday, February 28, 2011

NYT's David Sanger discusses the continued revolts in Libya and whether the pro-democracy movements could spread to North Korea.