Streams

South Dakota

The Takeaway

The Story Behind the World's Largest T-Rex

Thursday, August 14, 2014

About 24 years ago, the research team at the Black Hills Institute of Hill City, South Dakota made one of the greatest paleontological finds in history when it discovered the largest, most complete Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton ever found. But with many great finds among the vast acreage of the West, one man's claim is often subject to seizure.

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The Takeaway

South Dakota Pleads for Farm Bill Extension

Friday, December 13, 2013

In October, an early blizzard killed tens of thousands of cattle in South Dakota and Nebraska. Ordinarily after this kind of turmoil farmers can expect disaster relief funding through the Farm Bill—but this year that relief is in limbo. Joining The Takeaway to discuss the importance of the Farm Bill is Gary Cammack, a South Dakota Republican state representative and a rancher who lost more than 100 of his own cows and calves in the storm. 

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The Takeaway

What Makes Our Cities Unique: The Corn Palace

Monday, March 04, 2013

Whether you were born in a city or you relocate for personal reasons, it's often the norm that you find yourself identifying with the city and its traditions. Is your city more unique than the next or do you fall into the category of commonness?

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The Takeaway

The Country's First Voter?

Thursday, October 04, 2012

Wayne Gilbert listened to The Takeaway in his hometown of Rapid City yesterday morning and heard Jerry Bloomer from Hot Springs say that he voted at 9:30 a.m. MST on September 21st. Wayne voted an hour earlier that day. Could he be the country's first voter?

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The Takeaway

How Important Is Early Voting?

Monday, October 01, 2012

Election day is still more than a month away, but early voting has already begun. Voters in South Dakota and Idaho began casting their ballots on September 21, while voters in Iowa lined up outside polling stations late last week. In the upcoming weeks, dozens more states will open their voting booths.

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The Takeaway

South Dakota Sioux Tribe File Voting Discrimination Case

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Members of the Oglala Sioux tribe live on the very rural Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, most of whom do not have cars. Traveling during winter months is compounded by infrequently plowed gravel and dirt roads. Given that their county only has six days of early voting in the presidential primaries — while residents in the rest of South Dakota have 46 days to vote — some Ogala have perceived this as discriminatory. 25 tribe members are suing the overseer of the elections, South Dakota secretary of state Jason Gant as well as county officials.

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Transportation Nation

TN Moving Stories: The Death of ARC, South Dakota Enforces 24/7 Sobriety for DWI Offenders, and Federal Employees' Commuting Tax Credit Is Set To Expire

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

ARC tunnel killed again. (WNYC)

South Dakota program aims to stop drunk driving by enforcing sobriety, 24/7. (The Takeaway)

NJ Transit launches "My Bus" program; passengers can now use text messages to find out when the next bus will arrive. (Jersey Journal)

NY's MTA board set to approve toll hikes today (NY1). Watch the board meeting live this morning at 9:30!

Federal employees who have enjoyed a big break in their commuting costs since early last year, thanks to the stimulus law, may enjoy it no longer--unless Congress acts before the end of the year. (Washington Post)

San Francisco area to begin what they say is the nation's first regional bike sharing program--1,000 bikes to be available in the city and along the Caltrain corridor in San Jose, Palo Alto, Mountain View and Redwood City. (San Francisco Chronicle)

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Transportation Nation

Senators Now Crossing the Aisle for Electric Car

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

(Washington, DC - Todd Zwillich, Transportation Nation) Lawmakers are hoping for a chance to give the electric car a jolt in the Senate’s upcoming energy bill.

A bipartisan group of senators are pushing a new round of incentives and cash designed to speed development of long-range batteries and plug-in stations that could finally start to push the US transportation fleet away from fossil fuels.

No one expects it to happen quickly. Most lawmakers and experts expect it will take decades before a significant proportion of Americans are driving plug-in hybrids or electric cars.

The Promoting Electric Vehicles Act of 2010 throws $1.5 billion in research and development grants to high-tech battery firms.

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