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South America

The Takeaway

Accusations Fly in Wake of Argentine Prosecutor's Mysterious Death

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

An Argentine prosecutor was found dead of a self-inflicted gunshot just days after he accused President Kirchner of shielding Iranian suspects in the nation's deadliest terror attack.

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Latino USA

Nuestro Nueva York

Friday, August 15, 2014

Each week, Latino USA brings you diverse stories that matter from around the nation. In this special episode, we zoom in and check out the vibrant Latino landscape of our hometown: New York City.

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NYPR Archives & Preservation

WNYC and WQXR: Pioneer Broadcasters of Latin American Music

Thursday, July 17, 2014

It started at WNYC, ended up at WQXR and packed a south of the border beat.
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Radiolab

Look What You've Done, North America!

Thursday, July 25, 2013

When the Isthmus of Panama connected North and South America, two independent dynasties of horses, rhinos, elephants, shrews, weasels, cats and dogs were free to mingle, fight, dominate or die. Who won?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Álvaro Uribe Velez

Monday, October 08, 2012

Álvaro Uribe Velez, president of Colombia from 2002 to 2010, talks about leading the country’s transformation from a “failed state,” besieged by drug kingpins, terrorist groups, and extreme poverty into a far more peaceful, stable, modern democracy. His book No Lost Causes  reveals how President Uribe dealt with the FARC, restored the rule of law across the country, and gives a behind-the-scenes look at dealings with various world leaders.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Winemakers and the Rebirth of Malbec

Thursday, May 31, 2012

Ian Mount describes the nefarious scams, brilliant business innovations, and backroom politics that put Malbec on the map. For generations, Argentine wine was famously bad, but in 2001, a Cabernet Sauvignon/Malbec blend beat all contenders in a blind taste test featuring Napa and Bordeaux’s finest. The Vineyard at the End of the World tells the 400-year history of how Argentina became a wine mecca.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Brazil

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Joseph Leahy, Brazil bureau chief for the Financial Times, talks about Brazil's economy, its rising global profile, and President Dilma Rousseff and her recent visit to the United States. We’ll also look at preparations for both the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 summer Olympics.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

President Ricardo Lagos and Chile’s Fight for a Democratic and Prosperous Future

Thursday, January 26, 2012

President Obama recently called Chile “a model for the region and the world.” Ricardo Lagos, president of Chile from 2000 to 2006 talks about his country's rise on the world stage. In The Southern Tiger: Chile’s Fight for a Democratic and Prosperous Future, Lagos chronicles Chile's journey from terror and repression under General Pinochet to an open society with a thriving economy.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: What OWS Can Learn From Argentina

Thursday, December 08, 2011

In the late 1990s, Argentina spiraled into a recession not unlike our own. That economic crisis also spawned the “piquetero movement,” where activists pioneered a system of strategic roadblocks as a form of protest. Nikolas Kozloff, author of Revolution! South America and the Rise of the New Left, discusses what the piqueteros did and didn’t accomplish and what lessons Occupy Wall Street can learn from the movement.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Hugo Chávez

Thursday, June 30, 2011

Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez has been governing his country for the last month from a hospital bed in Cuba. Nikolas Kozloff, author of the book Hugo Chávez: Oil, Politics, and the Challenge to the United States, looks at the Chavez presidency and how he has maintained his grip on power.  

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Bringing Down the Cali Cartel

Friday, June 24, 2011

Investigative reporter William C. Rempel tells the story of former Cali cartel insider Jorge Salcedo, an ordinary man forced to risk everything to escape the powerful and treacherous Cali crime syndicate. Rempel’s book At the Devil's Table: The Untold Story of the Insider Who Brought Down the Cali Cartel tells how Jorge Salcedo, a part-time soldier, engineer, respected businessman, and family man, joined the Cali cartel and became the head of security for its principal godfather. After receiving an order that he can’t obey—but can’t refuse—Jorge realizes that his only way out is to bring down the biggest, richest crime syndicate of all time.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Rediscovering Machu Picchu

Monday, June 20, 2011

Mark Adams describes the discovery of Machu Picchu and his own investigation into allegations that the Yale professor who discovered the ruins, Hiram Bingham III, was not the hero he’s made out to be. Turn Right at Machu Picchu: Rediscovering the Lost City One Step at a Time retraces Adams’s journey to Machu Picchu, with a crusty, antisocial Australian survivalist and several Quechua-speaking, coca-chewing mule tenders as his guides. The book will be released June 30.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism

Monday, April 25, 2011

Peter Mountford talks about his debut novel, A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism. It tells the story of Gabriel, who, on his first assignment for a hedge fund goes to Bolivia at the end of 2005 to seek out insider information on the plans of the controversial president-elect. If he succeeds, it means he’ll get a bonus that would make him secure for life. But standing in his way are his headstrong mother, who is a survivor of Pinochet's Chile, and Gabriel's new love interest, the president's passionate press liaison. Gabriel sets in motion a terrifying plan that could cost him the love of all those he holds dear.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: The Chiquita Papers

Thursday, April 14, 2011

It has long been known that Chiquita Brands International made controversial payments to violent guerilla and paramilitary groups in Columbia in the 1990s and 2000s. The company was fined $25 million dollars in a 2007 plea-agreement for making payments to AUC, which was designated as a terrorist group by the US State Department in 2001. Michael Evans, chief researcher on Colombia at the National Security Archive, explains that a newly released trove of internal Chiquita memos obtained by the National Security Archive suggest that, contrary to company claims that the money was extorted, the payments often resulted in direct benefits for the banana giant.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: U.S. Extradites Colombian Paramilitaries and Seals their Case Records

Thursday, September 30, 2010

Since 2006, the United States has extradited more than a dozen Colombian paramilitaries, only to seal the records of their court cases. On this week’s Underreported, Jennifer Janisch and Oriana Zill de Granados of PBS’s Wide Angle series, explain how they discovered that the cases, and what the use of judicial secrecy here in the U.S. means for their Colombian victims seeking justice.

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