Streams

 

 

South America

The Takeaway

Prosecutor Drafted Arrest Warrant for Argentine President Before His Death

Friday, February 06, 2015

New evidence in Argentine prosecutor Alberto Nisman's mysterious death has turned up in the form of an arrest warrant he had drafted for President Kirchner. 

Comments [1]

PRI's The World

Colombia's undercover, anti-groping squad is patrolling public buses in Bogota

Friday, September 12, 2014

Women around the world often feel vulnerable to groping and sexual harassment when they ride on crowded public transit. And it can be hard to catch offenders. So the police in Colombia's capital, Bogota, have created a new squad of mostly female officers to catch those who harass — and to support female riders.

Comment

PRI's The World

Caracas is finally ending the 'world's tallest squat'

Friday, September 12, 2014

The "Tower of David" in downtown Caracas is called "the world's tallest squat" because thousands of people have been living in the unfinished skyscraper. Now, the government is moving people to new housing outside the city — and many squatters have mixed feelings.

Comment

PRI's The World

Immigration fuels a hot Asian fusion food scene in Lima

Friday, September 05, 2014

Ever heard of "nikkei" and "chifa" cuisine? Neither had food writer Steve Dolinsky, until he went to Lima, Peru. They're a mashup of Asian and Peruvian tastes, created by immigrants.

Comment

PRI's The World

The release of 'Popeye,' a trusted assassin for Pablo Escobar, enrages many Colombians

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Cocaine kingpin Pablo Escobar was killed more than two decades ago, but one of the last surviving members of Escobar’s ultra-violent Medellin cartel just became a free man. The release of John Jairo Velásquez, who left prison on August 19, has sparked controversy in Colombia.

Comment

PRI's The World

It turns out turtles have something to say

Monday, August 18, 2014

Experts used to believe that turtles were entirely mute and deaf. But that turns out to be false, according to researchers in Brazil who say they have recorded turtle vocalizations for the first time.

Comment

PRI's The World

Brazil's presidential campaign has all the drama of the country's famed telenovelas

Monday, August 18, 2014

The presidential election in Brazil was completely shaken up last week. One of the candidates died in a plane crash, right after a debate. Now his running mate is soaring in the polls.

Comment

PRI's The World

A Brazilian company bids to become Chiquita's orange knight

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

American banana giant Chiquita has been planning a merger with Fyffes, an Irish rival, since March. But a $611 million offer from a Brazilian orange juice company might derail the deal.

Comment

PRI's The World

How an American scientist helps grandmothers in Argentina find their ‘stolen’ grandchildren

Thursday, August 07, 2014

For three decades, Mary-Claire King has led efforts to improve genetic technologies that can be used to identify the stolen children of Argentina’s Dirty War. Her partnership with The Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo has yielded remarkable results.

Comment

PRI's The World

A grandmother in Argentina finds her grandson after nearly 40 years

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Estela de Carlotto has been searching for her grandson for 36 years. He was stolen during the Dirty War in Argentina. Now, after nearly four decades she has found him.

Comment

PRI's The World

The new Argentine debt crisis resurrects painful memories and fears of economic disaster

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Argentina defaulted for the second time in 13 years after last-ditch talks with US hedge funds collapsed. Many Argentines worry that unless a deal is reached, another default could crash the peso and lead to inflation and unemployment.

Comment

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Edward Barrett Considers Anti-American Sentiment in Latin America

Wednesday, February 06, 2013

WNYC

The violent anti-American demonstrations occasioned by Vice President Richard M. Nixon's recent trip to Latin America are the subject of this 1958 International Interview with Edward W. Barrett, dean of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism.

Read More

Comments [1]

Soundcheck

Chicha Libre: In Studio

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Brooklyn grooves meet South American folk dances in the music of Chicha Libre. This group of armchair travelers is the house band at the Brooklyn club Barbes, now celebrating its 10th birthday with a new record called Canibalismo. The band invades Manhattan to play live in our studio.

Comments [4]

The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Japan, Egypt, AT&T

Monday, March 21, 2011

Operation Odyssey Dawn began Saturday with coalition missiles targeting Moammar Gadhafi's tanks and air defenses. Is the United States leading this effort? Meanwhile, relief and rescue efforts continue in Japan and time is of the essence as over 12,000 people are still missing and 8,000 have been confirmed dead so far. 

Comment

The Takeaway

Saving Amazonian Trees with Cold, Hard Cash

Wednesday, December 09, 2009

The Brazilian government is trying a new scheme to cut its carbon emissions and slow down the rate of deforestation in the Amazon. It's planning to do that by PAYING local communities to protect forests and stop cutting down trees. BBC Brazil reporter Paulo Cabral has been to visit the first trial project in the Juma reserve, which contains 1 million acres and is home to over 300 families.

During a visit there, he found the approach is changing the attitudes of local people. "The key drivers of deforestation are poverty and lack of education," Amazonas State Governor Eduardo Braga told him. "Don’t ask for one mother and one father to keep one standing tree if their kid is crying because they’re going to say ‘I’m going to save my kid and I don’t care about this tree.'"

Comment

The Takeaway

Argentina's First Gay Marriage Blocked at Last Minute

Tuesday, December 01, 2009

A judge blocked Latin America's first gay marriage at the last minute today in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The last-minute reversal highlights the divided opinion on gay marriage in predominantly Catholic Latin American culture. We get the latest from BBC’s South America correspondent, Candace Piette, live from Buenos Aires.

Comment

The Takeaway

Colombia Opens Military Bases to US

Friday, October 30, 2009

Colombia will sign a deal with the United States today to give the American military access to seven of its military bases. The deal has been in the works for months, and it has raised concerns among several South American countries. BBC correspondent Jeremy McDermott joins us from Bogota, Columbia, to talk about the implications of this deal.

Comment

The Takeaway

Honduran President Zelaya Expected to Return

Friday, October 30, 2009

The political crisis in Honduras may soon be coming to an end. After weeks of negotiations, ousted President Manual Zelaya could soon return to power. We speak with Marcelo Justo in the BBC's South America bureau.

“This [was] a very modern version of a coup d’etat with a lot of institutional back-up for it. So now there’s been an agreement which [previously] seemed impossible … Latin America seemed to have left behind all this era of coup d’etat and has basically supported the idea of institutional and democratic reforms.”
—Marcelo Justo in the BBC's South America bureau, on the potential return of ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya after an atypical coup d'etat

Comment

The Takeaway

Get On The Bus, Gus: Bus Rapid Transit Takes Hold

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

With shrinking budgets and expanding populations, cities across the globe are desperate for cheap mass transit. From Johannesburg to Jakarta to Cleveland, city governments are choosing Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)— a bus system that acts like a train but with no tracks or rails. The Takeaway talks to freelance reporter Steven Dudley, who explored the successful BRT system in Bogota, Colombia, and to Dan Moulthrop, reporter for WCPN, Cleveland Public Radio, where the city has been making the transition to a Bus Rapid Transit system.

To see the buses in action, watch the film below:

Comment

The Takeaway

Awaiting a verdict in human rights trial of Peruvian President Fujimori

Tuesday, April 07, 2009

After a fifteen-month long trial, a verdict is expected today in the trial of former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori on charges of human rights abuses. This is the first time an elected Latin American president has been tried for human rights abuse. Fujimori is accused of ordering two massacres that killed 25 people. He denies the charges, but faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted. Mr. Fujimori is currently serving a six-year prison term for abuse of power. Joining us for more is James Painter, Latin American analyst for the BBC's World Service.

Comment