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Sound

To the Best of Our Knowledge

A Cassette From My Ex

Sunday, April 05, 2015

Before there was iTunes, Spotify, or Pandora, there was the mixtape. Jason Bittner is nostalgic for those days, when sweethearts would spend days crafting the perfect playlist. He's the editor of a book and former website called "Cassette From My Ex". He shares some songs from his collection, and explains why the mixtape is such a powerful medium.

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Storycorps

StoryCorps 415: Lucky in So Many Ways

Monday, February 23, 2015

Bill Jones, the first single man in California to successfully adopt a child, tells his friend Stu Maddux about his son, Aaron.

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The Takeaway

Hit That Track: Listening Back to The Origins of Recorded Sound

Thursday, February 05, 2015

A new exhibit at the Smithsonian allows us to hear Alexander Graham Bell's earliest sound recordings for the first time. 

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99% Invisible

148- The Sizzle

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

The first trademark for a sound in the United States was issued in 1978 to NBC for their chimes. MGM has a sound trademark for their roaring lion, as does 20th Century Fox for their trumpet fanfare. Harley Davidson tried to trademark the sound of their...

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

What About Public Radio?

Sunday, January 11, 2015

What might the growing popularity of podcasts mean for public radio? Are they competition? Inspiration? We turned to one content director--who's also launched a few podcasts--for a little insight. 

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Alex Blumberg on Our Podcast Future

Sunday, January 11, 2015

Alex Blumberg used to be a producer for This American Life. He also co-founded NPR's Planet Money. But he's left public radio to launch his own podcast production company, called Gimlet Media. They've already got two podcasts out, with a third on the way. He says, with smart phones and Wi-Fi enabled cars, people have more opportunity to listen to what they want, when they want.

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99% Invisible

127- The Sound of Sports

Monday, August 11, 2014

Way back in October 2011 (see episode #38, true believers!), we broadcast a short excerpt of a radio documentary produced by Peregrine Andrews about faking the sounds of sports on TV broadcasts. It was one of our most popular and provocative programs e...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: The Science of Sound

Friday, June 06, 2014

Acoustics, how sound works, and hunting for the world’s strangest sounds.

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The Takeaway

Have We Found the Line Between Sound and Noise?

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Sorting noise from music, street soundtrack from din is an old argument. 'Noise' can be cancelled with fancy new headphones. But is the canceling of noise also the erasing of culture?

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Exploring New York's Past Through Sound

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Emily Thompson, historian at Princeton University and the author of Soundscape of Modernity: Architectural Acoustics and the Culture of Listening in America, 1900-1933, talks about her study of sound and her website featuring sounds of New York City in the 1920's.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Coping with NYC's Noise

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Arline Bronzaft, environmental psychologist on the board of GrowNYC, talks about the effects of noise and offers practical advice for dealing with it. Alan Fierstein, an acoustic consultant and the owner and founder of Acoustilog, joins her to share tales of noise mitigation from the 5,000+ jobs he's handled.

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Radiolab

Weekend Special: Name That Sound!

Monday, December 23, 2013

I'm going to play you a sound that you hear all the time. But this time, instead of hearing it in context (in a familiar setting — the movies, an Xbox, on TV, in a phone), it's all alone. Naked. Will you be able to identify it?

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Radiolab

The Power of Music

Thursday, November 28, 2013

The physical and psychological power of music... from a Disco hit that saves lives, to Beethoven's drive to push listeners to the brink.

 

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The Takeaway

Noise: The Defining Sounds From Human History

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

History is visual: You can see a photo from a century ago, visit a room filled with artifacts, and even gaze at paintings in an ancient cave where humans stood 30,000 ago. But what would it sound like to live in those times? David Hendy has a good idea. He is a professor of media and communication at the University of Sussex, and he's in love with noise—but not in the way you might think.

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Listen to Lucy

Competence beats confidence every time

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Competence beats confidence every time

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Radiolab

What It's Like To Drop 150,000 Feet Straight Down

Monday, July 29, 2013

If I say "meet me 28 miles from here," that doesn't seem very far, right? But what if the 28 miles is not on a road or a highway, but straight up? Take a trip with a space shuttle solid rocket booster as it tumbles back to Earth. Headphones on.

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Radiolab

Who Does A Better Wave? Sports Fans Or Hippos?

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Professor William Barklow was on vacation when this happened. He was in Tanzania sitting on a river bank gazing about, when all of a sudden a hippopotamus pushed its head out of the river right in front of him, opened its huge mouth and bellowed.

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Soundcheck

Exploring 100,000 Years Of Human Noise

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

This week on Soundcheckwe want to know how you block out noise in your day to day life. A recent BBC 4 radio series, Noise: A Human History, examined how noise has shaped civilization for the past 100,000 years. Professor David Hendy, the host and writer of that series calls in from BBC studios in Oxford, England to explain his method of telling the story of noise.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Hearing and Sound

Friday, February 08, 2013

For this week’s Please Explain, the Leonard Lopate Show finds out how we process all the sounds we hear every day—from the hum of the heater to the wail of sirens to music to speech—and how it shapes our brains and behavior.

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Soundcheck

Exploring 3-D Sound with Adam Gopnik

Thursday, January 24, 2013

In his latest story for the New Yorker, staff writer Adam Gopnik explores the science behind the human experience of music. It all started when Gopnik realized a profound difference in the way he and his teenage children listen to music. While Gopnik and his peers grew up solemnly listening to long-form LPs on superb stereo systems, his kids "snatch at" smaller bits of music via earbuds and laptops. As he told Soundcheck's John Schaefer: "I would say, 'I can't listen to this on that lousy speaker on your computer!'"

A desire to understand this generational gap led Gopnik on a journey that spans rocket science, psychology and sociology, which he documents in his New Yorker piece, "Music To Your Ears: The Quest For 3-D Recording and Other Mysteries of Sound."

Gopnik describes visiting the lab of Edgar Choueiri, a rocket scientist determined to create a method of listening to sound in three dimensions. Choueiri allowed Gopnik to test out his “magic box” with a song of Gopnik’s choice: the Rolling Stones’ “Beast of Burden.” The experience, says Gopnik, was thrilling.

“[He] plugged it in,” he recounts, “And suddenly, there it was, Keith Richards is stabbing away with a cigar in his mouth you could practically hear on my right, and Ronnie Wood was plucking away in that kind of syncopated way he does…. Mick Jagger was somewhere right in front of me, and Charlie Watts passively was keeping time right behind my head. I had been inserted into the center of the Stones. It was a startling, uncanny experience.” 

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