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Sopa

New Tech City

New Tech City: Computer Fraud and Abuse Act: Is It Too Broad?

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Jordan Kovnot is the privacy fellow at the Fordham Center on Law and Information Policy.

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On The Media

Aaron Swartz

Friday, January 18, 2013

On January 11, 26-year-old hacker, programmer, and activist Aaron Swartz committed suicide. He had a history of depression and faced federal prosecution for downloading millions of articles from the online academic article repository JSTOR. Brooke talks to Gawker's Adrian Chen, who wrote about Swartz's legal troubles this week.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act

Thursday, April 26, 2012

The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, or CISPA, is a controversial surveillance bill currently making it ways way through the House of Representatives. Declan McCullagh, chief political correspondent and senior writer at CNET, explains the bill, and why privacy advocates are so alarmed by it.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Congress This Year: Like Last Year, Only Worse

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

For all the bad that happened last year, most everything that led to gridlock isn't going anywhere, and in many cases will be worse.

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Soundcheck

Convoluted Copyright

Monday, January 23, 2012

Copyright made big headlines last week. File-sharing site Megaupload was shut down following a dramatic FBI raid. The Protect IP Act (PIPA) and the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) generated widespread web protests, resulting in a postponement of both bills. And the Supreme Court upheld a decision to restore copyright to works that previously had been part of the public domain - like Prokofiev's "Peter and the Wolf." We'll break down these convoluted stories with our go-to copyright expert, intellectual property lawyer Jon Reichman.

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The Takeaway

File-Sharing Site Megaupload Shut Down by FBI

Friday, January 20, 2012

Megaupload.com one of the world's most popular file-sharing sites was shut down yesterday on charges that it illegally shared movies, TV shows, and e-books. A federal indictment accuses the company of costing copyright holders at least $500 million in lost revenue. In retaliation hacker groups went after several Web sites including those of the Justice Department and Universal. Ira Rothken is a lawyer for Megaupload.com.

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: GM Once Again World's Largest Automaker, LA Reaches Out to China to Fund Transit, NY Area Airport Terminals Among World's Worst

Friday, January 20, 2012

Top stories on TN:
Union Suspends Talks with NY MTA Over Contract (Link)
Children in Low-Income Manhattan Neighborhoods More Likely To Be Hit By Cars (Link)
MTA: Subway Blasting Not Creating Pollution (Link)
D.C. Metro Workers Charged in Coin-Stealing Scheme (Link)
Rural College Campuses Solve Student Transportation Challenges With Shuttles — And Bikes (Link)

photo by sciascia via Flickr

General Motors reclaims the title of world's largest automaker. (Detroit Free Press)

Federal safety regulators lack the expertise to monitor vehicles with increasingly sophisticated electronics, says one agency. (New York Times)

L.A. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa spoke with a Chinese investment group about funding for a dozen transportation projects. (Los Angeles Times)

But what happened to the opossum after he rode the D train? (New York Times)

More information emerges from Capital Bikeshare data. Most common trips? Bike lane usage? It's in there. (Greater Greater Washington)

Opinion: Obama Throws SOPA and Keystone Red Meat to Liberals (It's a Free Country)

Watch a bicycle get stripped down on NYC's mean streets over the course of a year. (Video)

What's the best way to get users to embrace mass transit? (Slate)

New Jersey is preparing to use facial-recognition technology to scan 18 million photographs for signs of driver's license fraud. (AP via NJ.com)

Airport terminals at three New York-area airports are among the world’s 10 worst, according to travel group Frommer’s. (WNYC)

Road rage bleeds over to the bipeds in Canada: pedestrian bites driver. (CBC)

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The Takeaway

The Implications of Internet Shutdowns

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Wikipedia and several other websites participated in an online "blackout" on Wednesday in protest over SOPA and PIPA, anti-piracy bills that would allow the government to fine or blacklist sites accused of copyright violations. The message of the blackouts have come across not just to the online community, but with members of Congress — some who, like Republican Senator Marco Rubio, withdrew their support of the bill. But the blackouts bring up broader questions about the implications of shutting down the Internet as a form of protest.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Obama Throws SOPA and Keystone Red Meat to Liberals

Thursday, January 19, 2012

It's rare for environmentalists to cheer loudly for this president, and add to it the administration's carefully-worded objections to SOPA and PIPA, and you see a president who has decided to re-excite those whose enthusiasm carried him to victory four years ago.

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The Takeaway

Reddit Co-Founder Alexis Ohanian on SOPA Shutdown

Thursday, January 19, 2012

More than 7,000 websites shut themselves down on Wednesday in a one-day protest of the anti-piracy bills now in Congress. The blackout has some U.S. lawmakers thinking twice about voting for the bills. The Protect IP Act, or PIPA, lost support from two former co-sponsors, Republican Senators Marco Rubio and John Cornyn. Reddit.com's co-founder, Alexis Ohanian, talks about why his website joined in on the blackout and if he thinks it was a success.

 

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WNYC News

Techies Rally Against Anti-Piracy Bills

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Internet freedom activists rallied outside the Third Avenue offices of Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, calling on them to drop their support for controversial legislation aimed at curtailing online piracy.

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It's A Free Blog

Opinion: Online Piracy Bill Threatens Innovation, Web Freedom

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Hidden behind the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)'s relatively benign name are rules that go far and beyond past what a copyright holder needs to stop file sharing of the material they own.

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The Takeaway

A World Without Wikipedia

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

The anti piracy laws being considered in the U.S. have produced worldwide internet turmoil. Perhaps you are already aware that the giant Wikipedia website in English is down not because of some pirates, but in protest to what the Wikipedia people think this would do to the internet. Well Wikipedia's message today is that we in the 21st century world community need the open architecture of the internet and sites like Wikipedia. Just check out what it is like suddenly not to have them.

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The Takeaway

A Positive Spin on SOPA and PIPA

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Wednesday sites like Wikipedia and Reddit pulled the plug for 24 hours to protest the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and Protect IP Act (PIPA), acts that threaten the existence of such sites. SOPA is up for heated debate not only in congress, but online also. Steve Tepp, who represents the working man in Hollywood, and Scott Harbinson, who deals with movie business clients, discuss why they support SOPA and PIPA.   

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The Takeaway

SOPA Being Challenged Online and in the White House

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Last Friday, President Barak Obama issued a statement announcing that he would not lend his support for the Stop Online Piracy Act, known as SOPA, citing concerns over First Amendment rights and cyber security risks. Introduced last October in Congress, SOPA would give content providers wide reaching powers to shut down websites distributing copyrighted materials. 

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On The Media

US Government Seizes Domain Names

Friday, December 09, 2011

Since the summer of 2010, the US Office of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has been seizing the domain names of websites around the world that it believes have engaged in copyright infringement or sold counterfeit goods. Mark Lemley, a lawyer defending one of the websites seized by the government, talks to Bob about whether ICE has the legal authority to make these seizures and how they might be netting sites that haven't done anything wrong.

The Dodos - Companions

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