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Somalia

The Leonard Lopate Show

One Man's Fraught Journey From Somalia to South Africa

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

In January 1991, when civil war came to Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia, two-thirds of the city’s population fled. Among them was eight-year-old Asad Abdullahi. 

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PRI's The World

The US war on ISIS will look a lot like the American role in Yemen and Somalia

Thursday, September 11, 2014

When the US responded to terrorism after 9/11, it used troops and massive force in the Middle East. The new war declared last night by President Obama against the terrorist organization know as the Islamic State, or ISIS or ISIL, will look very different.

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The Takeaway

U.S. Carries Out Raids in Libya & Somalia

Monday, October 07, 2013

Over the weekend, U.S. military personnel conducted targeted operations in Libya and Somalia. As a result of the Libya operation, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said that one of the world's most wanted terrorists was captured and is now in U.S. custody. Congressmen Adam Schiff represents California’s 28th district and is a member of the House's Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. He discusses the military operation and its significance.

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The Washington Report

U.S. Military Raids in Somalia and Libya; and the Ongoing Government Shutdown

Monday, October 07, 2013

Kerry Nolan talks with New York Times Chief Washington Correspondent David Sanger about this past weekend's raids. They also look at the partial shutdown of the federal government as it enters its second week.

The Takeaway

U.S. Carries Out Raids in Libya & Somalia | Another Blockbuster Term for the Supreme Court | Edgar Allan Poe Exhibit Reveals “The Terror of the Soul”

Monday, October 07, 2013

U.S. Carries Out Raids in Libya & Somalia | Treasury Secretary Jack Lew: There Are The Votes to End the Shutdown | President of Iceland on the Future of the Arctic | Edgar Allan Poe Exhibit Reveals “The Terror of the Soul” | Another Blockbuster Term for the Supreme Court | ...

The Takeaway

The Mogadishu Restaurant Owner Who Won't be Stopped by Terrorists

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Five years ago, Ahmed Jama, a successful restaurant owner in London, left his life in the U.K. to open a restaurant in his hometown of Mogadishu. Jama now owns several popular restaurants across Somalia's capital, but being a restaurant-owner in Mogadishu means contending with constant attacks from Al Shabab. Xan Rice is the West Africa correspondent for the Financial Times. He profiles Jama in this week’s issue of the New Yorker.

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The Takeaway

Al Shabab Attacks: Did the International Community Drop the Ball?

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Was the international community lulled into a sense of false security about the Al Shabab militant group because of some perceived military setbacks on the ground in Somalia and elsewhere in East Africa? Joining us to discuss this is Jendayi Frazer, former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs. She is currently a Distinguished Public Service Professor at Carnegie Mellon University.

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The Takeaway

Al-Shabab: Who & Why?

Monday, September 23, 2013

The siege at the Westgate shopping center in Kenya's capital, Nairobi, is in its third day. At least 62 people have been killed since the assault began on Saturday. The attack is linked to the al-Qaeda-backed Somali terror group Al-Shabab. Joining us from Kenya is Nicholas Kulish, East Africa Correspondent for our partner The New York Times, and in Washington J. Peter Pham, director of the Africa Center at the Atlantic Council.

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The Takeaway

A Story of Kidnapping and Survival in Somalia

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

It was August 23, 2008 when journalist Amanda Lindhout and her partner Nigel Brennen were were kidnapped in Somalia.They remained in captivity for 460 days. Amanda Lindhout is the author of a new book about her experience called “A House in the Sky” and she joins The Takeaway to discuss her experience.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Doctors Without Borders Leaves Somalia

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Humanitarian aid group Doctors Without Borders announced earlier this month that it will withdraw from operations in Somalia. And last week, it revealed that medical centers were flooded with patients showing signs of exposure to toxic nerve agents around the time of the alleged chemical weapons attack in Syria. Sophie Delaunay, Executive Director of Doctors Without Borders in the United States, talks about these recent developments, as well as the challenges and ethics of providing medical care in war-torn countries.

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On The Media

Somalia's Child Journalists

Friday, April 05, 2013

In Somalia the relative calm and stability of the last few years has resulted in a burgeoning journalism scene. But the practice is a deadly one, journalists are targeted for offending powerful interests, and most experienced journalists have fled. NPR's East Africa correspondent, Gregory Warner, talks to Bob about who's stepped in to do the incredibly risky reporting in Somalia - children.

 

Kronos Quartet - Mai Nozipo

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Aid Work in Somalia, Bankers and the Economic Meltdown, DA Miscontuct

Thursday, April 04, 2013

Dr. Hawa Abdi, who has been called the Mother Teresa of Somalia, talks about turning her farm into a camp for 90,000 internally displaced. Washington Post economics reporter Neil Irwin on how the world’s top central bankers steered the global economy through the economic meltdown. ProPublica reporter Joaquin Sapien talks about his investigation into why the city’s district attorneys are rarely disciplined for misconduct.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Dr. Hawa Abdi, the Mother Theresa of Somalia

Thursday, April 04, 2013

Dr. Hawa Abdi has been called "the Mother Teresa of Somalia." Since 1991, when the Somali government collapsed, famine struck, and aid groups fled, she has dedicated herself to providing help for people whose lives have been shattered by violence and poverty. In her new memoir, Keeping Hope Alive: One Woman: 90,000 Lives Changed , she talks about founding a camp for internally displaced people located outside war-torn Mogadishu, Somalia. She also tells of being kidnapped by radical insurgents, who also destroyed much of her hospital, because she was a woman. She, along with media pressure, convinced the rebels to let her go, and she demanded and received a written apology. She's joined by her daughter, Dr. Deqo Mohamed.

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On The Media

The Week in Drones

Friday, February 08, 2013

This week saw a fount of new information come to light about the US government's controversial and secretive drone program. Brooke talks to Stanford Law professor James Cavallaro, author of the Living Under Drones project, in which law students conducted interviews in northwest Pakistan to better understand the full impact of our lethal drone strikes.

 

Yo La Tengo - Cornelia and Jane

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On The Media

Combatants and "Combatants"

Friday, June 01, 2012

According to an article in The New York Times last week, the Obama administration treats “all military-age males in a strike zone as combatants”. Brooke talks to Chris Woods, reporter for the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, who has been working with reporters on the ground to confirm and put names to civilian casualties of drone strikes, about the discrepancies between his reporting and the reports of the US government.

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The Takeaway

US Bank Blocks Transfers to Somalia

Monday, December 26, 2011

On Friday, Somali authorities pleaded with U.S. officials to ease restrictions on wire transfers to the region after Sunrise Community Banks of Minnesota announced plans to halt the service. Due to the large number of Somalians living in that state, Sunrise handles many of these transactions. The U.S. views wire transfers to the Horn of Africa as risky because of terrorism concerns, yet thousands in famine-ravaged Somalia are dependent of them.

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The Takeaway

Musician K'Naan On Returning to Somalia After Twenty Years

Monday, December 26, 2011

In September, musician and poet K'Naan wrote an op-ed about returning to his native Somalia for The New York Times. He had left the country, which is in the grip of a devastating famine and violent civil war, twenty years earlier, fleeing with other members of his family for safety in Canada. He came on the show to discuss this in September.

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Transportation Nation

TN MOVING STORIES: Republicans Grill LaHood About High-Speed Rail, MTA Testfies about Winter Storm Readiness

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

Top stories on TN:

NY Governor Cuomo's deal on the MTA's payroll tax won't cut its budget--yet. (Link)
Following a drunk driving arrest last weekend, FAA head Randy Babbitt resigns. (Link)
HOT lanes deal for I-95 in Northern VA was announced. (Link)
A new poll says Californians would vote to kill high-speed rail funding. (Link)

A NYC bus stuck in the aftermath of the 12/26/10 blizzard (photo by John Chevier via Flickr)

House Republicans "treated Ray LaHood’s high-speed rail program like a piñata" at yesterday's hearing. (Politico/MT)

The prime minister of Somalia is back on the job in New York's Department of Transportation. (New York Times)

NYC transit officials told City Council they forgot about a stranded subway train during last year's blizzard. (New York Times)

The new head of New York's MTA is facing his first big labor relations test. (Gotham Gazette)

Are parking maximums as bad for New York City as real estate developers say they are? (Atlantic Cities)

More than half of Americans oppose body scanners because of cancer fears. (ProPublica)

Scottish politicians said they'd pay for high-speed rail if Parliament builds a network north of Birmingham. (Guardian)

Princeton's plan to add an arts and transit hub to the neighborhood moved one step closer to reality. (NJ.com)

More than 110 House members from both sides of the aisle sent a letter to the White House supporting a six-year transportation bill. (New York Times)

A Swedish group is offering insurance for fare beaters. (Atlantic Cities)

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The Takeaway

A Reporter on Covering Famine in Somalia

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

Sometimes, it is a reporter's personal connection to a place or a person that makes the story a reality to those reading it, though they may be far disconnected from the events on the ground. That is certainly the sense one gets from reading Jeffrey Gettleman's latest piece on the devastating famine that has ravaged the Horn of Africa. In today's paper, The New York Times East Africa bureau chief writes about his struggle to reconcile covering one of the worst humanitarian disasters of all time as a reporter with his desire to help the masses he's watched suffer.

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The Takeaway

Somali-American Man is Alleged Suicide Attacker

Tuesday, November 01, 2011

Over the weekend, two suicide bombers carried out an attack on African Union troops in Mogadishu, Somalia. Ten people were killed. The man allegedly responsible? A 22-year-old Somali-American man named Abdisalan Hussein Ali. He's not the first Somali-American to leave the U.S. and return back to Somalia to join a terrorist group called al Shabab. Zuhur Ahmed hosts a radio program that serves the community that Ali came from. Her show is called Somali Community Link and it broadcasts on Takeaway affiliate station KFAI in St. Paul, Minnesota. She has been discussing the case on her program.

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