Streams

 

Soldiers

The Takeaway

Missing WWII Airmen Buried After 70 Years

Monday, March 02, 2015

Decades after World War II, the remains of nine missing U.S. military airmen are finally coming home from New Guinea. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

John McCain with Veterans Stories

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

U.S. Senator John McCain shares the stories of 13 soldiers who fought in America's wars, from 1776 through the Iraq War.

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Storycorps

StoryCorps 401: On the Home Front: Veteran's Day 2014

Friday, November 07, 2014

Retired Army Sgt 1st Class Max Voelz first recorded in 2011 to remember his wife, Staff Sgt Kim Voelz. They met on Valentine’s Day, while training to work in Explosive Ordinance Disposal–the Army’s elite bomb squad.

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Storycorps

StoryCorps 398: His Other Family

Friday, October 24, 2014

Shirley Parrello speaks with former Marine Sergeant Kevin Powell, who was with her son Lance Corporal Brian Parrello when he was killed in Iraq in 2004.

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Storycorps

StoryCorps 396: Pray for Me

Friday, October 17, 2014

Paul Braun, a Sergeant with the Minnesota Army National Guard, and his interpreter, Philip, remember working together in Iraq.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Robert K. Brown, Soldier of Fortune

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

Robert K. Brown, former Green Beret, who was kicked out of Special Forces twice, talks about finding his true calling as a publisher. He launched an upstart magazine called Soldier of Fortune, which pushed the bounds of journalism to its limits. His book I Am a Soldier of Fortune: Dancing with Devils tells his own story, taking the readers into combat zones with him and his daring combat journalists. 

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WNYC News

Can Lessons on Gun Control be Gleaned from the Military?

Friday, February 08, 2013

Speaking to soldiers about firearms, no matter what their individual views are on gun control, one thing becomes clear: they take them seriously.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

TBI, Soldiers, and Veterans

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Traumatic brain injury is among the so-called invisible wounds of war, and in September, the Pentagon announced it is devoting $10 million to new efforts find better ways to treat and prevent mild traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder among soldiers and veterans. Col. Jamie B. Grimes, National Director of the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, and Dr. Ross Zafonte, Clinical and Research Leader for Traumatic Brain Injury at the Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Home Base Program, discuss the effects of traumatic brain injury among soldiers and veterans and new research and treatment.

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The Takeaway

Coalition Joint Operations Strategy Scaled Back in Afghanistan

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Since the drawdown of troops began last summer, the American mission in Afghanistan has been clear: train Afghan troops. But after a string of deadly attacks on NATO personnel by rogue Afghan security forces, that mission, at least temporarily, has changed.

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The Takeaway

James Wright and "Those Who Have Borne the Battle"

Monday, May 14, 2012

Just as our views of war in general have changed, so has our relationship with our soldiers and our veterans. James Wright is a former marine, the former president of Dartmouth College, and the author of “Those Who Have Borne The Battle: A History of America’s Wars and Those Who Fought Them.”

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The Takeaway

Baghdad ER: A Unique Vantage of the War in Iraq

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

This Sunday marks three months since the last U.S. military convoy left Iraq. Few places were better witnesses of the effects of the war on citizens than Ibn Sina Hospital in Baghdad’s Green Zone, which is perhaps most familiar to Americans for its emergency room, known as Baghdad ER. Each day, the American-run Baghdad ER treated anyone who came to its door with life-threatening battle injuries. On October 1, 2009, the U.S. government returned management of the hospital to Iraq.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Captain Travis Patriquin and the Awakening of Iraq

Tuesday, January 03, 2012

William Doyle tells the story of Captain Travis Patriquin and his role in turning the tide of violence in the Iraq war. An Arabic linguist, Patriquin set out to establish a crucial network with tribal leaders.  In 2006, he unleashed a diplomatic and cultural charm offensive—the Sunni Awakening, the tribal revolt against Al Qaeda that led to a dramatic drop in violence. A Soldier's Dream: Captain Travis Patriquin and the Awakening of Iraq is a tribute to him.

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WNYC News

Remains of NJ Soldier Dumped in Landfill

Friday, December 09, 2011

Gari-Lynn Smith was instructed not to open the casket that held the remains of her husband, Sergeant First Class Scott Smith, who was killed in 2006 by a roadside bomb in Iraq, so she ordered an autopsy report to get closure.

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The Takeaway

A Military Reaction to Leaving Iraq

Monday, October 24, 2011

On Friday, President Obama announced that all U.S. troops will withdraw from Iraq by the end of the year. The U.S. had a long-standing agreement to withdraw its combat troops from Iraq by the end of 2011, but officials from both countries had discussed the possibility of maintaining a residual force of tens of thousands of troops to train Iraqis and fulfill other duties. Those plans fell through when Iraq refused to grant American troops legal immunity in Iraqi courts.

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Selected Shorts

Selected Shorts: The Things They Carried

Sunday, September 18, 2011

Tim O’Brien’s stirring and poignant tale of foot soldiers in the Vietnam War shapes this entire program.

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The Takeaway

Walter Reed Medical Center to Close, After Over 100 Years of Care

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

The Walter Reed Army Medical Center will close its doors, after more than a century of care. The historic medical center first opened it's doors to offer care to soldiers and their families in 1909. The hospital treated Presidents Nixon and Eisenhower. and housed a number of other Washington notables. But it also had its share of scandals. In 2007, a Washington Post investigation uncovered appalling conditions there, including neglected patients, unsanitary living facilities, and what the paper described as "a messy bureaucratic battlefield."

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The Takeaway

United Arab Emirates Hires Blackwater Founder

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Erik Prince, the founder of Blackwater Worldwide has found work for his new company, Reflex Responses, helping to build a mercenary army for the United Arab Emirates. There are questions about the legality about such a project — an American training foreign soldiers without the U.S.'s approval. Kateri Carmola, an associate professor of political philosophy at Middlebury College in Vermont, explains why this is such an explosive move.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Back from Iraq

Friday, November 26, 2010

David Finkel, national enterprise editor of The Washington Post and author of The Good Soldiers, talks about spending time with U.S. soldiers in Iraq and upon return after their service.

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WNYC News

New York City Honors Veterans at 91st Annual Parade

Thursday, November 11, 2010

An estimated 20,000 people, including about 3,000 active duty servicemen and women, marched up Fifth Avenue to mark Veterans Day. Participants included veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as the conflicts in Vietnam, Korea and World War II.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Junior Officers’ Reading Club

Tuesday, September 07, 2010

Patrick Hennessey, Jr., gives an account of his coming of age as a young enlistee, staving off the tedium and pressures of army life in the Iraqi desert by creating a book club. In The Junior Officers’ Reading Club: Killing Time and Fighting Wars, Hennessey captures how boys grow into men amid the frenetic violence, frequent boredom, and overwhelming responsibilities that frame a soldier's experience.

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