Streams

 

Sociology

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Immigrant Bargain

Monday, October 08, 2012

Sociologist Vivian Louie examines whether today's immigrants, especially Latinos, are integrating into American society as well and as successfully as their European counterparts did in the 19th and 20th centuries. Louie’s book Keeping the Immigrant Bargain examines the lives of 37 foreign-born Dominican and Colombian parents and their 76 young adult offspring, looking at how they are adapting to American schools, jobs, neighborhoods, and culture.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hidden America

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Jeanne Marie Laskas tells stories of coal miners, migrant laborers, ranchers, air traffic controllers, landfill operators, long-distance truckers, and even cheerleaders. Her book Hidden America: From Coal Miners to Cowboys, an Extraordinary Exploration of the Unseen People Who Make This Country Work is a tour of the often overlooked people who are crucial to keeping the country running.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Why Some Politicians Are More Dangerous than Others

Thursday, August 16, 2012

Psychiatrist and author James Gilligan explains his findings that in times of high unemployment, recession, and other forms of social and economic distress, the United States has experienced high rates of violent death, including suicide and homicide. His book Why Some Politicians Are More Dangerous than Others demonstrates why he believes that politicians and the political process, even in democratic countries, can have tragic consequences for everyone.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Dan Ariely tells the Truth about Dishonesty

Wednesday, June 06, 2012

Behavioral economist Dan Ariely explores how unethical behavior works in the personal, professional, and political worlds, and he argues that irrational forces often determine whether we behave ethically or not. In The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone—Especially Ourselves Ariely shows why some things are easier to lie about; how getting caught matters less than we think; and how business practices pave the way for unethical behavior, both intentionally and unintentionally.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

So Long, Farewell

Tuesday, June 05, 2012

Do we short-change good-byes to start anew? MacArthur prize-winning sociologist and Harvard education professor Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot asks this question in her new book Exit: The Endings That Set Us Free, as she explores how we leave one thing and move on to the next.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Jonathan Haidt on The Righteous Mind

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Social psychologist Jonathan Haidt explores the origins of our divisions, from our intuitions to our morality to our “groupishness.” In The Righteous Mind he investigates Why our political leaders can’t seem to work together to deal with threats and problems and why people so readily assume the worst about their fellow citizens.

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The Takeaway

New Study Shows Growing Rate and Acceptance of Interracial Marriage

Friday, February 17, 2012

In 1958, Mildred and Richard Loving were arrested in their own home, in the middle of the night, for the crime of miscegenation. When the Supreme Court declared miscegenation laws illegal in 1967, 16 states still had such laws on the books. A new poll released this week by the Pew Research Center shows just how far we’ve come in the five decades since the Lovings’ arrest. 15 percent of new marriages in 2010 crossed racial or ethnic lines, double the rate from 1980. And a great majority of Americans say they would readily accept an interracial marriage in their family.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Solo Life

Tuesday, February 07, 2012

Eric Klinenberg, NYU sociologist and author of Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone, discusses why living alone is on the rise--and why it is so appealing.

LISTENERS: Do you live alone? What do you find surprisingly appealing about living solo? Do you feel more plugged-in to the city or not? Tell us the pros and cons of living alone. Call us or comment here!

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The Takeaway

A Dictionary of American Dialect

Thursday, February 02, 2012

If you've got a copy of the Dictionary of Regional English, you know that "hotdish" is a casserole-style meal popular throughout Minnesota. A "quahog" is common word for "clam" in New England. And "Euchre" is a card game beloved by Midwesterners of all stripes. Next month the final volume of the Dictionary of American Regional English, or DARE, will be released by the Harvard University Press.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Stay-At-Home Kids

Friday, January 27, 2012

 Katherine Newman, professor of sociology at Johns Hopkins University and the author of The Accordion Family: Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents, and the Private Toll of Global Competition, studies adult children in 6 countries living with their parents for economic reasons.

professor of sociology at Johns Hopkins University and the 
author of
The Accordion Family: Boomerang Kids, Anxious Parents, and the Private Toll of Global Competition

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The Takeaway

A 'Poor Black Kid' Responds to Gene Marks

Friday, December 16, 2011

According to the U.S. Census figures from 2010, one in four African-Americans live in poverty. Less than one in five has a college degree. The question of how to help the community be upwardly mobile has been debated for decades, and it was on the mind of commentator Gene Marks when he wrote a recent commentary for Forbes called "If I Were a Poor Black Kid." "If I was a poor black kid I would get technical. I would learn software," Marks wrote. "I would learn how to write code. I would seek out courses in my high school that teaches these skills or figure out where to learn more online. I would study on my own. I would make sure my writing and communication skills stay polished." Gene Marks is neither black, nor poor, and some people wondered why he would be giving advice to those who are.

Most recently on the internet - after an a commentator for Forbes-dot-com wrote an opinion piece called "If I were a poor black kid" ... Gene Marks argues that black kids can escape poverty by making sure they work hard at school to get good grades, become tech savvy and do their homework over the internet

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The Takeaway

Marriage Rate Hits an All-Time Low

Thursday, December 15, 2011

A Pew Research Center report released Wednesday shows 51 percent of all adults in the United States are now married — a record low. In 2010, a survey also conducted by Pew found that four in ten Americans thought marriage had become obsolete, but found that most people who had never married (61 percent) would like to do so someday.

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The Takeaway

New Book Takes on Teens and the Culture of Sex

Tuesday, November 01, 2011

Sociologist Amy Schalet was born in the United States, but she grew up in the Netherlands. When she returned to U.S. for college, she was surprised to learn that most of her American-reared peers had never discussed sex with their parents. Most of her Dutch friends had open, long-running discussions with their parents on the topic. This discovery shaped Professor Schalet's research through graduate school and beyond. She's published her findings in a new book, "Not Under My Roof: Parents, Teens and the Culture of Sex."  

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The Takeaway

Sex and Teenagers: One Family's Story

Tuesday, November 01, 2011

Later this morning, The Takeaway will speak with sociologist Amy Schalet about her new book, "Not Under My Roof: Parents, Teens, and the Culture of Sex." Schalet compares American and Dutch families, and their attitudes about teenage sex. Beth Brotz, a parent in California, was thrilled to learn about Schalet's work. She talks about how she and her husband handled her teenage daughter's confession that she was sexually active with her boyfriend, and how their openness made them closer as a family.

Comments [4]

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Maid's Daughter

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Mary Romero, professor of Justice Studies and Social Inquiry at Arizona State University and author of The Maid's Daughter: Living Inside and Outside the American Dream, tells the story of Olivia, who comes to the U.S. to live with her mother, and encounters the difficulty of growing up around privilege she doesn't share.  

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Common Sense

Friday, September 16, 2011

Common sense seems simple enough, but it can be more complicated and less helpful that you would expect. Duncan J. Watts, sociologist and Yahoo! Principal Researcher, explains the benefits and limitations of common sense and looks closely at how common-sense reasoning can be misleading. His book Everything You Know Is Obvious once You Know the Answer draws on the latest scientific research and real-life examples to show how common sense attempts to predict, manage, and manipulate social and economic systems often fail, and looks at the implications in politics, business and everyday life.

If you have a question about common sense, or some examples of when it works and when it fails, call us at 646-829-3985, or leave a comment.

Comments [5]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Getting Wasted: Binge Drinking and College Culture

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Thomas Vander Ven, associate professor of Sociology and Anthroplogy at Ohio University, talks about his new book on the college culture, Getting Wasted: Why College Students Drink Too Much and Party So Hard.

Comments [25]

The Brian Lehrer Show

Bike Messengers and the City

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Urban bike messengers are a devoted bunch with their own subculture. Jeffrey L. Kidder, assistant professor of sociology at Northern Illinois University and a former bike messenger, discusses his new book Urban Flow: Bike Messengers and the City. 

Comments [10]

The Takeaway

'Lip Service': A Simple Smile's Dramatic Consequences

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Babies start to smile at around five weeks old; an ability that can influence many things they'll do for the rest of their lives. Social psychology research finds that the way we smile seriously affects how we're perceived by others. Jurors are more likely to believe smiling defendants. Smiling waiters get more tips. And parents are likely to pay more attention to smiling children.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Immigrants Raising American Citizens

Monday, July 04, 2011

Hirokazu Yoshikawa, professor of education in Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, talks about the nearly four million children born in this country to undocumented immigrant parents, and looks at how the circumstances they are being raised in adversely influence their development. Immigrants Raising Citizens is based on data from a three-year study of infants from undocumented immigrant families, and includes important implications his findings have for immigration policy, labor law enforcement, and the structure of community services for immigrant families.

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