Streams

 

Sociology

To the Best of Our Knowledge

Race and Crime

Sunday, February 01, 2015

At the heart of many Americans' fear of black men is an ugly stereotype -- the stereotype of the black criminal. Historian Khalil Gibran Muhammad traces some of our current attitudes about race and crime to the late 19th century, when sociologists first began looking at crime statistics.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Hidden Structural Engineers Who Keep Our Buildings Up, and Other Invisible Professionals

Monday, September 01, 2014

Fact-checkers, anesthesiologists, U.N. interpreters, structural engineers. In an age of constant self-promotion, anonymous work remains integral to public successes.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Everyday Interactions Foster Debate, Compromise and Healthier Communities

Thursday, August 07, 2014

The more we become socially isolated individually, the more our society as a whole suffers, argues Marc Dunkelman.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Invisible Professionals Who Make the World Go Round

Monday, July 07, 2014

Fact-checkers, anesthesiologists, U.N. interpreters, structural engineers. In an age of constant self-promotion, anonymous work remains integral to public successes.

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WNYC News

Pigeons: Flying Rats or Friends?

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Sociologist Colin Jerolmack set out to write a thoughtful book on the changing cityscape — something like Jane Jacobs’ seminal The Death and Life of Great American Cities. But that was before a pigeon pooped on him.

He’d been observing changes in a pocket park near Carmine Street on the ...

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On Being

Jaroslav Pelikan — The Need for Creeds [remix]

Thursday, April 24, 2014

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On Being

[Unedited] Jaroslav Pelikan With Krista Tippett

Thursday, April 24, 2014

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Parenthood and Poverty in the Inner City

Monday, April 07, 2014

For this week’s installment of our series Strapped: A Look at Poverty in America, Kathryn Edin and Timothy J. Nelson examine the problems of extreme poverty in cities like Camden, NJ (the poorest city in the country), Baltimore, and Philadelphia. The also investigate a number of the questions many have about the urban poor, such as: How do single mothers survive on welfare? Why were so many low-income women having children without marrying, when doing so seems so difficult? Where are the fathers and why do they disengage from their children’s lives? Why don’t more people work? Their book Doing the Best I Can: Fatherhood in the Inner City is based on a multi-year ethnographic study of black and white low-income, unmarried fathers in inner-city Philadelphia and Camden and shows how major economic and cultural shifts have transformed the meaning of fatherhood among the urban poor.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Why Are there So Many More Angry White Men?

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

Sociologist Michael Kimmel examines the demise of the white American male voter as a dominant force in the political landscape. In his book Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era, Kimmel locates this increase in anger in the economic, social and political shifts that have transformed the country.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Malcolm Gladwell; Jewish Practice in 2013; Interracial Friendships

Friday, November 29, 2013

We’re replaying some of your favorite segments on this Black Friday. We’ll start with a recent conversation about the nature of Jewish identity and practice with Jane Eisner of The Forward. Plus: Amir Ahmad Nasr talks about how the Internet opened his mind about his own faith; Malcolm Gladwell of The New Yorker discusses his new book, David and Goliath, and the way uneven challenges shape our society; and Baratunde Thurston and Tanner Colby talk about the state of interracial friendships in 2013, including their own.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Education in NJ; Iran Diplomacy; Internet Reigns

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

The 30 Issues in 30 Days series continues with Education Week. We’ll look at the education issues at play in the gubernatorial and US senate races in New Jersey. Plus: New York’s Attorney General Eric Schneiderman talks about his investigation into fraudulent positive reviews on services like Yelp; and Santa Clara Law Professor Eric Goldman explains a new California law about “erasing” content posted by minors online. Then, an update on the diplomatic situation with Iran from Robin Wright, of the Woodrow Wilson International Center and the Washington Post, and the Wall Street Journal’s Farnaz Fassihi. And Columbia University’s Sudhir Venkatesh on his new book about New York’s underground economies and illicit markets.

The Brian Lehrer Show

After Sandy: The Seminar

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

NYU sociologist Eric Klinenberg, author of Going Solo and Heat Wave, is joined by two graduate students to discuss their research into NYC's response to climate change and Hurricane Sandy. Liz Koslov, a doctoral student in Media, Culture, and Communication at NYU, talks about her research in coastal Staten Island, where residents are trying to figure out if the government will buy them out of their homes, and at what price. Sociology doctoral student Jacob Faber explains his work on the geography of Sandy's impact, in terms of flooding, access to public transit and problems with electricity and sewage.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Birth Control Costs; Forgoing a Mirror; Cultural Conflict; DSM Woes

Friday, May 03, 2013

The price of birth control pills depends on what pill you use and where you buy it. A new collaboration between WNYC and Clear Health Costs reveals some of these price disparities. Plus: what going without a mirror taught sociologist and author Kjerstin Gruys; how to get past culture clash; the problems with the DSM; and Franchesca Ramsey on social media etiquette.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Playing to Fail

Monday, April 22, 2013

Jesper Juul, visiting assistant professor at New York University Game Center, blogger, and author of The Art of Failure: An Essay on the Pain of Playing Video Games (The MIT Press, 2013), argues that the value of video games isn't in winning, but in learning how to lose. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Why Social Life Has Overshadowed Academics At Many Colleges

Monday, April 15, 2013

Sociologists Laura Hamilton, of the University of California, Merced, and Elizabeth A. Armstrong, of the University of Michigan, co-authors of Paying for the Party: How College Maintains Inequality (Harvard University Press, 2013) share the results of their five-year study of female undergraduates and their disheartening conclusion that college fails to provide social mobility.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

When to Think Quick, When to Think Slow

Monday, April 08, 2013

Daniel Kahneman, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his work in psychology and author of Thinking, Fast and Slow (now in paperback), shares his insights into the brain's two modes of thinking and what that can explain about things like jury deliberations, risk, sports streaks, and the 'irrational exuberance' of capitalists.

→ Event: Daniel Kahneman will be appearing with Joshua Foer at the Union Square Barnes and Noble tonight at 7:00 p.m

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Working Together

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Richard Sennett, distinguished visiting scholar of the University of Cambridge, and author of Together: The Rituals, Pleasures and Politics of Cooperation, argues that working together is a craft that can be strengthened. He explores the nature of cooperation and why it is undervalued as a skill.

 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Jared Diamond: Learning From The Past

Monday, January 07, 2013

This interview originally aired live on January 7, 2013. An edited version was re-aired on August 9, 2013 as part of a special episode of The Brian Lehrer Show. 

Jared Diamond, professor of geography at the University of California, Los Angeles, discusses his latest book, The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn From Traditional Societies?, and talks about how we can learn from the differences between modern life and traditional societies that still exist today.

→ EVENT: An Evening with Jared Diamond. Monday, January 07, 2013 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. at the New School Tishman Auditorium, Alvin Johnson/J. M. Kaplan Hall, 66 West 12th Street. (Sold Out, but information about no-show seating here.)

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Beyond 'Eggheads': Vance Packard Pulls Back the Curtain on Advertising, 1958

Wednesday, December 05, 2012

WNYC

At this Books and Authors Luncheon, Vance Packard tries to dispel the idea that his book, The Hidden Persuaders (1957), is merely about the quirks and absurdities of advertising's use of "motivational research." 

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The Takeaway

Child Poverty on the Rise in the United States

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Poverty is on the rise in the United States and has been during the last decade, especially among children. Since 2001 child poverty rates have increased by 4.7 percent. Krissy Clark, the senior reporter for Marketplace's Wealth and Poverty Desk, is covering the implications of child poverty in the United States. 

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