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Society And Culture

The Leonard Lopate Show

Social Media and Modern Life

Wednesday, January 04, 2012

Sree Sreenivasan, Dean of Student Affairs and digital media professor at Columbia Journalism School, discusses the role of social networking in modern life and the media, for better or worse.

Is your professional life integrated into your social media life? Have you found that helpful or harmful to your career?

Have you attempted to turn off your online life? Have you been successful?

Give us a call at 212-433-9692, or leave a comment, to let us know!

Comments [28]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Michael Pollan's Illustrated Food Rules

Monday, January 02, 2012

Michael Pollan talks about the latest edition of his book Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual, this one includes illustrations by Maira Kalman. It’s a guide for eaters, which presents rules for eating wisely, many drawn from a variety of ethnic or cultural traditions. He discusses local food, organic food, the cost of food, the benefits of cooking at home, and how he came up with the food rules he recommends.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Civilization: The West and the Rest

Monday, December 26, 2011

All over the world, more and more people work for Western-style companies, study at Western-style universities, vote for Western-style governments, take Western medicines, wear Western clothes, and even work Western hours. Historian Niall Ferguson looks at Western civilization’s rise to global predominance in Civilization: The West and the Rest, he argues that, beginning in the fifteenth century, the West developed six concepts that the rest lacked: competition, science, the rule of law, consumerism, modern medicine, and the work ethic.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Lives and Times of Dorothy Thompson and Rebecca West

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Susan Hertog discusses Dangerous Ambition: Dorothy Thompson and Rebecca West New Women in Search of Love and Power, which chronicles these two women writers who achieved unprecedented fame and influence at tremendous personal cost. American Dorothy Thompson was the first female head of a European news bureau, a columnist and commentator with a tremendous following. Rebecca West, an Englishwoman, was a journalist, literary critic, novelist, and historian. They were drawn to ambitious men.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Two Women of Little Rock

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

David Margolick tells the story of Elizabeth Eckford and Hazel Bryan Massery, two women whose names might not be well known, but whose image surely is. The famed photo taken of them in September 1957 shows Elizabeth, a black high school girl, dressed in white, walking in front of Little Rock Central High School, while Hazel, a white girl standing directly behind her, face twisted in hate, screams racial epithets. In Elizabeth and Hazel: Two Women of Little Rock Margolick tells the story behind the photograph, which captures an epic moment in the civil rights movement.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Inside a Slaughterhouse

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Political scientist Timothy Pachirat talks about working undercover for five months in a Great Plains slaughterhouse where 2,500 cattle were killed per day—one every twelve seconds. His book Every Twelve Seconds is an examination not only the slaughter industry but also of how, as a society, we hide violent labor.

Comments [12]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Art and Science of Waiting on Line

Monday, December 12, 2011

The holidays involve a lot of standing on line—in museums, at the movies, and, of course, at stores. Wall Street Journal reporter Ray Smith discusses the science of lines, looking at what’s really happening at checkout. His article “Find the Best Checkout Line” appeared in the Wall Street Journal December 8. He’s joined by Narayan Janakiraman an assistant professor of marketing at Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona who has researched how impatient shoppers get while waiting on line.

Comments [24]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Epidemiology of Mass Incarceration

Monday, December 05, 2011

Public health scholar and Soros Justice Fellow Ernest Drucker argues that imprisonment has become an epidemic in this country, a destabilizing force that undermines families and communities, damaging the very social structures that prevent crime. Drucker spent 20 years treating drug addiction and another 20 studying AIDS in some of the poorest neighborhoods of the South Bronx and the world, and he uses the public health and epidemiological concepts in his book A Plague of Prisons: The Epidemiology of Mass Incarceration in America.

Comments [17]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Life with Joseph Heller

Friday, December 02, 2011

Erica Heller tells about growing up with her iconic father, Joseph Heller, and the rest of her family, which could be by turns caring, infuriating, and exasperating, and anything but dull. Her memoir, Yossarian Slept Here: When Joseph Heller Was Dad, the Apthorp Was Home, and Life Was a Catch-22, details the Hellers’ charmed but turbulent lives.

Comments [2]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Tolstoy: A Russian Life

Friday, December 02, 2011

Rosamund Bartlett talks about the life and legacy of Leo Tolstoy. At the time of his death, he was the most famous man in Russia, with a growing international following, and more revered than the tsar. Bartlett’s biography, Tolstoy: A Russian Life is a portrait of the brilliant, maddening, and contrary man who made a lasting impression on literature and culture.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Caryl Phillips on Race, Culture, and Belonging

Friday, November 25, 2011

Born in St. Kitts and brought up in the UK, Caryl Phillips has written about and explored the experience of migration for more than 30 years through his novels, plays, and essays. In Color Me English: Thought About Migrations and Belonging Before and After 9/11 he reflects on the shifting notions of race, culture, and belonging before and after the September 11 attacks.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

1493: How Columbus Created a New World

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Charles Mann explains how Christopher Columbus changed the world when he set foot in the Americas, setting off a series of vast ecological changes as European vessels carried thousands of species across the oceans. 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created, is a new history of the Columbian Exchange, the reason there are tomatoes in Italy, oranges in Florida, chocolates in Switzerland, and chili peppers in Thailand, and explains how earthworms, mosquitoes, and cockroaches; honeybees, dandelions, and African grasses; bacteria, fungi, and viruses; and rats were moved across the globe, changing lives and landscapes.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Tenth Parallel: Where Christianity and Islam Collide

Thursday, November 24, 2011

Award-winning investigative journalist Eliza Griswold talks about the tenth parallel—the line of latitude 700 miles north of the equator—the geographical and ideological front line where Christianity and Islam collide. In The Tenth Parallel Griswold looks at Nigeria, the Sudan, Somalia, Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines—places where religious conflicts are also conflicts about land, water, oil, and other natural resources, and where local and tribal issues are often shaped by religious ideas.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Harvey Araton on the Golden Age of the New York Knicks

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Harvey Araton talks about When the Garden Was Eden, the definitive account of how the New York Knickerbockers won their first and only championships, and in the process provided the nation escape from the Vietnam War, the tragedy at Kent State, and the last vestiges of Jim Crow. Araton not only traces the history of New York’s beloved franchise—from Ned Irish to Spike Lee to Carmelo Anthony—but profiles the lives and careers of one of sports’ all-time great teams, the Old Knicks.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jeff Sharlet on Faith in America

Monday, November 14, 2011

Jeff Sharlet explores the borderlands of belief and skepticism, and in Sweet Heaven When I Die: Faith, Faithless, and the Country in Between, he profiles religious radicals, realists, and escapists—from Dr. Cornel West to legendary banjo player Dock Boggs, from the youth evangelist Ron Luce to America's largest "Mind, Body, Spirit Expo." He offers a spiritual landscape.

Comments [8]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Jonathan Lethem on The Ecstasy of Influence

Tuesday, November 08, 2011

Jonathan Lethem talks about the relationship between the novel and contemporary culture. In The Ecstasy of Influence, a collection of new and previously published essays, he looks at the role of the writer as public intellectual, tackling topics from sex in cinema to drugs, graffiti, Bob Dylan, cyberculture, 9/11, book touring, and Marlon Brando, as well as his literary models.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Civilization: The West and the Rest

Monday, November 07, 2011

All over the world, more and more people work for Western-style companies, study at Western-style universities, vote for Western-style governments, take Western medicines, wear Western clothes, and even work Western hours. Historian Niall Ferguson looks at Western civilization’s rise to global predominance in Civilization: The West and the Rest, he argues that, beginning in the fifteenth century, the West developed six concepts that the rest lacked: competition, science, the rule of law, consumerism, modern medicine, and the work ethic.

Comments [12]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Michael Pollan's Illustrated Food Rules

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

Michael Pollan talks about the latest edition of his book Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual, this one includes illustrations by Maira Kalman. It’s a guide for eaters, which presents rules for eating wisely, many drawn from a variety of ethnic or cultural traditions. He discusses local food, organic food, the cost of food, the benefits of cooking at home, and how he came up with the food rules he recommends.

Comments [40]

The Leonard Lopate Show

James Wolcott on the 1970s in New York

Monday, October 31, 2011

James Wolcott describes moving to New York, with the dream of being a writer, in fall 1972—when the city was sinking into squalor at the same time the cultural and creative energy was building. His memoir Lucking Out: My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty in Seventies New York is a portrait of a critic as a young man, and is also a portrait of a legendary time in New York history.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Steve Inskeep on Life and Death in Karachi

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Steve Inskeep, co-host of NPR’s Morning Edition, discusses how migration of the past few decades has transformed Karachi, Pakistan, the largest city whose stability is a vital security concern of the United States. Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi looks at the perils and possibilities of rapidly growing metropolises all around the world.

Comments [12]