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The Takeaway

"Rescue?" "Bailout?" Speaking metaphorically about financial problems

Wednesday, October 01, 2008

Usually figurative language serves to inform and make difficult concepts easier to understand. However, describing the intricacies of the financial crisis and subsequent proposals has proved challenging for many politicians.

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The Takeaway

Evangelical voters: What politicians are doing, with language, to court them

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Republicans have long been successful at courting evangelical voters. Lisa Sharon Harper, evangelical leader and author, explains how politicians use language to appeal to evangelicals. History, race and language have all played a role in mobilizing one of the most influential voting groups in the country.

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The Takeaway

Politicizing the pulpit: Two pastors disagree on separation of church and state

Friday, September 26, 2008

This Sunday, pastors across the country will stand before God and break the law. The crime? Delivering a sermon that either endorses or opposes a political candidate by name. Churches and other non-profit groups have tax exemptions that come with a price: They are not allowed to have any involvement in political campaigns. The Takeaway hears from two pastors with opposing views on politicizing the pulpit: Pastor Gus Booth, who will make an endorsement this Sunday, and Pastor Eric Williams, who will honor the separation of church and state.

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The Takeaway

Patchwork Nation: Economic jitters, Emptying Nests and Service Worker Centers

Friday, September 26, 2008

In our ongoing look at the economy, we turn to our friend Dante Chinni of the Christian Science Monitor's Patchwork Nation project. The project uses demographic information to look at America beyond blue-and-red state dichotomies. What does financial pain feel like on a local level? Chinni talks with The Takeaway about what he's found in two communities on the frontlines of economic downturn, "Emptying Nests” and "Service Worker Centers."

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The Takeaway

Deep in the Amazon, evangelical missionaries fight a custom of killing babies

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

In the Amazon, some native tribes are burying their babies alive if they are born with birth defects — defects that can often be treated with modern medicine. Evangelical Christian missionaries have launched a campaign against the practice, and Brazilian politicians are getting caught in the middle. ABC Correspondent Dan Harris has been deep in the Amazon investigating the debate.

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The Takeaway

The food of Rosh Hashana, re-imagined

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Year in and year out families gather to commemorate holidays and special events with iconic foods: at the Lunar New Year, dumplings; at Thanksgiving, turkey; and Rosh Hashana brings brisket. Celebratory foods connect us to our culture. Can we re-imagine these foods for modern palates without upsetting family members and vital cultural traditions? The answer is yes, and deliciously. Out with the brisket and in with the osso buco when Melissa Clark re-imagines the food of Rosh Hashana.

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The Takeaway

In 1957, nine students exercised their right to education in Little Rock, Ark.

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

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The Takeaway

In the 2008 election cycle, where are the black preachers?

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

We're in the full swing of the 2008 election cycle. But, in a groundbreaking year for race in politics, Patrik Henry Bass has noticed one influential group that's been quiet: black preachers. Traditionally, the black church has played a pivotal role in general elections. But with Barack Obama as the Democratic nominee, is the black vote locked up? Or, is there a small percentage of black conservative churchgoers who could pull a November surprise in favor of McCain?

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The Takeaway

Freakonomics: Who chooses to serve in the American military?

Tuesday, September 23, 2008

About two and a half million men and women serve in the U.S. military. These days, it's a job that almost certainly involves serving in a war zone, as American soldiers continue to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan. So who chooses to serve in the volunteer military? In many cases, it's not people without other options. [Editor's note (9/23/2008): The number of men and women serving in the military was corrected.]

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The Takeaway

Could the end of Wall Street as we know it be the start of a new progressive era?

Monday, September 22, 2008

Guest: John Podesta, Chief of Staff to President Bill Clinton (October 1998 to January 2001). He's now the president and CEO of the Center for American Progress, a progressive think tank. His book "The Power of Progress: How America's Progressives Can (Once Again) Save Our Economy, Our Climate, and Our ...

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The Takeaway

Sen. Margaret Chase Smith aimed for the White House decades before Sarah Palin

Friday, September 19, 2008

Forty-four years ago, Maine Republican Senator Margaret Chase Smith was the first woman nominated by either of the major parties for president. A lot has changed since 1964 (the year vice-presidential hopeful Sarah Palin was born), but some things haven't changed at all.

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The Takeaway

Women matter in this election, but what happens after November?

Friday, September 19, 2008

With the embrace of Sarah Palin, rising popularity of Katie Couric, and the success of Rachel Maddow, all things female are en vogue. But, this seems to be something that happens every 4 years, only to be forgotten and shelved until the next election.

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The Takeaway

Global map shows prevalence of multiple sclerosis in North America and Europe

Thursday, September 18, 2008

Multiple sclerosis, once considered a disease that affected mainly those in Europe and North America, is actually a global concern. The Atlas of MS, the most comprehensive MS research study ever undertaken, was launched this week. For a look at the latest findings, The Takeaway checks in with the man who spearheaded this three-year endeavor.

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The Takeaway

The long history of federal and corporate bailouts

Wednesday, September 17, 2008

They've made headlines every day this week, but bailouts and financial flameouts are a part of American history. The American colonies were bailed out by the French during the Revolutionary war, and then America bailed out the debt-plagued French king by buying Louisiana from him (so he could pay his war bills). The Takeaway looks at more notable American bailouts.

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The Takeaway

The social trendcasting site Edopter.com tries to forecast the next big thing

Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Every year companies spend billions of dollars on market research trying to determine what makes you tick. Now, a new startup says you don't need a focus group to find out what's in -- all you need is a computer and a good pitch.

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The Takeaway

Remembering 9/11: John Hockenberry

Thursday, September 11, 2008

September 11th, 2001, was the first day of school for John Hockenberry’s twin daughters. He looks back at that day and the lessons he and daughters learned.

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The Takeaway

Out of 9/11, a window of opportunity

Thursday, September 11, 2008

Fekkak Mamdouh was scheduled for work on the 107th floor of the WTC’s North Tower on the day of the September 11, 2001 attacks. A former waiter at Windows on the World restaurant, he lost 73 friends and colleagues when the towers fell. After the dust settled, Mamdouh co-founded an organization to help the newly displaced workers — many of them undocumented immigrants — navigate their way to new jobs in the restaurant industry. This year, that organization has opened branches nationwide, and expanded far beyond its immigrant base.

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The Takeaway

Hurricane Ike hits Haiti and Cuba

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

This hurricane season, Haiti has faced down four devastating storms in less than a month. Relief agencies are struggling to help thousands of flood victims, and hundreds of Haitians have died. Meanwhile, in South Florida, home to the largest Haitian expat community in the U.S., money and food has started pouring in. The Archdiocese of Miami has put out a call for donations, and churches across the region are busy taking them in.

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The Takeaway

Is the Palin phenomenon just Reagan in drag?

Tuesday, September 09, 2008

Is excitement building around Gov. Sarah Palin because she is the GOP’s brightest new face or because she’s a time-tested throwback, the latest incarnation of President Ronald Reagan? Journalist Anne Taylor Fleming, author of many articles on Reagan, thinks she's seen Palin's approach before. Reagan tapped into a nostalgia for a simpler, better time, and he stuck to a simple message, repeating it over and over. Fleming discusses Reagan, Palin and what she calls Palin’s special brand of “Little House on the Prairie” feminism.

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The Takeaway

World markets enthusiastic over Fannie/Freddie takeover

Monday, September 08, 2008

Stock markets around the world continue to react enthusiastically to the news of Washington's takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Banks are doing especially well. Markets in Britain, France and Germany are up at least three percent.

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