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Marking the NAACP's 100th Anniversary

Thursday, February 12, 2009

Today marks the 100-year anniversary of the NAACP. Formed by a multi-racial coalition in 1909, the urgency to form the civil rights group was sparked in 1908, during a deadly race riot in Springfield, Illinois. Nearly a century later Barack Obama launched his campaign not far from where the riot lynchings took place. Now that Obama has become our first African-American president it doesn’t mean that the work of the NAACP is done. For a look at the challenges that the NAACP faces in moving it’s mission into its second century, we turn to our contributor Patrik Henry Bass. He is the Senior Editor of Essence magazine, and author of Like A Mighty Stream: The March on Washington, August 28, 1963.

"I remember the passion of the foot soldiers there and I think that passion is still there, we just have to get it to the youth."
— Patrik Henry Bass, senior editor of Essence Magazine, recalling his impression of the NAACP during his youth in North Carolina

Here is Barack Obama's speech at the 99th Anniversary of the NAACP:

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The Takeaway

Only in America? The U.S. health system and the California octuplets

Monday, February 09, 2009

All eyes were on a California woman who gave birth to octuplets earlier this year. The birth of eight children was a modern medical miracle orchestrated by an enormous team of doctors and nurses, and it is a procedure that would not have been possible in many other countries. To explain why our health care system makes successful multiple births more likely we are joined by Dr. Samantha Butts, an OB/Gyn at the University of Pennsylvania Health System and assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania.

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The Takeaway

As one stimulus package is debated, the legacy of another is demolished

Monday, February 09, 2009

President Obama is pushing Congress to finalize his stimulus bill —a plan that would provide federal dollars for projects across the country. At the same time, hundreds of buildings commissioned by another U.S. President in the middle of an economic crisis are being torn down. Buildings commissioned by Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Works Progress Administration are being demolished. Tracie Rozhon, freelance reporter for The New York Times joins us for a look at a group that has started a new national movement to save the buildings that lay at the center of the New Deal.

For more information on the fate of WPA buildings, read Tracie Rozhon's article, New Deal Architecture Faces Bulldozer in today's New York Times.

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The Takeaway

Going off the grid in the push to broadband

Monday, February 09, 2009

They’re calling it the modern day equivalent of the electrical grid, or the interstate highway system. Seven billion dollars of the stimulus plan making its way through Congress right now is devoted to bringing broadband internet to under-served parts of the country. But technology experts worry that the multi-billion dollar tech plan will suffer if we don’t have more time to look at exactly what technology we’re getting. One of these experts is The Takeaway's technology contributor Siva Vaidhyanathan, a professor at the University of Virginia, who joins us now to talk about these concerns.

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The Takeaway

Immigration and the recession: Why immigrants stay when jobs go

Friday, February 06, 2009

The history of the United States is filled with stories of immigrants, many illegal, who have come to the U.S. in search of work. So when the U.S. economy enters a recession and unemployment rises, do these same workers head home? According to Demetrios Papademetriou, President of the Migration Policy Institute, the answer is no. He has recently published a report that says illegal immigrants are likely to stay put in the current economic crisis. He joins us now to explain his findings.

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The Takeaway

Neuroeconomics: This is your financial system on drugs

Friday, February 06, 2009

Neuroscientist Dr. Gregory Berns has likened America’s financial system to a drug addict. If the drug is money, and if the financial sector is in withdrawal, what would the stimulus package mean for Wall Street? We turn to Dr. Berns for his prognosis. Dr. Berns is the Director of the Center for Neuropolicy at Emory University and the author of Iconoclast: A Neuroscientist Reveals How to Think Differently.

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The Takeaway

Population growth throws energy conservation a curveball

Friday, February 06, 2009

Okay, okay, we heard you. You, our listeners, smartly pointed out that with all the energy efficient appliances in the world (and thousands of pounds of algae) future energy consumption will continue increasing because population is increasing. The Power Trip was shaking it's head — how could we forget to talk about this? Today, we'd like you to meet David Biello, an associate editor at Scientific American online who joins The Takeaway to talk to about population, energy, and why when one goes up, it's still possible for the other to come down. (Come on, you're as surprised as we are.)

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The Takeaway

The Green Googleplex

Thursday, February 05, 2009

Just how power hungry is internet giant Google? The Takeaway's Power Trip heads to the Google campuses in Mountain View, California to find out. John Hockenberry sits down with Bill Weihl, the company's green energy czar (that's his title, no joke). On the interview agenda: the company's top picks for which alt-energy sources will rule the future clean energy economy, including solar with a twist. Plus, Weihl talks about the need for government energy subsidies, and why the company still ain't talking about the power consumed by a Google search

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The Takeaway

Ten years after the death of Amadou Diallo, questions still persist

Wednesday, February 04, 2009

Ten years ago today, four New York City police officers shot at Amadou Diallo 41 times, hitting him with 19 bullets. Diallo, a 22-year old immigrant from West Africa was unarmed. The officers, all charged with second-degree murder, were eventually acquitted. One of the many unanswered questions surrounding the Diallo shooting is: If Amadou Diallo were an unarmed white man would he have been shot at? That’s a question that Joshua Correll has been trying to answer since 2002. Correll is an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Chicago. His primary line of research uses videogame simulation of police encounters to examine racial bias in shoot/don't-shoot decisions. He joins us to discuss his results.

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The Takeaway

New family in the neighborhood: The Obamas and Washington, D.C.

Wednesday, February 04, 2009

The election of Barack Obama brought, for the first time, a black family to the White House. But more than that: there’s a new black family in the neighborhood. Long a haven of ambition, achievement, community and art, Washington D.C.’s black community hasn’t always had an easy relationship with the White House. To take a look at how the new residents at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue might interact with D.C.’s black community we are joined by Patrik Henry Bass, Books Editor at Essence Magazine and author of Like a Mighty Stream: The March on Washington, August 28, 1963.

The photographer Patrik Henry Bass mentioned? Addison Scurlock. And the National Museum of American History has an impressive online archive of his work.

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The Takeaway

The decider: How your brain makes up its mind

Monday, February 02, 2009

It seems like there are two kinds of people: the ones who agonize over every decision and the ones who go with their gut. There’s the guy on line at the coffee house who takes ten minutes to decide on a latte and there’s the pilot who makes a split second decision to land a plane in the Hudson River. Neuroscientist Jonah Lehrer is the author of the new book, How We Decide, which explores what goes on in the brain when we make a decision.

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The Takeaway

Luxury items in an economic downturn: The fate of the $10,000 aquarium

Thursday, January 29, 2009

We’ve all heard about how the recession is hitting everyone and everything from automakers to coffee houses. But what about the manufacturers of luxury items? The gold-plated toilets. The private jets. The luxury aquariums. As we take a look at luxury in the downturn, we are joined by K.C. Carter. He’s the financier behind Acrylic Tank Manufacturing in Las Vegas.

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The Takeaway

The Next Y2K? Switching from analog to digital TV

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Last night, the Senate voted to delay the nationwide transition from analog to digital television, opting to push it back from February 17th until June 12th. But reporter Tekla Perry says timing is not the issue: technology is. Perry, a senior editor at the trade publication "IEEE Spectrum," explains that it'll take millions of Americans more than a delay, a government coupon, and $40 box to give their TV a digital upgrade. She joins the show to offer advice on how to make the transition without missing Sweeps week.

For more, read IEEE Spectrum's blog posts Will A Delayed Analog TV Shutdown Fix the Transition? Not Likely and CES 2009: Analog TV Shutdown: Get on with it already!

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The Takeaway

The menu for the Year of the Ox

Monday, January 26, 2009

Today marks the beginning of the Chinese New Year and according to the lunar calendar it’s the Year of the Ox. In Chinese astrology, the ox represents perseverance, patience, balance and hard work. What foods pair well with the symbolism of The Ox and what is the traditional fare to ring in the Chinese New Year? To help answer those questions and to give us a real taste of the holiday is Eddie Chan, catering manager of the Sweet N Tart restaurant in Queens, New York.

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The Takeaway

The Obama effect

Monday, January 26, 2009

Surprising new research suggests President Barack Obama has had a profoundly positive effect on African-Americans who view him as a role model. Why is this surprising? Because it is increasing their scores on tests. The Takeaway talks to Ray Friedman, a management professor at Vanderbilt University, who has tried to measure the effects of role models like Obama on African-Americans.

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The Takeaway

Si se puede! Is it an Obama moment for Latino politicians?

Monday, January 26, 2009

Over 10 million Hispanic voters turned out on Election Day and they overwhelmingly cast their support for President Obama, who received twice as many votes from the Hispanic community than John McCain. Now that Obama is in the Oval Office it’s time for Latinos to cash in and push their agenda. The question is: are they organized enough to maximize the power that they’ve earned? Joining us for a look at how Latinos need to leverage their political influence is Gebe Martinez. She’s a longtime Washington watchdog and a Politico contributor.

Read Gebe Martinez's article, Latinos fight for political recognition at Politico.com

"There clearly is a need for Hispanics to flex that muscle. The question is whether they will and can this year."
— Politico's Gebe Martinez on whether Latino support of President Barack Obama can translate into pro-Latino policy

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The Takeaway

The rise and fall (and rise) of Catholic schools

Friday, January 23, 2009

Across the country, Catholic schools are failing as enrollment plunges. But in rare places, Catholic school enrollment is actually on the rise. Why are so many schools failing, while a few suceed? To answer that question The Takeaway talks to Brenda Becker, a writer from Brooklyn whose daughter has spent nine years in Catholic schools and Bob Voboril, the Superintendent of Schools for the Diocese of Wichita, Kansas.

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The Takeaway

The evolution of the Oscars

Friday, January 23, 2009

Not long ago, the biggest entertainment on Oscar night was watching big budget studio movies duke it out for awards with indie underdogs. But this year’s Oscar nominations suggest that dynamic may be changing. We’re joined by David Carr, The Carpetbagger blogger for the New York Times for his take on the Oscar nominees.

We've compiled the trailers for all the Best Picture nominees. Click away!
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Milk
The Reader
Frost/Nixon
Slumdog Millionaire

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The Takeaway

The morning after: Live from Washington, D.C.

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

The conclusion of the presidential Inauguration marks the end of what may have been the biggest party in U.S. history. Tens of thousands of people head back home today and the real work in the Capitol begins. The Takeaway checks in with two reporters who covered the inauguration. Josh Rogers is a political reporter for New Hampshire Public Radio and Ben Calhoun is a political reporter for Chicago Public Radio.

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The Takeaway

Cross-country inauguration biker arrives in Washington, D.C.

Monday, January 19, 2009

It’s said that a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. For Ryan Bowen, it began with a single thought: I’m too broke to fly from Los Angeles to D.C. for the inauguration of President-elect Barack Obama. Undeterred, Bowen decided to bike across the country. And he’s made it. The Takeaway is joined by writer and cycling activist Ryan Bowen.

Follow Ryan's journey on his video blog:

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