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American Icons: Uncle Tom's Cabin

Friday, October 25, 2013

Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin to promote the abolitionist cause. So how did Uncle Tom become the byword for a race traitor — a “shuffling, kowtowing, sniveling coward”? A scholar traces Tom’s unfortunate journey through pop culture, and a controversial writer who’s been called an Uncle Tom decides to own it ...

Slideshow: Uncle Tom in popular culture

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The Takeaway

Caribbean Nations Sue Europe for Slavery Reparations

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Fourteen Caribbean nations are asking the former colonial powers of Britain, France and the Netherlands to pay for the damage they inflicted through years of slavery and racism. Joining to weigh in on this issue is Staceyann Chin, a Jamaican-American writer and activist who lived in Jamaica until she was 24-years-old. Martyn Day is a senior partner at Leigh Day, the British law firm litigating on behalf of Caribbean countries. He joins the program to explain the legal aspects of the case.

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The Takeaway

The True Story of the Man Behind '12 Years A Slave'

Friday, October 18, 2013

Thanks to the new movie “12 Years a Slave,” many people around the world are learning for the first time about a man named Solomon Northup. A free-born African American man, Northup was kidnapped in 1841, trafficked to the south, and forced into slavery—eventually regaining his freedom in 1853. Renee Moore, founder of the annual Solomon Northup Day in Saratoga Springs, joins The Takeaway to shed light on the real Solomon Northup.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Race, Slavery, and America’s Universities

Monday, September 30, 2013

A 2006 report commissioned by Brown University revealed its complex and contested involvement in slavery, setting off a nationwide controversy. But Brown’s troubling past was far from unique. Many of America’s revered colleges and universities—from Harvard, Yale, and Princeton to Rutgers, Williams College, and UNC—had been dependent on slavery and were breeding grounds for the racist ideas. Craig Steven Wilder reveals the history of oppression behind the institutions often considered the cradle of liberal politics and his new book Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation on Long Island

Monday, August 12, 2013

Mac Griswold talks about Long Island’s Sylvester Manor and the family that has lived there since its founding as a slave plantation centuries ago. Alongside a team of archaeologists, Griswold began a dig that would uncover a landscape bursting with stories. The Manor: Three Centuries at a Slave Plantation describes how the house proved to be a hidden vault full of revelations and treasures, including the 1666 charter for the land, and correspondence from Thomas Jefferson.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Confidence, Crisis, and Compromise in America: 1848-1877

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

Brenda Wineapple looks at one of the most dramatic and momentous chapters in America's past, when the country dreamed of expansion and new freedom, and was bitterly divided over its great moral wrong: slavery. Ecstatic Nation: Confidence, Crisis, and Compromise, 1848-1877 includes extraordinary characters, such as P. T. Barnum, Walt Whitman, Frederick Douglass, and L.C Q. Lamar, and brilliantly balances cultural and political history.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Caribbean Family History

Friday, February 01, 2013

Andrea Stuart, British journalist and author of  Sugar in the Blood: A Family's Story of Slavery and Empire (Knopf, 2013), talks about her family's history of slavery in Barbados.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Abolitionists

Friday, January 04, 2013

Rob Rapley, the writer, director, and producer of "The Abolitionists," a three-part documentary about the group of men and women who pushed for the emancipation of slaves before and during the Civil War. And we'll be joined by Neal Huff, who portrays William Lloyd Garrison. It premieres on PBS's American Experience on Tuesday, January 8.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Context and a Movie: "Django Unchained"

Friday, January 04, 2013

Quentin Tarantino's "Django Unchained" has sparked conversation and controversy over its use of violence, portayal of slavery, and more. Tricia Rose, professor of Africana Studies at Brown University and author of The Hip Hop Wars: What We Talk About When We Talk About Hip Hop-And Why It Matters, discusses the film with Dana Stevens, Slate's film critic and co-host of Slate's Culture Gabfest, now airing on WNYC. Plus: how "Lincoln" and "Django" treat slavery differently.

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The Takeaway

Slaves Freed 150 Years Ago Today

Tuesday, January 01, 2013

It's been 150 years since the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. Historian and novelist A.J. Verdelle talks about what this meant for the millions who were freed. 

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Features

Samuel L. Jackson Talks ‘Django Unchained’

Thursday, December 13, 2012

In Quentin Tarantino’s newest film, “Django Unchained,” Samuel L. Jackson plays a character who represents a more ambiguous characteristic of slavery: a loyal slave.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Slavery's Legacy

Monday, October 08, 2012

Sharon Leslie Morgan, multicultural marketing consultant, genealogist and co-author of  Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade, and Thomas Norman DeWolf, author of Inheriting the Trade and co-author of Gather at the Table: The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade, discuss the legacy of slavery and their work to chart the course of reconciliation.

EVENT: Book reading and signing at the Quaker Meeting House in New York on October 20th.

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The Takeaway

Juneteenth: The Other Independence Day

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Ever since 1776, America has acknowledged July Fourth as our day of independence. But there’s another independence day — today, June 19 — that’s acknowledged by many others as our true day of freedom. Why? Because it was on this date in 1865 that slavery in the United States ended.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Did Slaves Catch Your Seafood Dinner?

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Thailand is one of the largest exporters of seafood to the United States. On today’s Underreported segment, Global Post’s senior southeast Asian correspondent Patrick Winn investigates claims that forced labor is used on Thai fishing boats.

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The Takeaway

Nicholas Kristof on Fighting Child Sex Trafficking

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Last week we talked with a woman who championed a law that requires sites like Backpage.com to obtain documentation proving that the escorts they advertise are at least 18. But in addition to these laws, what else should be done to protect children from the world of sex trafficking? Nicholas Kristof, columnist for our partner The New York Times, has delved extensively into this question.

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The Takeaway

The Slavery on Our Dinner Plates

Friday, February 24, 2012

While most Americans believe their connection to slavery ended with the emancipation proclamation, the unfortunate reality is that it exists to this day — and the evidence is on everyone's dinner plates. A new investigative report reveals that laborers on fishing ships are frequently forced to work up to 52 hours straight under dangerous conditions, and are paid only $260 a month for unlimited hours. Because many companies won't disclose where they get their seafood from, avoiding purchasing slave-fished products is difficult to impossible for consumers.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Slave in the White House

Thursday, February 02, 2012

Elizabeth Dowling Taylor tells the story of Paul Jennings, who was born into slavery on the plantation of James and Dolley Madison in Virginia, and later became part of the Madison household staff at the White House. Her book A Slave in the White House is based on correspondence, legal documents, and journal entries rarely seen before, and reveals attitudes toward slavery of the 19th century.

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On Being

Tiya Miles — Toward Living Memory [remix]

Thursday, February 02, 2012

For Black History Month: a MacArthur "genius" who's unearthing an especially painful chapter of the American experience — the intersecting history of African-Americans and Native Americans, and the little-known narratives that Cherokee landowners held bla

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On Being

[Unedited] Tiya Miles with Krista Tippett

Thursday, February 02, 2012

For Black History Month: a MacArthur "genius" who's unearthing an especially painful chapter of the American experience — the intersecting history of African-Americans and Native Americans, and the little-known narratives that Cherokee landowners held bla

Comment

The Takeaway

The Battle Over History Curriculum in Schools

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Two conversations this week on the sensitivity of certain subjects in the classroom produced lots of reaction from listeners. A ban on ethnic studies in Tuscon Arizona, and a resistance to teaching Climate Change as an accepted body of knowledge in certain school districts around the country raises a broader question. Are there pieces of history and science that are simply too hot to handle in a classroom where active debate may get away from the truth and consensus on what to teach may be hard to find?

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