Streams

 

Slavery

BackStory

Richmond Is a Hard Road to Travel

Friday, April 24, 2015

With the American History Guys

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BackStory

Listener Calls

Friday, April 17, 2015

With the American History Guys

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WNYC News

City to Acknowledge It Operated a Slave Market for More Than 50 Years

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

WNYC
Wall Street's new historical marker will explain that in the 1700s, New York had an official location for buying, selling and renting human beings.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Was Abe Lincoln Racist?

Sunday, April 12, 2015

Harvard University historian John Stauffer talks with Steve Paulson about whether or not Lincoln was a racist.

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To the Best of Our Knowledge

Daring to Offend

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Talking about race is fraught these days, so it took guts for Paul Beatty to write his novel "The Sellout." It's a satire about a young black man who winds up on trial at the Supreme Court. And along the way, he enslaves an old friend and re-segregates the local high school.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Slavery in the North after the American Revolution

Monday, March 16, 2015

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner discusses slavery in the Northern states, which lived on legally and commercially despite being abolished after the American Revolution. 

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WNYC News

A Provoking Play That Doesn't Pull Punches

Friday, February 27, 2015

Branden Jacobs-Jenkins' "An Octoroon," based on a slavery-era work, shocks and delights at Soho Rep.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Measuring Worth with Drops of Blood in 'An Octoroon'

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Judge Peyton is dead, and his plantation is in financial ruins. Peyton’s handsome nephew George arrives as heir apparent, and quickly falls in love with Zoe, a beautiful “octoroon.”

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The Leonard Lopate Show

One of America's Most Influential, and Unknown, Musicians

Monday, February 23, 2015

Lead Belly has inspired generations of musicians: The Weavers, The Grateful Dead, Van Morrison, even Nirvana. Few people know his story, or even when they are listening to his music. 

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BackStory

In Their Own Words

Friday, January 16, 2015

With the American History Guys

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The Takeaway

Is Ferguson as Much About White Rage as Black?

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

The rioting in Ferguson, Missouri and across the country needs to be viewed in the context of American history, says Emory Professor Carol Anderson.

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BackStory

Muslims on the Mic

Friday, October 24, 2014

With the American History Guys

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The Takeaway

Lincoln's Gamble on The Battle to End Slavery

Friday, September 19, 2014

On July 12, 1862, Abraham Lincoln spoke for the first time about freeing the slaves. It would be six more turbulent months until the 16th president decided to take action.

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Studio 360

James McBride and The Good Lord Bird

Friday, August 29, 2014

The jazz musician and author of The Good Lord Bird says he wanted to write a book about slavery and John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry that people would actually enjoy reading.

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The Takeaway

On Juneteenth, How Reparations for Slavery Could Actually Work

Thursday, June 19, 2014

For many African Americans, Juneteenth has become the most celebrated day in American history. It is both a celebration of our victories, and a reminder of how much more there still is to do in the fight for racial equality. 

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WNYC News

The Hidden Racial History of 'My Old Kentucky Home'

Friday, May 02, 2014

WNYC

Often sung as an anthem of the Old South, composer Stephen Foster meant the song to be anti-slavery.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Greg Grandin on The Empire of Necessity

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Greg Grandin tells the story of a remarkable slave rebellion that occurred in 1805. Off a remote island in the South Pacific, Captain Amasa Delano, a New England seal hunter, climbed aboard a distressed Spanish ship carrying scores of West Africans he thought were slaves. They weren’t. Having earlier seized control of the vessel and slaughtered most of the crew, they were staging an elaborate ruse, acting as if they were humble servants. The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World explores this extraordinary event, which inspired Herman Melville’s masterpiece Benito Cereno.


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The Leonard Lopate Show

Escaping from Child Slavery

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Shyima Hall tells about being sold into slavery by her was desperately poor parents when she was 8 years old in Egypt. She moved to Cairo to live with a wealthy family and serve them 18 hours a day, seven days a week. When her captors moved to Orange County, California, they smuggled Shyima with them. She discusses how she was discovered and freed.  Her memoir Hidden Girl reveals how she overcame her harrowing circumstances how she helps others to rescue others in bondage.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Blythe Danner and Sarah Jessica Parker on Stage; Animating Interviews; Escaping Slavery; Richard Powers' Novel; Special Ops

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Blythe Danner and Sarah Jessica Parker talk about starring in Amanda Peet’s play, “The Commons of Pensacola.” Blank on Blank founder David Gerlach on animating archival interviews with everyone from Kurt Cobain to Barry White. We’ll talk to a young woman from Egypt about being sold into slavery in Egypt at the age of 8, and how she was rescued. Richard Power discusses his latest novel, Orfeo. Linda Robinson explains how the American military has turned to its Special Operations Forces more and more over the years.

WNYC News

The Unknown Heroes of Brooklyn's Past

Saturday, January 18, 2014

A new exhibition highlights the borough's abolitionists at a time when one-third of Brooklyn residents were enslaved Africans.

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