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Shakespeare

The Takeaway

Revamping Shakespeare

Friday, December 21, 2012

It’s not hard to see why web cartoonist Ryan North’s new choose-your-own adventure version of Shakespeare’s "Hamlet" has quickly gained popularity among the digital set. But what do Shakespeare scholars make of re-purposing the bard’s work this way? Anya Saffir, theater director and instructor at the Atlantic Acting School, assesses the project.

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New Sounds

"Full Fathom Five": The Tempest in Music

Monday, November 12, 2012

It’s the latest literary edition of New Sounds, featuring music inspired by Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” and just one hour to fit in as much as we can.   There are many references to music in the play (and surely, many a term paper written to that end…) and this “Full Fathom Five,” one of Ariel’s songs, describes a death by shipwreck.  It’s also the title of one of the songs on the album, "Tempest" by the group The Young Scamels (the late Jason Noble and members of Rachel’s.)

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

The Extemporaneous Sir Alec Guinness: Shorter Than You Thought, and to the Point

Monday, October 08, 2012

WNYC

"The Actor and Clichés In the Theater," is the subject Sir Alec Guinness chooses for this impromptu 1964 performance before the Overseas Press Club. 

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The Takeaway

British Archaeologists May Have Found a Lost King

Monday, September 17, 2012

Last week British archaeologists announced they’d found what appeared to be the remains of Richard III. The bones were discovered in a parking lot in the city of Leicester just more than a dozen miles from Bosworth Field, where Richard III became the last English king to die in battle.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Mobile Shakespeare Unit's "Richard III"

Friday, August 10, 2012

Barry Edelstein, director of the Shakespeare Initiative for the Public Theater, talks about the Mobile Shakespeare Unit, which presents Shakespeare for free to prisons, homeless shelters, centers for the elderly, and other community venues throughout the five boroughs to audiences with limited or no access to the arts. It’s wrapping up a three-week tour of "Richard III," which made more than 15 stops across New York City and surrounding areas, including an army base in Brooklyn, Rikers Island prison, and a homeless shelter for adults with mental illness in Manhattan. “Richard III” will run at The Public Theater through Saturday, August 25.

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Around Broadway

A Madman's Macbeth

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

New York Times theater critic Charles Isherwood considers an unusual version of Macbeth starring Scottish actor Alan Cumming.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Bebe Neuwirth on “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”

Thursday, May 10, 2012

Two-time Tony Award winner Bebe Neuwirth discusses her roles as Hippolyta and Titania in the Classic Stage Company’s new production of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” She’ll also talk about her new album, “Porcelain.”

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The Takeaway

Iraq's Sunnis and Shiites Set to a Shakespearean Love Story

Thursday, May 03, 2012

Take one of the greatest love stories of all time and replace the Montagues with Sunnis, the Capulets with Shiites, and set the play in Iraq. That’s the premise for the new play “Romeo and Juliet in Baghdad” showing this week at the World Shakespeare Festival in the United Kingdom. Listen to playwright and actor Monadhil Daood.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Simon Callow on "Being Shakespeare"

Monday, April 09, 2012

Actor, author, and director Simon Callow discusses his role in the new play “Being Shakespeare.” Written and researched by preeminent Shakespeare scholar Jonathan Bate, Shakespeare’s prose is layered with British history and culture, providing a comprehensive picture of how Shakespeare’s childhood, schooling, and life during the Elizabethan period would have inspired his characters. Callow is the author if 16 books and has starred in the films "Amadeus," "A Room with a View," "Shakespeare in Love," "Four Weddings and a Funeral," among others. “Being Shakespeare” is playing at BAM April 4-14.

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Soundcheck

Taming of the Shrew: In Studio

Tuesday, April 03, 2012

Shakespeare in the Wild West? Apparently the Bard was quite popular in hotels, riverboats and mining camps, so a new production of his comedy "The Taming Of The Shrew" is set on the western frontier, and features music drawn from 19th century songs and from Italian opera. Director Arin Arbus, composer/arranger Michael Friedman and the cast join us to perform live.

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Soundcheck

Thomas Hampson: The Met's Macbeth

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Five years ago, the LA Times named Thomas Hampson’s title role performance in Verdi’s Macbeth at the San Francisco Opera one of the “Best of 2007.” This week, the baritone brings his portrayal of the Shakespeare character to the Met for the first time. He joins us in the studio to talk about this role - and his other recent projects.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Haydn Gwynne on Her Role in "Richard III"

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Haydn Gwynne talks about her role as Queen Elizabeth in the Bridge Project’s production of "Richard III" at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, directed by Sam Mendes and featuring Kevin Spacey in the title role.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ralph Fiennes on “Coriolanus”

Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Ralph Fiennes talks about directing and starring in the new film “Coriolanus,” based on the play by William Shakespeare. It tells the story of a Roman General who is at odds with the city of Rome and his fellow citizens. His controlling mother Volumnia (played by Vanessa Redgrave) pushes him to seek the position of Consul, but the public refuses to support him. Coriolanus’s anger prompts a riot, and he is expelled from Rome. He then allies himself with his sworn enemy Tullus Aufidius (played by Gerard Butler) to take his revenge on the city.

 

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Radiolab

Why are bad guys bad?

Monday, January 09, 2012

When we talk about badness and human nature, we keep smacking into a persistent problem: how do you explain cruelty? James Shapiro, professor of English at Columbia University, zeroes in on the drama of this question with a maddening insight from Shakespeare, by way of the villainous Iago.

And that ...

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Radiolab

The Bad Show

Monday, January 09, 2012

We wrestle with the dark side of human nature, and ask whether it's something we can ever really understand, or fully escape.

Comments [142]

New Sounds

"Full Fathom Five": The Tempest in Music

Monday, November 14, 2011

It’s the latest literary edition of New Sounds, featuring music inspired by Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” and just one hour to fit in as much as we can.   There are many references to music in the play (and surely, many a term paper written to that end…) and this “Full Fathom Five,” one of Ariel’s songs, describes a death by shipwreck.  It’s also the title of one of the songs on the album, "Tempest" by the group The Young Scamels (Jason Noble and members of Rachel’s.)

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

King Lear at the Public Theater

Friday, November 11, 2011

Sam Waterston, who plays King Lear; Kelli O’Hara, who plays Regan; and Michael McKean, who plays Gloucester, discuss the production of Shakespeare’s “King Lear” at the Public Theater. It’s playing through November 20.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Cymbeline

Friday, October 28, 2011

Noah Brody and Ben Steinfeld talk about co-directing and also starring in the Fiasco Theater Company’s production of “Cymbeline.” The Shakespeare drama tells the story of a beautiful princess separated from her beloved, the cruel step-mother who tries to kill her, a husband duped by an adversary, an exiled nobleman who kidnaps a king's sons, and a Roman invasion of Britain. “Cymbeline” is playing at the Barrow Street Theatre.

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Studio 360

Shakespeare by Anonymous

Friday, October 21, 2011

The movie Anonymous directed by Roland Emmerich opens this week. Except for the heavy use of computer-generated images, it's nothing like his previous disasteramas — The Day After Tomorrow, Independence Day, and 2012. But that's not why Anonymous is controversial: the ads show the silhouette of an Elizabethan man holding a quill pen ...

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Top 5 @ 105

Top Five New Nonfiction Books About Classical Music

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

Maestros, masterpieces, a minimalist and a modern instrument aren’t just highlights of the new classical music season — they’re subjects of a crop of new books about classical music.

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