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Shakespeare

WNYC News

You Too, Brutus, a Woman?

Friday, October 04, 2013

Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar is a violent cautionary tale about the abuse of power. Moliere’s The Learned Ladies is a genial satire about social and intellectual pretension. As WNYC’s Sarah Montague reports, each is being interpreted this season in an unusual way: with all women casts.

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Operavore

Shakespeare, the Musical Muse

Friday, August 16, 2013

Shakespeare’s plays, with their gorgeous language, are not always congenial for musical adaptation. And yet, the stories and characters are so vivid and, yes, human, writes Fred Plotkin.

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Around Broadway

Less Shakespeare and More Musical in the Park

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

The second offering at Shakespeare in the Park this summer is a musical adaptation of Love’s Labour’s Lost, the Bard's early comedy. New York Times theater critic Charles Isherwood weighs in.

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Soundcheck

Michael Friedman Sets Shakespeare To Song In 'Love's Labour's Lost'

Thursday, August 01, 2013

The Public Theater's Shakespeare in the Park is one of New York City’s most beloved summer traditions. But this year, something rather unusual is playing at the festival – a Shakespeare-based musical. Brought to you by the duo behind "Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson," "Love's Labour's Lost" is a hilarious mash-up of original 16th century text and a modern-day college town setting.

Composer and lyricist Michael Friedman wrote the songs for the new production, and he joins us to talk about why he and director Alex Timbers were drawn to this particular play of Shakespeare's. 

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Soundcheck

Chuck Klosterman Wears The Black Hat; Franz Ferdinand Plays Live; 'Love's Labour's Lost' Set To Song

Thursday, August 01, 2013

In this episode: Music has played a pivotal role in the work of Chuck Klosterman, who wrote about hair metal in his first book, Fargo Rock City. Today, he joins us to talk about villains, as dissected in his new book, I Wear the Black Hat.

Plus: Franz Ferdinand, the Scottish-bred art-pop band that staked its claim with the 2004 single “Take Me Out,” has returned with a new album called Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action. The band plays live in our studio. 

And: Michael Friedman composed the music for the Public Theater’s new Shakespeare In The Park musical presentation of the classic comedy "Love's Labour's Lost." He joins us to talk about setting Shakespeare to song. 

Radiolab

If You Prick Us...

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Shakespeare was really into blood. It saturated his work and literally soaked the floorboards in many of his productions. James Shapiro explains what blood meant to The Bard, in a time when the world was just on the cusp of understanding how the powerful, perplexing liquid ...

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Radiolab

Blood

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

The metaphor, magic, and money coursing through our veins...

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The Takeaway

How To Swear Like Shakespeare

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Does swearing betray a lack of education and class on the part of its speaker? Anya Saffir doesn’t think so. A Shakespeare director and faculty of the Atlantic Acting School, she says there’s no shortage of class, creativity, and wit in well-used profanity. And we need look no further than the Bard himself for proof of that.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hamlet and the Modern World

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

The figure of Hamlet reverberates in our culture. Psychoanalyst Jamieson Webster and professor of philosophy Simon Critchley, show how the power of Hamlet casts light on the intractable dilemmas of human existence. In Stay, Illusion: The Hamlet Doctrine, the authors show how Hamlet discloses the modern paradox of our lives: how thought and action seem to pull against each other, the one annulling the possibility of the other.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Martha Plimpton Guest Hosts the Leonard Lopate Show: Wallace Shawn and More

Tuesday, July 09, 2013

Guest host Martha Plimpton speaks with Constance Rosenblum, who writes the “Habitats” column for the New York Times, about how New Yorkers really live. Dave Malloy, who created “Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812,” director Rachel Chavkin, and Blake DeLong discuss their unusual production. Andre Gregory and Wallace Shawn talk about their collaboration on “The Designated Mourner.” Plus Simon Critchely and Jamieson Webster look at one of the most famous works in Western literature: Shakespeare’s “Hamlet.”

The Leonard Lopate Show

“Shakespeare: The King’s Man”

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

James Shapiro talks about his documentary “Shakespeare: The King’s Man,” and reveals little known details about Shakespeare’s life and work.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Guest Picks: James Shapiro

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently to talk about his documentary, "Shakespeare: The King's Man." He also told us what he's been reading recently -- aside from the Bard's plays.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Wrangling for Immigration Reform; Tap Dancer Savion Glover; Excesses on Wall St.; Unknown Shakespeare

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Guest host Jonathan Capehart fills in for Leonard. First, Lanae Erickson Hatalsky talks about today's Supreme Court rulings on gay marriage. New Yorker staff writer Ryan Lizza looks at the congressional wrangling over immigration legislation. Savion Glover discusses  his new show at the Joyce called “Stepz.” Former Galleon Group trader Turney Duff describes what Wall Street people do after hours. And scholar James Shapiro shares some little known facts about Shakespeare and his work!

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Around Broadway

Shakespeare in the Park Kicks Off with Kid-Friendly Comedy

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Delacorte Theater unwraps itself for Shakespeare in the Park. The Public Theater presents two free Shakespeare works this season: The Comedy of Errors and later in the season, Love’s Labors Lost.

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Slate Culture Gabfest

The Culture Gabfest: The Selfie Duckface Edition

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Slate's culture critics Stephen Metcalf and June Thomas are joined by Nina Rastogi to discuss "Game of Thrones" (warning: spoilers), Joss Whedon's adaptation of "Much Ado About Nothing", and the phenomenon of the "Selfie." Show notes at...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Alan Cumming in "Macbeth"

Thursday, May 16, 2013

The actor talks to Leonard Lopate about this production of the Bard's famous tragedy, in which he is the lone patient, reliving the infamous story and inhabiting each role himself.

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Operavore

At Columbia University, Great Books to Great Opera

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Opera fans are lurking among the student body at Columbia University, writes Fred Plotkin. "Opera companies would be wise to cultivate Columbia students for future audiences."

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Radiolab

The Love Secretary Always Writes Back

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Lulu Miller's advice for taking the edge off that unrequited love this Valentine's? Send a letter to Verona, Italy, where an office of 20 volunteers replies to thousands of notes about love and heartbreak every year.

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Slate Culture Gabfest

The Culture Gabfest: First Time, Long Time Edition

Tuesday, December 25, 2012

Slate critics Stephen Metcalf, Dana Stevens and Julia Turner respond to questions from listeners on a wide range of topics, including the Psy hit "Gangnam Style," what defines a great acting performance, and their favorite high school coming-of-age movies

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The Takeaway

A New Version of Hamlet: You Pick the Ending

Friday, December 21, 2012

What if Shakespeare's "Hamlet" could end any way you please? In a new book that's become the most successful Kickstarter publishing campaign ever, it can. Web cartoonist Ryan North discusses his new comic creation, "To Be or Not to Be: That is the Adventure."

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