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Shael Polakow Suransky

Schoolbook

City Teacher Data Reports Are Released

Friday, February 24, 2012

UPDATED | After a long legal battle and amid much anguish by teachers and other educators, the city Department of Education released individual performance rankings of 18,000 New York City public school teachers to the public on Friday. The rankings are now available on SchoolBook, listed by school.

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Schoolbook

Do High-Needs Students Affect a School's Grade?

Monday, February 13, 2012

New York City's latest plan to reform special education services encourages public school principals to take more of the neediest students. An analysis by WNYC shows how these students are not distributed evenly across all schools. The analysis also found that high schools with the best report card grades often take smaller percentages of the special education students who are the toughest to educate.

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Schoolbook

The School-Closing Vote

Thursday, February 09, 2012

UPDATED | The Panel for Educational Policy voted Thursday night to close 18 city schools and remove the middle school grades from 5 more. SchoolBook was there, providing updates throughout the evening.

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Schoolbook

Mayoral Hopefuls Protest School Closings

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

A week before the city's Panel for Educational Policy is scheduled to vote on plans to shrink or phase-out 25 more struggling schools, four potential mayoral contenders joined opponents of the mayor's school reform policies at a news event on the steps of City Hall.

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Schoolbook

Where Was the Help?, Wadleigh Supporters Ask Education Official

Thursday, January 26, 2012

A crowd of about 200 community leaders, elected officials and NAACP members turned out Thursday night to oppose the city's plan to phase out the middle grades of Wadleigh Secondary School for the Performing and Visual Arts in Harlem. They had tough questions -- and tough words -- for Deputy Chancellor Shael Polakow-Suransky.

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Schoolbook

City Says It Will Focus on College Readiness

Thursday, January 19, 2012

In a joint hearing of the higher education and K-12 education committees, City Council members asked Department of Education officials how it was possible to assign meaning to an increasing graduation rate if a majority of students remain unprepared for college.

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Schoolbook

Poor Students Improving in Math and Reading, Report Card Shows

Thursday, December 08, 2011

Buried in the reading and math results released in the report of the National Assessment of Educational Progress was a glimmer of good news for New York City: Poor students did less poorly in math and reading than they did in 2003, and the achievement gap for blacks also appeared to shrink slightly in the city.

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WNYC News

Scores Stagnate in NYC on National Tests

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

New York City's public school students showed no significant gains on national exams in math and reading this year, despite showing gains in previous years.

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Schoolbook

Officials Pledge Help for Queens High School

Friday, November 18, 2011

Help is on the way to Queens Metropolitan High School, where a scheduling problem has inconvenienced students. The problem was discussed at a quiet meeting of the Panel for Educational Policy. Also: a list of upcoming school events, including a Community Networking Fair at Francis Lewis High School in Queens.

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Schoolbook

Inclusion: The Right Thing for All Students

Friday, November 11, 2011

In an open letter to the New York City schools' chief academic officer, Shael Polakow-Suransky, a disabilities expert argues that integrating special education students into the general classroom is a proven method that improves the education both of children with disabilities and those without.

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Schoolbook

For Some Special Ed Students, Inclusion Is Deferred

Thursday, November 10, 2011

More than 85 percent of New York City’s special education students are not meeting state standards for reading in the elementary and middle grades. Yet the city spends about $5 billion a year to educate students with special needs, more than a fifth of the total budget for schools. The city has been heavily criticized for spending so much money and getting such poor results. It is now trying to improve the way these students are educated. But going forward sometimes means taking a step back.

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Schoolbook

College Readiness by the Numbers, at Last

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

If there is good news to be found in the city's latest progress reports for high schools, and its first public analysis of college readiness of students, it is this: At last the city has school-by-school data to judge how the high schools are preparing their graduates for college-level work.

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Schoolbook

City's Chief Operating Officer for Schools Leaving

Wednesday, October 05, 2011

More than a year after being named chief operating officer of the city's schools, Sharon L. Greenberger is stepping down to become the a senior vice president at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Chancellor Dennis M. Walcott announced today.

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Schoolbook

To Track or Not to Track: The Question Resurfaces

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

A new study raises fresh questions about a familiar issue: Are we giving top students short shrift? Yes, it is the old debate over tracking, and in light of the study's finding that top students "struggle to maintain their elite performance over the years," Room for Debate asks six experts their opinions. Surprisingly, given the ferocity and length of the educational battle, most of them favor some differentiated learning, but with caveats and twists.

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Schoolbook

More Schools Are Struggling, City Progress Reports Show

Friday, September 23, 2011

The number of elementary and middle schools receiving D's and F's under New York City's grading system more than doubled this year from last after Department of Education officials did away with a safety net that prevented some schools from falling too far.

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Schoolbook

Students Return to a Leaner School System

Thursday, September 08, 2011

Teachers, principals, and students return to schools today, where the order to do more with less may be born out in larger class sizes, fewer supplies and disappearing after school programs.

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Schoolbook

Who's Who at Tweed: A Guide to the Chancellor's Cabinet

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

Former school teachers and principals, political aides and the spokeswoman for two Congressional leaders are among the people in Chancellor Dennis M. Walcott's cabinet.

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WNYC News

Panel Votes to Close 10 Schools Following Raucous Hearing

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

A panel controlled by mayoral appointees voted to close 10 low-performing schools Tuesday night following a raucous public hearing that pushed beyond midnight. What should happen to struggling schools? Take our poll.

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WNYC News

Opponents of Cathie Black Consider Legal Action

Monday, November 29, 2010

Mayor Bloomberg's decision to accept a compromise proposed by State Education Commissioner David Steiner means publishing executive Cathie Black is expected to receive the waiver she needs to become schools chancellor Monday. Black lacks the right education credentials for the job but Bloomberg has argued that her management experience make her exceptionally qualified for the position. But will the plan fly with school parents and activists?

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