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Segregation

The Leonard Lopate Show

The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time

Monday, March 11, 2013

Ira Katznelson examines the pivotal New Deal era through a sweeping international lens that shows democracy struggling against enticing ideologies like Fascism and Communism. Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time argues that a small group of Southern lawmakers protected American democracy during the 1930s and 1940s, even as they safeguarded racial segregation. 

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The Takeaway

The Changing Face of the South

Monday, March 04, 2013

In her new book, "The New Mind of the South," author Tracy Thompson explains how she felt compelled to return to her Southern upbringing to piece back together the history she learned through a prism of segregation in the post-Jim Crow era South.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

James L. Farmer Jr. Advocates Revolutionary Freedoms for African-Americans

Friday, September 21, 2012

"America is being forced to face itself," James Farmer proclaims in this 1963 Overseas Press Club appearance, before discussing the upcoming march on Washington and the historical roots of the civil rights struggle.

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The Takeaway

No Child Left Behind Conflicts with Desegregation Policy in Louisiana

Friday, August 03, 2012

Like many schools since No Child Left Behind was enacted, Rayville Elementary School is required to allow its students to transfer to a better school in the district because it has received a failing grade, but not if those students are white.

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The Takeaway

Diverse Neighborhood, Uniform Friends

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Tanner Colby is what you might call a typical, liberal, city-dwelling, 30-something white guy. But one day he looked around and realized something: Despite living in Brooklyn, one of the most diverse cities in the world, he had no black friends.

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Schoolbook

Snow Days in June? Check Your Local Listings

Monday, May 21, 2012

Note to public school parents: Adjust your calendars. Though the rains keep coming this spring, the winter was a mild one, and in many schools, two snow days that were never used are being given back to students at the end of June. But there's a catch: after having those two days off, students must come back to school for a half-day of classes, for one final counting of attendance.

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Schoolbook

Readers Ask: At Segregated Brooklyn School, Is It Race or Class?

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Hundreds of readers responded to a New York Times article on Sunday about a charter school in Brooklyn that is representative of the many de facto segregated public schools in New York City. They raised issues of class, condemned a climate that is hostile to achievement and questioned whether more black teachers at the school would resolve the problems.

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The Takeaway

The Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia

Thursday, April 26, 2012

In Jim Crow America, African Americans were relegated to the status of second class citizens. Through laws and social norms, racism was legitimized and the practice operated as a way of life. Now, there is a museum remembering the era: the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia. Our Detroit reporter from WDET, Martina Guzman, spoke with the museum's curator Renee Romano about how his past informed his vision of the museum.

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The Takeaway

Jackie Robinson's Legacy

Monday, April 16, 2012

For today's sports fans, it’s hard to imagine professional teams segregated by color. That changed 65 years ago when Jack Roosevelt Robinson, the son of Georgia sharecroppers, joined the Brooklyn Dodgers to become the first African-American in major league baseball. American sports have come a long way since 1947, but maybe not far enough. This season, just over eight percent of professional baseball players are black. That's less than half of what it was in 1959, when the last team was integrated. Are we living up to or failing Jackie Robinson's legacy? Author of "Opening Day: The Story of Jackie Robinson’s First Season", Jonathan Eig, explains.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Diversity and Segregation in New York City

Monday, March 19, 2012

Richard Alba, distinguished professor of sociology at CUNY and acting director of the Center for Urban Research discusses a new study on segregation in New York City and what it means to our understanding of diversity. Alba is the author of The Next Generation: Immigrant Youth in a Comparative Perspective, edited with Mary Waters, and Blurring the Color Line: The New Chance for a More Integrated America. And Jenifer Bratter, associate professor of sociology and the director of Race Scholars at Rice University, explains why Houston was recently declared the most diverse city but also a still segregated city.

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The Takeaway

New Study Shows Growing Rate and Acceptance of Interracial Marriage

Friday, February 17, 2012

In 1958, Mildred and Richard Loving were arrested in their own home, in the middle of the night, for the crime of miscegenation. When the Supreme Court declared miscegenation laws illegal in 1967, 16 states still had such laws on the books. A new poll released this week by the Pew Research Center shows just how far we’ve come in the five decades since the Lovings’ arrest. 15 percent of new marriages in 2010 crossed racial or ethnic lines, double the rate from 1980. And a great majority of Americans say they would readily accept an interracial marriage in their family.

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It's A Free Blog

On MLK Weekend, Remembering the Quiet Soldiers

Friday, January 13, 2012

We owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to the team of lawyers who fought in Brown and the cases that followed. One of those attorneys, Robert L. Carter, passed away just last week.

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Schoolbook

For Some Special Ed Students, Inclusion Is Deferred

Thursday, November 10, 2011

More than 85 percent of New York City’s special education students are not meeting state standards for reading in the elementary and middle grades. Yet the city spends about $5 billion a year to educate students with special needs, more than a fifth of the total budget for schools. The city has been heavily criticized for spending so much money and getting such poor results. It is now trying to improve the way these students are educated. But going forward sometimes means taking a step back.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Plessy and Ferguson

Tuesday, June 07, 2011

Artist Keith Plessy, President of the Plessy & Ferguson Foundation, and Phoebe Ferguson, photographer, documentary filmmaker, and co-founder of the Foundation, discuss their friendship and the idea of "separate but equal" in today's society. Plessy is a descendant of Homer Plessy, and Ferguson is the great-granddaughter of Judge John Ferguson, author of the decision upholding segregation that was affirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1896 in Plessy v. Ferguson.

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The Takeaway

Civil War Anniversary: Celebration of Confederacy or Segregation Reminder?

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. For whites in the south, the anniversary marks the start of a proud military engagement. For blacks in the south, the war led to the end of slavery and the start of the civil rights movement. And while celebrations for the event will be grand in scale and scope, this year's commemoration will not reverberate nationally as it did during the centennial. How do the two anniversaries compare? 

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