Streams

 

 

Science And Technology

The Leonard Lopate Show

What's Causing One of the Driest, Warmest Winters in History

Friday, February 03, 2012

Mark Fischetti, senior editor at Scientific American, explains why this winter has been unusually warm and dry across most of North America.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: How to Save the World—Climate Change and How to Stop It

Friday, February 03, 2012

This week’s Please Explain, the third in our series How to Save the World, is about climate change and how to stop it. David Archer, professor of geophysical sciences at the University of Chicago, and author of The Long Thaw: How Humans are Changing the Next 100,000 Years of the Earth’s Climate, and Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast; and Klaus Lackner, Director of the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy at Columbia University’s Earth Institute join us to talk about carbon in the atmosphere, how and why it is causing climate change, and how to slow or stop climate change by using sustainable energy and carbon sequestration.

Comments [18]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Design in Nature

Thursday, February 02, 2012

Adrian Bejan takes the recurring patterns in nature—trees, tributaries, air passages, neural networks, and lightning bolts—and reveals how a the Constructal Law accounts for the evolution of these and all other designs in our world. Design in Nature: How the Constructal Law Governs Evolution in Biology, Physics, and Social Organization, written with J. Peder Zane, looks at how everything—from biological life to inanimate systems—generates shape and structure and evolves in a sequence of ever-improving designs in order to facilitate flow.

Comments [22]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mercury, Songbirds, and Bats

Monday, January 30, 2012

David C. Evers, executive director of the Biodiversity Research Institute, discusses how mercury in the environment is harming songbirds and bats, which suffer some of the same kinds of neurological disorders that mercury causes in humans. The Biodiversity Research Institute has issued a report, titled “Hidden Risk: Mercury in Terrestrial Ecosystems of the Northeast.”

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: How to Save the World—Population Growth and Control

Friday, January 27, 2012

This week's Please Explains is the second in our series on how to save the world—ways to approach complex global problems such as climate change, food supply, garbage disposal, the global water supply, and violence. Today we're looking at the population explosion—there are now 7 billion people on the planet. We're joined by Hania Zlotnik, director of the population Division at the Department of Economics and Social Affairs at the United Nations, and Dr.Joel E. Cohen, mathematical biologist and the head of the Laboratory of Populations at Rockefeller University and Columbia University, and author of How Many People Can the Earth Support?

Comments [21]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Underreported: Controversial Livestock Hormone

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Helena Bottemiller, a reporter for The Food & Environment Reporting Network, looks at the controversial animal feed additive, ractopamine hydrochloride, which is widely used in the united states but the EU and China have banned it’s use, citing health concerns.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Plagiarism in Scholarly and Medical Journals

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Harold Garner, Executive Director and Professor at the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute at Virginia Tech, and Melissa Anderson, Professor of Higher Education at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, talk about scholarly and medical journal articles being retracted with increasing frequency because of software that can detect plagiarism and bad data. They’ll discuss the problems of plagiarism and peer reviewing and what happens when people are accused of it.

Comments [15]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Update on White Nose Syndrome

Thursday, January 19, 2012

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife service recently announced that White Nose Syndrome has killed more than 5.7 million bats in North America. Mylea Bayless, of Bat Conservation International, gives us an update on what’s happening to bat populations and efforts to save them.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

"Man on a Mission"

Friday, January 13, 2012

Michael Woolf, director of the documentary “Man on a Mission: Richard Garriott’s Road to the Stars,” and the film’s subject, Richard Garriott, discuss Garriott’s lifelong quest to become the first son of an astronaut to blast into space. When eye problems made a career at NASA impossible, he turned to private space travel to launch into space. “Man on a Mission” opens at Cinema Village January 13.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Tuberculosis

Friday, January 13, 2012

Tuberculosis remains one of the world’s deadliest diseases—accounting for 9.4 million cases and 1.7 million deaths in 2009, according to the WHO. Maryn McKenna, science journalist and author of Superbug, and Dr. Neil Schluger, Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Environmental Health Sciences at Columbia University Medical Center and Chief Scientific Officer for the World Lung Foundation, give us a history of the disease, how it spreads, why it’s so hard to treat, and how drug-resistant TB has emerged and what it means for the future of treating the deadly disease.

Comments [27]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Placebos and Clinical Trials

Monday, January 09, 2012

Beryl Lieff Benderly discusses the potential dangers of relying on double-blind clinical trials, which she sees as damaging the chances for patients in dire need of getting treatments. She also talks about why she thinks too many researchers are looking at what placebos aren't doing, as opposed to what they are. Her latest article, "Head Games," is in the current issue of Miller-McCune.

Comments [16]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Cyberthieves, Cybercops and You

Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Misha Glenny explores the three fundamental threats facing us in the 21st century: cybercrime, cyberwarfare, and cyberindustrial espionage. Darkmarket: Cyberthieves, Cybercops and You explores the rise and fall of the criminal website DarkMarket and looks at the new, ever-changing, often invisible, breed of criminal: the hacker.

Comment

The Takeaway

Citing Bioterrorism Fears, US Asks Journals to Censor Bird Flu Study

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

In an unprecedented move, the United States government has asked two scientific journals to redact details of biomedical experiments which it fears could be used by terrorists to create deadly viruses. Two labs in the U.S. and the Netherlands recently created easily transmittable versions of the A(H5N1) virus, which causes bird flu. Though bird flu is highly lethal, it is not easily contracted by humans. Scientists have long been concerned an easily transferable version of the virus could create one of the deadliest pandemics in history. 

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Polyester and Synthetics

Friday, December 16, 2011

Earlier this year we looked at the natural fibers wool and silk, and this week we’re talking about polyester and other synthetics! Polyester is used in carpeting, building materials, and clothing. Sean Cormier, assistant professor in the Textile Design and Marketing Department at the Fashion Institute of Technology, and Jill Dumain, Director of Environmental Strategy at Patagonia, explain how polyester and other synthetics are made and how they’re used.

Comments [21]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Food Additives

Friday, December 09, 2011

Food labels often list ingredients like carrageenan, modified food starch, and butylated hydroxytoluene. On this week’s Please Explain we’ll find out what they are, what they do, and why they’re in packaged foods. Michael Jacobson, microbiologist at the Center for Science in the Public Interest a nonprofit health advocacy group that focuses on nutrition and food safety policies, and Marion Nestle, professor in the Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health and Professor of Sociology at New York University, explain. Michael Jacobson is the author of Six Arguments for a Greener Diet. Marion Nestle is the author, most recently, of Safe Food: The Politics of Food Safety, Updated and Expanded and Pet Food Politics: The Chihuahua in the Coal Mine.

Comments [33]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Why Has America Stopped Inventing?

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

Darin Gibby attempts to answer the question Why has America stopped inventing? by taking a close look at patent law. Statistics show that today we invent less than half of what our counterparts did a century and a half ago. In Why Has America Stopped Inventing? He compares some of America’s most successful 19th-century inventors with those of today.

Comments [17]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Future of Space Exploration

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

Curator Michael Shara talks about the future of space exploration now that the space shuttle program has been ended, and discusses the exhibition “Beyond Planet Earth: The Future of Space Exploration,” at the American Museum of Natural History through August 12, 2012.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Teenagers' Brains

Friday, December 02, 2011

In October, neuroscientists Sandra Aamodt and Sam Wang were on Please Explain to discuss how a young children’s brains develop. And this week they return to discuss the brains of adolescents and teenagers—from sleep problems, gender differences, behavior issues, learning disabilities, and hormones. They investigate myths about brain development and sort through the factors that matter—and those that don’t—in brain development from childhood to college. They’re the co-authors of Welcome to Your Child's Brain: How the Mind Grows from Conception to College.

How well do you know your child's brain? Take this quiz!

Comments [15]

The Leonard Lopate Show

How Copernicus Revolutionized the Cosmos

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Dava Sobel tells how the 16th-century discoveries of Nicolaus Copernicus changed the world. More Perfect Heaven: How Copernicus Revolutionized the Cosmos tells how a young German mathematician had Copernicus's manuscript On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres published, in 1543 and explains how the book forever changed humankind's place in the universe.

Comments [4]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Nathan Myhrvold discusses his massive six-volume, 2,400-page set of books outlining science-inspired techniques for preparing food. Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking, written with Chris Young and Maxime Bilet and a 20-person team at The Cooking Lab, outlines how to use tools such as water baths, homogenizers, centrifuges, and ingredients such as hydrocolloids, emulsifiers, and enzymes. It is a collection and a project that attempts to reinvent cooking.

Comments [7]