Streams

 

 

Science And Technology

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: The Science of Cooking

Friday, May 03, 2013

For Please Explain, Curious Cook Harold McGee talks about the science of cooking—from how heat changes meat to the differences between baking powder and baking soda. He’s the author of a number of books, including Keys to Good Cooking, and On Food and Cooking.

Comments [10]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Mars Rover

Thursday, May 02, 2013

New Yorker staff writer Burkhard Bilger and Adam Steltzner, the leader of the Mars Rover's entry, descent, and landing team, talk about the Mars Rover, NASA, and federal finding. Bilger wrote the article “The Martian Chroniclers” in the April 22, 2013, issue of The New Yorker.

Comments [5]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Temple Grandin on The Autistic Brain

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Temple Grandin talks about the latest autism science. When she was born in 1947, autism had only just been named. Today, one in 88 children diagnosed on the spectrum, and autism studies have moved from the realm of psychology to neurology and genetics, and there is far more hope today than ever before thanks to groundbreaking new research into causes and treatments. Her book The Autistic Brain, brings her singular perspective to an exploration of innovative theories of what causes autism and how we can diagnose and best treat it.

Comments [13]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Chemical Testing and Regulation

Monday, April 22, 2013

Ian Urbina, New York Times investigative reporter, and Monona Rossol, chemist, industrial safety expert and author of Pick Your Poison, talk about the lack of testing of chemicals found in shampoos, cosmetics, cleaners, and other household goods. They’ll explain how the FDA regulates these chemicals, concerns about their safety, and how states are creating their own programs to police chemical safety.

Comments [18]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Mapping the Brain

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Dr. Eric Kandel, Director of the Kavli Institute for Brain Science and co-director of the Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia University Medical Center, discusses the federal brain mapping project that President Obama announced this month, aimed at understanding problems like  epilepsy, autism, and Alzheimer's disease. He’ll explain the challenges of brain research and discuss whether this project will advance brain science.

Comments [12]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Foreclosure Settlement, John Lurie, Nathaniel Rich's Novel, Sequencing the Human Genome

Monday, April 15, 2013

ProPublica’s Paul Kiel explains how the government plans to compensate the 3.9 million homeowners who were victims of aggressive foreclosure policies. John Lurie discusses his career in television, film, art, and, of course, music. Nathaniel Rich talks about his new novel, Odds Against Tomorrow. And yesterday marked the tenth anniversary of the first complete mapping of the human genome, and we’ll talk to bioethicist Robert Klitzman about how the human genome sequence has changed medicine.

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Human Genome Project: Ten Years Later

Monday, April 15, 2013

April 14th marked the tenth anniversary of the first complete mapping of the human genome. Dr. Robert Klitzman, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and the Director of the Masters of Bioethics Program at Columbia University and author of Am I My Genes?, talks about how human genome sequencing has changed medicine and bioethics.

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

Your Best and Worst Memories of Science Class

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

We asked for your memories, good and bad, of science class and got stories about flirty classmates, burning desks, and much more.

Comments [7]

The Takeaway

Study Finds Black and White Alzheimer's Patients Share Gene Variants

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

In one of the largest studies ever done on Alzheimer’s in African-Americans, researchers discovered that the gene variants associated with Alzheimer in people of European ancestry was the same as the one seen in African-American Alzheimer's patients.

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

What's Killing Honeybees?

Thursday, April 04, 2013

Eric Mussen, apiculturist at University of California, Davis, discusses the latest findings on what’s killing honeybees, what the loss of bees means for agriculture, and how beekeepers and researchers are addressing the problem.

Comments [3]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Cyborg Insects and Remote Controlled Rats

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Researchers are beginning to understand how to “hack” the central nervous systems of certain animals in ways that would allow us to control their movements—including a flying beetle which can be remotely steered.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Unwanted Electronic Gear Piles Up

Monday, March 25, 2013

Flat-screen technology has drastically lowered the demand for the recycled tube glass and creating stockpiles of useless materials across the country.

Comments [19]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Electronic Trash, The Bronfman Haggadah, "The Flick" on Stage, and Manhattan's Grid

Monday, March 25, 2013

Flat-screen televisions and monitors are harder to recycle than their older counterparts. On today’s showwe'll find out what’s happening to this new kind of trash. Edgar M. Bronfman and illustrator Jan Aronson talk about their new version of the Haggadah. Annie Baker talks about her latest play, “The Flick,” along with actor Matthew Maher. And, we’ll hear the little-known story of John Randel, Jr., the man who invented Manhattan’s street grid in the 19th century.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Please Explain: Natural and Artificial Flavors

Friday, March 22, 2013

If you look at many packaged food, you’re likely to find the words “natural flavors” and “artificial flavors” on the ingredients list. These terms seem ambiguous, but they explain why much of the foods Americans eat tastes the way it does. For today’s Please Explain, explain Dr. Gary Reineccius, professor and head of the Flavor Research and Education Center in the Department of Food Science and Nutrition at the University of Minnesota, and Barb Stuckey, professional food developer and author of Taste: Surprising Stories and Science about Why Food Tastes Good, explain what natural and artificial flavors are, how they’re made, and why they’re used in everything from cough syrup to candy to French fries to frozen yogurt.

Comments [13]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Life in the Deepest Ocean

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Wall Street Journal reporter Jonathan D. Rockoff talks about recent expeditions that have discovered plentiful microbial life in the deepest, darkest parts of the ocean—some 6.8 miles below sea level.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

Whatever Happened To Stem Cells?

Monday, March 18, 2013

Esquire articles editor Tyler Cabot talks about the history of stem cell research and the long chain of happy mistakes and lucky breaks that have led to many of the grandest discoveries in this area. He’ll be joined by Dr. Anthony Atala, a leader in stem cell research who is trying to raise $1 billion on his own to self-fund research into the breakthrough cures stem cells may bring. Cabot’s article “Whatever happened To Stem Cells?” appears in the April issue of Esquire

Comments [6]

The Takeaway

The Science, Fantasy, and Romance of Time Travel

Friday, March 08, 2013

This weekend, much of the U.S. and the world will be springing ahead one hour, as Daylight Saving's Time begins. Ostensibly, setting our clocks ahead will save us some light. But in a less logical way, it will also allow us to travel ahead in some way -- to time ...

Comments [28]

The Leonard Lopate Show

The Big Data Revolution

Tuesday, March 05, 2013

Viktor Mayer-Schönberger explores the hottest trend in technology—big data—and how it will affect the economy, science, and society at large. “Big data” refers to our burgeoning ability to crunch vast collections of information, analyze it instantly, and draw sometimes profoundly surprising conclusions from it. Big Data: A Revolution that Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think shows how this emerging science can translate myriad phenomena—from the price of airline tickets to the text of millions of books—into searchable form, and uses our increasing computing power to reach epiphanies that we never could have seen before.

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Terror Courts, Rita Moreno, Phone Phreaks, Morality and Technology

Monday, March 04, 2013

The Wall Street Journal’s Supreme Court correspondent Jess Bravin and government prosecutor Lt. Col. Stuart Crouch talk about the courts at Guantanamo Bay, where suspected Al Qaeda terrorists are tried. Rita Moreno looks back at her career on stage and screen. She’s one of the few artists to win Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony Awards. We’ll look at the underground network of “phone phreaks” who managed to hack into the country’s telephone system. Plus, the political and moral dilemmas posed by the technological efficiencies of the digital age.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Phone Phreaks Exploding the Phone

Monday, March 04, 2013

Phil Lapsley describes the clandestine underground of “phone phreaks,” a misfit group of technophiles, blind teenagers, hippies, and outlaws figured out how to hack the world’s largest machine: the telephone system. In Exploding the Phone, he show how they turned the network into their electronic playground and gives an account of the explosion of telephone hacking in the counterculture, and the war between the phreaks, the phone company, and the FBI.

Comments [5]