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Science

These Waves Keep Sharks Away From Swimmers

Sunday, August 10, 2014

Sharks are sensitive to electromagnetic fields, thanks to certain receptors in their snouts. Surfers, divers and others nervous about attacks can strap on field-generating devices for peace of mind.

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All Things Considered

Glass-Free Menagerie: New Zoo Concept Gets Rid Of Enclosures

Saturday, August 09, 2014

An architectural firm is designing a zoo that will forgo cages, working barriers into a natural landscape. "You won't have a lonely tiger walking around inside a cage," says architect Bjarke Ingels.

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All Things Considered

Pump Up The Bass, Feel Like A Boss

Saturday, August 09, 2014

A new study found that listening to music with heavy bass lines — think "We Will Rock You" and "In Da Club" — makes people feel more powerful.

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WATCH: NASA Tests New Mars Braking System

Saturday, August 09, 2014

The saucer-like Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator went up 190,000 feet to simulate the conditions of an orbital entry at the red planet.

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New Mexico's Northern Landscape Gets A New Burst Of Color

Saturday, August 09, 2014

An unusually wet monsoon season has painted the desert, normally dusty brown, a lush green. It has been a welcome respite from the years of devastating drought that have plagued the state.

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On The Media

Our Universal Robots

Friday, August 08, 2014

The word 'robot' first appeared in 1920 in Karel Čapek's play, Rossum's Universal Robots. Since then, intelligent machines have starred countless times in novels and films. Brooke talks with professor Jay P. Telotte about the ways our fears and fascinations with robots are reflected in culture. 

Music: Calexico - Attack El Robot! Attack! Special thanks to @bartona104 (Julia Barton) for the suggestion on Twitter!

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On The Media

Engineering Intelligence

Friday, August 08, 2014

Despite the technological leaps made in the realm of artificial intelligence, people often object to the idea that the minds of machines can ever replicate the minds of humans. But for engineers, the proof is in the processing. Brooke talks with Stanford lecturer and entrepreneur Jerry Kaplan about how the people who make robots view the field of AI. 

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All Things Considered

Lake Erie's Toxic Bloom Has Ohio Farmers On The Defensive

Friday, August 08, 2014

Ohio farmers say they are not the only ones to blame for Toledo's polluted drinking water. They say they are using only as much fertilizer as they need to grow their crops.

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All Things Considered

Lake Erie's Toxin-Fueled Bloom Has Ohio Famers On The Defensive

Friday, August 08, 2014

A recent water crisis cast a light on fertilizers used by farmers in the region of Toledo, Ohio.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How to Contain and Control the Ebola Outbreak

Friday, August 08, 2014

West Africa is in the midst of the largest Ebola outbreak ever recorded. For this week's Please Explain, an infectious disease expert talks about where it comes from, how it spreads, and how it can be contained.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Secret Roots of Our Shark Freak-Outs

Friday, August 08, 2014

It's a summer ritual - everyone freaks out about shark attacks. But, according to WNYC reporter Jim O'Grady, it's a fairly recent phenomenon and one that can be traced to an attack in 1916 in Matawan, NJ. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Crime, Suffering, Tragedy and John Lithgow

Friday, August 08, 2014

New Yorker staff writer Nicholas Schmidle looks into whether the Chicago police coerced witnesses into implicating a man for a murder he didn’t commit. John Lithgow talks about playing King Lear in the Public Theater’s Shakespeare in the Park production. Jo Nesbø talks about his latest crime thriller, The Son. Plus, this week’s Please Explain is all about the ebola virus and other infectious disease outbreaks, and how they’re treated, contained, and brought under control.

The Brian Lehrer Show

Drugs for Ebola?

Friday, August 08, 2014

Anthony Fauci, immunologist and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at The National Institutes of Health, talks about the experimental drug treatment for two Americans with Ebola and the current best practices for stopping the current outbreak.

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On The Media

THIS WEEK ROBOTS! (AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE)

Friday, August 08, 2014

A special theme hour - starring a computer competing against a comedian for laughs, the Army's recruitment chatbot, and Google crushing on robots. 

On The Media

Google's Robot Brigade

Friday, August 08, 2014

Google has scooped up more than a half dozen robot companies, but they are keeping mum about why they're acquiring these technologies.

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Radiolab

Happy Birthday Bobby K

Thursday, August 07, 2014

For Robert’s birthday we celebrate with some classic Krulwich and a peek into the spirit and sensibility that, in many ways, drives our show.
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PRI's The World

How an American scientist helps grandmothers in Argentina find their ‘stolen’ grandchildren

Thursday, August 07, 2014

For three decades, Mary-Claire King has led efforts to improve genetic technologies that can be used to identify the stolen children of Argentina’s Dirty War. Her partnership with The Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo has yielded remarkable results.

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PRI's The World

The Internet goes ape over a monkey selfie and the copyright battle it sparked

Thursday, August 07, 2014

This is no joke: A selfie taken by a crested black macaque has caused a massive copyright battle between Wikipedia and David Slater, who says the popular site is stealing one his most valuable photos.

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All Things Considered

Transformer Paper Turns Itself Into A Robot. Cool!

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Start with paper; add Shrinky Dinks, a microprocessor, heat, and voila! It's not quite that easy. But this engineering project might one day lead to a printable, flat spacecraft that folds itself.

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Science Friday

Algorithm Turns Everyday Objects Into Microphones

Thursday, August 07, 2014

Sound waves trigger tiny vibrations in objects. By studying the vibrations, researchers can recreate the sounds that caused them.

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