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PRI's The World

Meet the new horse-headed, 35-foot-long, beaked Deinocheirus mirificus

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Some scientists are describing the newly discovered dinosaur known as Deinocheirus mirificus as freaking weird. How did a 35-foot long, omnivorous, horse headed, hump-backed, huge armed animal live?

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Why California's Drought-Stressed Fruit May Be Better For You

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Is California's severe drought hurting the nutrient content of fruit? No, preliminary data on pomegranates suggest. The fruit may be smaller, but packed with more antioxidants, tests show.

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Scientists Fight For Superbug Research As U.S. Pauses Funding

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Frustrated scientists argued Wednesday that making nasty viruses even worse in the lab provides crucial insight into preventing pandemics. Others say it just ups the risk a lab germ will start one.

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Morning Edition

Is There Really Such A Thing As A 'Trophy Wife'?

Thursday, October 23, 2014

The idea of a "trophy wife" is common in popular culture: Attractive young women trade beauty for status by "marrying up" and finding wealthy husbands.

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All Things Considered

Bigger Than A T. Rex, With A Duck's Bill, Huge Arms And A Hump

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Scientists first figured the claw-tipped, giant arm bones found in 1965 belonged to an ostrichlike dinosaur. But its recently recovered skull looks more like a dino designed by a committee — of kids.

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All Things Considered

Sunken U-Boats Off North Carolina Coast A Significant Find For Historians

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

The North Carolina coast may be the last place you'd think to find a sunken German submarine from World War II. But that's what Joe Hoyt — a nautical archeologist — found on a recent expedition to the ocean floor. Robert Siegel talks to him about the underwater battle site there.

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PRI's The World

With climate change, Boston's future could be filled with gondolas

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

One picture has people in Boston talking about climate change and rising sea levels. It shows an imagined future of the historic Back Bay neighborhood. And the future looks like Venice.

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Morning Edition

A 45,000-Year-Old Leg Bone Reveals The Oldest Human Genome Yet

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

The DNA in this ancient Siberian leg bone shows that the man had Neanderthal ancestors — yet more proof that humans and Neanderthals interbred. And he lived much farther north than expected.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Two of 'The Brilliant Ten' Scientists

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Computer scientist Roxana Geambasu and bioengineer Jonathan Viventi, listed on Popular Science magazine “The Brilliant 10” list, talk about their groundbreaking work.

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Morning Edition

Banned Drugs Still Turning Up In Weight-Loss Supplements

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Just because the Food and Drug Administration recalls a supplement because it contains dangerous substances doesn't mean the product disappears from the market.

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The Void Is A Busy Place

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Is there such a thing as complete emptiness or nothingness? Not according to modern physics, where empty space gets more active all the time, says commentator Marcelo Gleiser.

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New Tech City

Containing Disease Like They Did in This Video Game

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Governments need to be able to predict how outbreaks spread and grow. But that's not so easy. Here's how one bizarre and totally accidental video game incident made the modeling smarter.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hearts and Minds: Loving NYC, Top Creators and Scientists

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Writers on their unshakable love for New York City. The story of four NYU undergrads who set out to build anew  social network. Two scientists on Popular Science's “Brilliant 10” list.

All Things Considered

Ebola Vaccine Could Start Testing In Africa By January

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

The World Health Organization says two vaccine candidates now undergoing small-scale tests of dosage and safety in people might be ready for broader deployment in Africa by early 2015.

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PRI's The World

The invasive emerald ash borer has killed millions of trees, but researchers hope a wasp can save some of the survivors

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Ash trees across North America have been falling by the million to an invasive beetle from China, the emerald ash borer. Now scientists in New Hampshire and elsewhere are introducing another bug from China in a last-ditch effort to save some ash trees.

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The Takeaway

America's Dark History of Medical Apartheid

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

From Typhoid Mary to the AIDS epidemic to the Ebola crisis: The language of exclusion has a long history in terms of fighting disease in the United States.

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The Takeaway

The True Story Behind the Mars Rover

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

A former NASA chief engineer and co-author of "Mars Rover Curiosity: An Inside Account from Curiosity's Chief Engineer" details the saga leading up to Curiosity's launch.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

DNA, a Play, and Why Fiction Matters

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

How DNA and history shape our identities and our futures. Azar Nafisi on why fiction matters in a democratic society. Matthew Broderick and Micah Stock in “It’s Only A Play.”

The Leonard Lopate Show

How DNA and History Shape Our Identities and Our Futures

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Christine Kenneally explores how everything from DNA to emotions to the stories we tell are all part of our human legacy and help shape our future.

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When Reassuring Isn't: The Rush To Test Cruise Passenger For Ebola

Monday, October 20, 2014

Galveston, Texas, officials meant well when they tested a passenger while she was still at sea. But some say airlifting a blood sample in a Coast Guard helicopter was needlessly alarming.

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