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Science

FDA Proposes End To Lifetime Ban On Gay Blood Donors

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Men who haven't had sex with other men in a year will be allowed to donate blood under a proposed change in FDA policy.

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The New Yorker: Out Loud

The Puzzling Promise of Graphene

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

If you’ve heard about graphene, you’ve probably heard that it’s a miracle substance. The only atom-thick material known to man, it seems to also be the lightest, strongest, and most conductive material on earth. Its potential applications seem almost limitless. The only problem, as John Colapinto explained in a recent magazine piece, is that nobody has figured out what to do with it yet. On this week’s Out Loud, Colapinto joins Nicholas Thompson, the editor of newyorker.com, and Vauhini Vara, a business and technology blogger for the site, to discuss the challenges that hyped new technologies face in the marketplace, and whether graphene is likely to live up to its promise.

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Farm Fresh? Natural? Eggs Not Always What They're Cracked Up To Be

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Egg cartons these days are often plastered with an array of terms that can confuse and even mislead consumers. Here's a glossary of carton jargon for the wannabe informed egg buyer.

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Orangutan Declared To Have Basic Legal Rights In Argentina

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

A Buenos Aires judge ruled in favor of advocates, who are calling for more freedom for Sandra, a 28-year-old orangutan who was born in a zoo.

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Morning Edition

Baby Thrives Once 3-D-Printed Windpipe Helps Him Breathe

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Michigan doctors used 3-D printing to custom-make a splint to prop open Garrett Peterson's defective windpipe last January. He's home with his parents this Christmas, as "normal life" begins.

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Radiolab

How Much Would You Pay For A Year Of Life?

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Two years ago, a group of doctors did something unprecedented - they boycotted a cancer drug because it cost too much, given the benefit.

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Radiolab

How Do You Put a Price Tag On Nature?

Tuesday, December 23, 2014

What happens when humans figure out a cheaper, better way, to do something that nature had been doing for eons? 

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All Things Considered

What Motivates People To Give?

Monday, December 22, 2014

The holiday season is a big time of year for charitable giving. Host Audie Cornish speaks with NPR's Shankar Vedantam about a study that says portion of charitable giving is driven by social pressure.

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PRI's The World

The North Koreans have been honing their hacking skills for years

Monday, December 22, 2014

How did one of the least wired countries in the world become a hub of hacking? North Korea has been investing in their cyber-capability for years.

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Morning Edition

When Humans Quit Hunting And Gathering, Their Bones Got Wimpy

Monday, December 22, 2014

Humans have lighter bones than other primates, and that change happened a lot later than anthropologists had thought. Blame our sedentary ways after our ancestors took up farming.

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In The Deep Ocean, Ghostfish Breaks Records

Sunday, December 21, 2014

NPR's Rachel Martin takes a moment to talk about a new fish discovered in one of the deepest places on Earth.

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Staff Picks: An Evangelical Christian Believer In Climate Change

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Weekend Edition staff have been picking their favorite interviews from 2014. Editor Natalie Winston talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about an interview with an evangelical Christian climate scientist.

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In Wineries Vs. Weather, Drones To The Rescue?

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Rising temperatures have hastened harvest dates in Sonoma County — and they're changing grape-growing patterns around the world. Vineyards are responding with everything from sunscreen to sensors.

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All Things Considered

Want To Enhance The Flavor Of Your Food? Put On The Right Music

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered a link between what you taste and what you hear.

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A Snail So Hardcore It's Named After A Punk Rocker

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Inspired by the snails' spiky shells and acid-loving nature, researchers named the new species Alviniconcha strummeri, after Clash frontman Joe Strummer.

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3-D Scanning Sonar Brings Light To Deep Ocean Shipwrecks

Saturday, December 20, 2014

In San Francisco Bay, researchers are using new technology to investigate shipwrecks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with James Delgado, director of Maritime Heritage at NOAA, about what they've found.

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New EPA Standards Label Toxic Coal Ash Non-Hazardous

Friday, December 19, 2014

Environmental groups had sought to have coal ash, a byproduct of coal-fired power plants, regulated as hazardous waste.

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At Last, I Meet My Microbes

Friday, December 19, 2014

At 31, a woman had the bacteria in her gut catalogued as part of scientific project that aims to characterize the creatures that live inside us and affect our health. Here's what she found out.

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PRI's The World

Now will Cuba get better Internet service?

Friday, December 19, 2014

Cuba feels like the late 1990s when it comes to Internet access. But if Havana is serious about a real upgrade, it's time to think outside the Socialist box.

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How Peppermint Tricks Us Into Feeling (Deliciously) Cold

Friday, December 19, 2014

We have the chemical menthol to thank for the wonderful mouth-feel of peppermint. Scientists now know that menthol fools the brain by activating receptors involved with sensing cold.

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