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The Leonard Lopate Show

Dolphin-Killing Virus

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

A virus has been killing bottlenose dolphins off the East Coast, and it seems to be spreading south toward Florida. Marjorie Mooney-Seus, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries, explains what we know about this disease and how it’s affecting ocean life.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

De Blasio Transition; 60 Minutes Apology; Ken Burns; Babies' Morals

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

As we learn more about what a de Blasio administration will look like, WNYC's Andrea Bernstein discusses the transition. Plus: following up on the 60 Minutes apology over their coverage of the 2012 Benghazi attack; filmmaker Ken Burns on his new film The Address about memorizing the Gettysburg address; and Yale psychology professor Paul Bloom on his new book Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil.

Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage

Monday, November 11, 2013

Scientists say Typhoon Haiyan is one of the strongest ever recorded, though limited measurements may prevent them from declaring it as the record holder. Still, the storm was devastating: "We had a triple whammy of surge, very high winds and strong rainfall," says one climate scientist.

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'Ferrari Of Space' Crashes And Burns In Earth's Atmosphere

Monday, November 11, 2013

More than a ton of advanced electronics crashed into Earth's atmosphere Sunday night, when the European GOCE orbiter ended its four-year mission. When it re-entered the atmosphere over the South Atlantic Ocean, most of the 2,425-pound craft disintegrated; about 25 percent did not.

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Lessons In Leadership: It's Not About You. (It's About Them)

Monday, November 11, 2013

It takes more than a decisive vision to solve intractable world problems, says Harvard leadership expert Ronald Heifetz. Instead, he advises his students — including budding heads-of-state — to think less like surgeons and more like psychiatrists.

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Lighting Up The Investigative Path With Polonium-210

Sunday, November 10, 2013

Conspiracy theories continue over the death of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, and polonium is suspected as the weapon of the alleged assassin. Whatever happened to Arafat, there is a case from 2006 that shows just how destructive the radioactive element can be. It all started with a sip of green tea.

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Billions Of Planets Could Support Life

Sunday, November 10, 2013

A study released this week found there could be as many as 40 billion habitable planets in the galaxy. Host Rachel Martin talks to Mike Brown, a professor of astronomy at the California Institute of Technology, to help digest the enormity of the finding.

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'Ferrari Of Space' Crashing Back To Earth — Maybe Tomorrow

Saturday, November 09, 2013

Sometime Sunday or early Monday, a 2,425-pound satellite that ran out of fuel last month and began falling from its already low orbit will plunge back to Earth. About a quarter of the European Space Agency's satellite is expected to survive re-entry and strike somewhere on the planet.

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Can We Eat Our Way To A Healthier Microbiome? It's Complicated

Friday, November 08, 2013

It may be possible to cultivate a healthier community of bacteria on and inside us by modifying our diet. For starters, eating more vegetables probably won't hurt.

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Which Is It? Hurricane, Typhoon Or Tropical Cyclone?

Friday, November 08, 2013

When it comes to what you call a particular tropical cyclone, it's really a matter of location, location, location.

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Astronomers Find Bizarre 'Lawn Sprinkler' Asteroid

Friday, November 08, 2013

P/2013 P5, with six comet-like jets, was first spotted using the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawaii, and then seen in more detail by the Hubble Space Telescope.

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How Tall Is The Washington Monument? Surveyors Take To The Top

Friday, November 08, 2013

The last time the monument's height was measured was in 1999. And with scaffolding in place for earthquake repairs, engineers have a rare opportunity to take official measurements of the iconic obelisk.

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Navigating Dietary Supplement Regulations

Friday, November 08, 2013

Echinacea, vitamins, and other dietary supplements have become a $5 billion industry, but the products don't need to be pre-approved by the FDA before they go on the market. How do we know what is really in our supplements? What regulations are currently in place? How can we keep ourselves safe and informed?

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The Myth of the Woolly Bear

Friday, November 08, 2013

Legend holds that the length of a woolly bear caterpillar's color bands can be used to forecast how severe the winter weather will be. The myth dates back to colonial American folklore but was popularized by a 1948 study. SciFri finds out if there's any truth to the lore, and what the caterpillar's fuzzy bristles are really used for.

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India and NASA Home In on Mars

Friday, November 08, 2013

This week, India launched Mangalyaan, its first robotic mission to orbit Mars and probe its atmosphere. Only Russia, Europe, and the U.S. have successfully orbited the planet. Joan Johnson-Freese, a professor in national security affairs, and planetary scientist Bruce Jakosky discuss the Indian space program, as well as NASA's upcoming mission to the Martian atmosphere.

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The Takeaway

Super Typhoon Blasts Into Philippines

Friday, November 08, 2013

One of the strongest storms every recorded on the planet, Super Typhoon Haiyan, smashed into the Philippines early Friday morning, bringing winds of 195 mph and gusts of 235 mph—some of the highest speeds ever recorded in human history. Joining The Takeaway to discuss the storm is Aaron Aspi, Emergency Communications Officer for World Vision, a relief and development organization that works in countries around the world, including the Philippines.

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Why Row Across The Oceans?

Friday, November 08, 2013

Roz Savage quit her high-powered London job to become an ocean rower. She's crossed the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans — solo.

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What's It Take To Become A Polar Explorer?

Friday, November 08, 2013

In 2004, Ben Saunders became the youngest person ever to ski solo to the North Pole. Now, he'll set out on another record-breaking expedition, this time to be the first to walk from the coast of Antarctica to the South Pole and back again.

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Are Earth's Deepest Caves The Last Frontier?

Friday, November 08, 2013

Engineer and daredevil caver Bill Stone pushes the frontier — through flooded tunnels, the remotest depths of the Earth and the limits of human endurance.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

What's In a Chicken Nugget?

Friday, November 08, 2013

Dr. Richard deShazo of the University of Mississippi Medical Center, the lead author of the article "The Autopsy of Chicken Nuggets Reads 'Chicken Little'” in the American Journal of Medicine, talks about his investigation into what, exactly, chicken nuggets contain. Surprise: it's not all chicken meat.

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