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Radiolab

The Iceman Speaks

Friday, November 22, 2013

Stefan Merrill Block, a novelist and friend of our show, reads his haunting short story from the perspective of Ötzi the Iceman (the mysterious figure at the center of our latest short, An Ice-Cold Case).

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A Handful of Nuts, a Lifetime of Benefits?

Friday, November 22, 2013

In a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers reported an association between daily nut consumption and a reduction in the risk of dying from cancer, heart disease, and other major chronic diseases. Lead author Charles Fuchs discusses these findings.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Understanding E-Cigarettes

Thursday, November 21, 2013

E-cigarettes—small devices which deliver vaporized nicotine to users—are a $2 billion industry. The three large tobacco companies have also made forays into the market. While regulators study the health impacts and safety of e-cigarettes, the demand for the product continues to grow. E-cigarettes are not subject to New York City bans on smoking in public parks or beaches, and it’s not uncommon to see users “vaping” in restaurants, subways and theaters. Dr. Richard Hurt, director of the Nicotine Dependence Center at the Mayo Clinic, and Dr. Deepak Saxena, assistant professor of basic science and craniofacial biology at the NYU College of Dentistry, talk about how e-cigarettes work and their growing popularity.

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Reinventing The Condom With Easy-On Tabs And Beef Tendon

Thursday, November 21, 2013

What would it take for people to like using condoms? Inventors say it's all about the fit and feel. The 11 winners in a competition sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation include one condom made from beef tendons, and another that's heat-activated for a glove-like fit.

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The Greene Space

On-Demand Video: Tech + Today's Worker - Upgrading Your Skills in Every Phase of Life

Thursday, November 21, 2013

The importance of STEM (science, tech, engineering and math) education in schools has been getting a lot of attention lately. But it's not just kids who need to be savvy in those subjects to survive the global economy.

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The Takeaway

Scientists Bewildered by Strange Sun Activity

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Every 11 years the sun switches it's magnetic poles in the culmination of it's solar cycle. We are quickly approaching this planetary event, but scientists are curious about some unusual behavior this time around. Some of the sun's activity, including the intensity of it's sunspots and the placement of it's magnetic field, are behaving in ways not seen for over a century. The Takeaway is joined by Todd Hoeksema, director of the Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford University, who explains more about this interesting event.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Fastest Evolving Place on Earth

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Scientists recently determined that Páramos, small, high-elevation ecosystems in the Andes, are the fastest evolving places on earth. Science writer Carl Zimmer explains what makes these tiny mountainous enclaves—and their giant daisy trees—so diverse.

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Remember 'French Fries Cause Cancer'? Here's The Acrylamide Update

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Back in 2002, news that acrylamide, a carcinogen in animals, had been found in some foods set off a bit of a panic. Now the FDA has issued a new warning on the chemical in food. But here's the puzzler: In the years since that first scare, the human studies haven't really backed those initial concerns about cancer.

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Radiolab

An Ice-Cold Case

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Scientists' obsession with one particular man - and with the tiny scraps of evidence left in the wake of his death - gives us a surprisingly intimate peek into the life of someone who should've been lost to the ages.

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WNYC News

Cuomo Pushes More Homeowners to Leave Flood Zones

Monday, November 18, 2013

Governor Cuomo expanded a program to de-populate the state's most vulnerable flood zones by offering buyouts to 129 homeowners in Staten Island. 

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The Takeaway

New Cholesterol Calculator Doesn't Add Up | The Challenges of the Legal Marijuana Economy | For Better or Worse, National Parks Enter the Digital Age

Monday, November 18, 2013

New Cholesterol Calculator Doesn't Add Up | The Challenges of the Legal Marijuana Economy | Washington Pot Entrepreneurs on Joining The Retail Market | Remembering Literary Icon Doris Lessing | Retro Report: A Look Back at the Detroit Sleeper Cell Case | Egyptomania: Why An Ancient Culture Holds Our Fascination ...

Soundcheck

With Cochlear Implants, Music Is Harder To Hear Than You Think

Friday, November 15, 2013

Since the 1970's, more than 200,000 people have received cochlear implants, which allow deaf patients to hear speech, and sometimes even talk. But not all auditory signals are created alike: While people with cochlear implants can hear speech, but those patients can't hear music. But now, a team from the University of Washington has developed an algorithm that allows the implants to process some of the building blocks of music, namely pitch and timbre. 

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Bacterial Competition In Lab Shows Evolution Never Stops

Friday, November 15, 2013

Day after day, workers at Michigan State University care for and feed colonies of evolving bacteria. The original microbes have produced more than 50,000 generations in the 25 years since the experiment began. Despite predictions the bacteria might someday reach a point where they would evolve no more, the results show they keep changing.

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Soundcheck

The Story Of Fosse; Princess Music Plays Live; Cochlear Implants

Friday, November 15, 2013

In this episode: In Fosse, a new biography of the legendary dancer and choreographer Bob Fosse, author Sam Wasson reveals the insecure, insanely brilliant man who forever changed the way we dance.

Then, Colorado chamber-pop quintet Princess Music play songs from Odobenidae -- the band's new album named after the marine mammal family that includes the walrus -- in the Soundcheck studio.

And: Since the 1970's, cochlear implants have allowed more than 200,000 deaf people to hear. But it might surprise you to hear that the implants do not allow for hearing music -- at least the way that those with normal hearing do. Dr. Charles Limb explains why, and what some researchers are doing to change that.

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Radiolab

My Wine Won't Stop Crying — A Mystery In A Wineglass

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Something strange happens when you slosh wine in a wineglass. The wine doesn't just settle. Some of it starts to "cry." That is, little droplets of wine slide down and then mysteriously creep up again, dripping, then climbing, dripping, climbing, over and over, pushed by some force that doesn't seem to end. What's going on?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Doris Kearns Goodwin's The Bully Pulpit; History of Paper; "In No Great Hurry"; Ethanol Production

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin talks about the intense relationship between Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, a friendship became a rivalry in the 1912 election. We’ll look at how the invention of paper 2,000 years ago has shaped civilizations ever since. Tomas Leach talks about his documentary, “In No Great Hurry,” about the photographer Saul Leiter. And we’ll examine the ecological and economic costs of ethanol production.

The Leonard Lopate Show

Ethanol, an Environmental Disaster?

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Corn production has surged since 2007, when Congress required oil companies to mix more ethanol into their gasoline to reduce greenhouse gases. Associated Press reporters Matt Apuzzo and Dina Cappiello reveal that there are profound environmental consequences from increased corn production. Some 6.5 million acres of land set aside for conservation—more than Yellowstone, Everglades, and Yosemite National Parks combined—have vanished, while nearly 19 new million acres of corn have been planted.

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Radiolab

The Sludge at the Bottom of the Sea

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Whatever happened to all that poop New York City dumped out in the ocean?

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New Tech City

These Games Could Be Good for Young Brains

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Games have power, so this week, we play a few that can motivate kids to learn more, whether they realize it or not. And we see how a test case of a new technology for football might help keep young heads safer (and smarter) from injury.

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