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Science

Tech Leaders, Economists Split Over Clean Energy's Prospects

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Renewable energy has become a $220 billion a year industry. But to significantly slow climate change, the power of wind, solar and other renewable sources must vastly expand. Some say the tech breakthroughs needed are on the horizon, though a top economist sees a tougher road ahead.

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Radiolab

Science Reporter Emily Graslie Reads Her Mail — And It's Not So Nice

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Reporter Emily Graslie explores natural history museums, showing us what's going on behind the scenes. Her viewers write her, of course, and in this video, she reads some of those letters. They're not about science. Or Museums. They're about Emily. And it's embarrassing.

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Science Reporter Emily Graslie Reads Her Mail — And It's Not So Nice

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Reporter Emily Graslie explores natural history museums, showing us what's going on behind the scenes. Her viewers write her, of course, and in this video, she reads some of those letters. They're not about science. Or Museums. They're about Emily. And it's embarrassing.

Comment

'Forecast Bust:' Why 2013 Hurricane Predictions Were So Wrong

Friday, November 29, 2013

Forecasters expected the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season to be really busy — the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration told Americans to expect between seven and 11 hurricanes. But this year has been one of the quietest on record. Why were the predictions so far off?

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Eating 'Wilder' Foods for a Healthier Diet

Friday, November 29, 2013

In Eating on the Wild Side, author Jo Robinson reveals how the nutrition and flavor has been bred out of supermarket fruits and vegetables. Robinson tells us what we can do to reclaim our wild roots and the nutrition from our foods.

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On The Media

Stats Man

Friday, November 29, 2013

If an NFL announcer sounds like an omniscient know-er of all things football, it's because they've got a stats man in the booth feeding them info. 75-year-old Marty Aronoff is one of the best stats men in the business. Bob talks with Aronoff about stats and his 200 travel days a year getting to games. 

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Brain Cells 'Geotag' Memories To Cache What Happened — And Where

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Scientists have identified special cells in the brain's hippocampus that mimic a trick of some digital cameras. These cells automatically 'tag' the memory of each event in our lives with information about where that event took place — the better to recall, perhaps, where we left our lost keys.

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Radiolab

The Power of Music

Thursday, November 28, 2013

The physical and psychological power of music... from a Disco hit that saves lives, to Beethoven's drive to push listeners to the brink.

 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Toxins in Our Bodies

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Industrial hygienist and chemist Monona Rossol discusses a study showing that rich people and poor people have different toxic substances in their bodies. She's the author of Pick Your Poison: How Our Mad Dash to Chemical Utopia Is Making Lab Rats of Us All.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A New Way of Killing Cancer

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

We’ll find out about how four people became connected and how those connections have changed lives. Esquire executive editor Mark Warren and writer-at-large Tom Junod went to Mississippi and the Gulf after Hurricane Katrina, where they met a woman named Stephanie Lee, whose husband had been killed in Iraq two months earlier and who was 9 months pregnant when Katrina hit. Years later the magazine wrote about a scientist/mathematician named Dr. Eric Schadt. Then, when Stephanie Lee was diagnosed with colon cancer, Warren and Junod connected her with Dr. Schadt, who is now Chairman of the Mount Sinai Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences and Director of the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology. He accepted Stephanie into a study on developing a new, personalized means of killing cancers. Junod and Warren are authors of “There’s a Whole New Way of Killing Cancer: Stephanie Lee Is the Test Case” in Esquire.

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New Tech City

I Love You Mother Earth, But I Love My iPhone More

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

You love the planet and your gadgets, so how do you find a balance?

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Radiolab

Born Wet, Human Babies Are 75 Percent Water. Then Comes Drying

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

A fresh tomato is 93.5 percent water. A fresh baby girl or boy is 75 percent water. A banana, 74 percent. We all start wet, and then, inevitably, dry. A 1-year-old baby carries 10 percent less water; a male adult 15 percent less. Life is a slow evaporation, with some curious exceptions.

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Radiolab

Otzi Confirms: Tattoos Have Always Been Cool

Monday, November 25, 2013

Producer Andy Mills takes a close look at Ötzi's ink -- the roughly 5,300-year-old Iceman has more than 50 tattoos etched into his skin. (PS: If you haven't listened yet, check out our latest short, all about Ötzi, An Ice-Cold Case).

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Radiolab

An Eyeful of Otzi

Monday, November 25, 2013

After you listen to our latest short, An Ice-Cold Case, check out these photos of Ötzi the Iceman (seriously, listen first or else this post will ruin a few surprises...).

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Features

An Omnivore's Dilemma: Would You Eat Michael Pollan Microbe Cheese?

Monday, November 25, 2013

Making your own cheese and yogurt is all the rage these days. Now a scientist has taken the DIY craze to an entirely new level. She and an artist have made cheeses using the microcritters on their own skin, as well as those from famous folks. The curds are on display at a museum.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

A Fight to Save Kids and Change Science

Monday, November 25, 2013

Wall Street Journal reporter Amy Dockser Marcus discusses her investigative health piece, “Trials.” For six years, The Wall Street Journal followed a group of parents and scientists seeking a treatment for a rare and fatal genetic disease (Niemann-Pick Type C) that strikes primarily children. Their collaboration accelerated development of a promising drug and, along the way, pushed the boundaries of medical science itself.

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The Takeaway

World Powers Reach Deal With Iran on Nuclear Program | Revisiting the Dark and Toxic Tale of Love Canal | 'One Red Rose' Sets JFK's Assassination to Music

Monday, November 25, 2013

World Powers Reach Deal With Iran on Nuclear Program | In Harm's Way: The Faces of Gun Violence | Labor Dispute Causes Boeing to Take Flight from Seattle | FCC May Lift Cell Phone Airplane Ban | Revisiting the Dark and Toxic Tale of Love Canal | 'One Red Rose' ...

The Leonard Lopate Show

Pursuing Promising Drugs; Egyptomania; "Young Lakota"; the ACLU and NSA Surveillance

Monday, November 25, 2013

Wall St. Journal reporter Amy Dockser Marcus describes following a group of parents and scientists for six years, as they worked together to find a treatment for a rare and fatal genetic disease. Bob Brier looks at why we’re still obsessed with the mummies, pyramids and hieroglyphics of Ancient Egypt after 3,000 years. Marion Lipschutz and Rose Rosenblatt tell us about their documentary “Young Lakota,” about the political awakening of a Lakota woman, Sunny Clifford, who also joins us. And the ACLU’s Jameel Jaffer gives us an overview of what we now know about the government’s surveillance programs.

Radiolab

The Iceman Speaks

Friday, November 22, 2013

Stefan Merrill Block, a novelist and friend of our show, reads his haunting short story from the perspective of Ötzi the Iceman (the mysterious figure at the center of our latest short, An Ice-Cold Case).

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