Streams

 

Science

Man Killed In Shark Attack Off Maui

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

A shark bit the dangling foot of a kayaker who was fishing between Maui and Molokini, a small island that is a popular diving and snorkeling spot.

Comment

The Takeaway

Scientists Discover Surprisingly Bright Black Hole

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

Turns out black holes really aren't so black. A team of researchers has discovered an incredibly bright black hole located some 22 million light years away in the neighboring Pinwheel Galaxy. It’s twice as bright as astronomers ever thought possible. Joining The Takeaway to explain is Joel Bregman, co-author of the study and professor of astronomy at the University of Michigan.

Comments [2]

The Brian Lehrer Show

The Southern Pine Beetle in New Jersey

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

The New Jersey Pinelands are under attack from the southern pine beetle, as warmer temperatures (particularly in winter) have allowed the insect to spread northward. Aaron Weed, postdoctoral researcher at Dartmouth, is the lead author of a paper on the effects of climate change on North American forests and has looked at the southern pine beetle's presence in New Jersey. He explains the beetle's spread and what it tells us about dangers to forests in the region. 

 

Comments [3]

Comet ISON Is No More, NASA Says

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

There were hopes over the weekend that ISON might have survived its close encounter with the sun. But "with more than a little sadness," the space agency says, "we have to declare the comet lost."

Comment

The Takeaway

Unrest in Ukraine Escalates | Scientists Discover Surprisingly Bright Black Hole | Is Technology Killing the Magic of the Holidays?

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

Rail Safety Questions Raised After NY Train Derails | Unrest Grows in Ukraine as Protesters Demand Regime Change | Scientists Discover Surprisingly Bright Black Hole | As Hours Wane, Can Congress Get Productive? | Is the Constitution to Blame for D.C. Gridlock? | Is Technology Killing the Magic of the ...

Alleged Perils Of Left-Handedness Don't Always Hold Up

Monday, December 02, 2013

Left-handedness has been linked to everything from early death to schizophrenia over the past 150 years. While the associations spark curiosity and sometimes concern, it's been difficult to draw solid scientific conclusions, one way or the other.

Comment

The Truth About The Left Brain / Right Brain Relationship

Monday, December 02, 2013

Is the idea that the left hemisphere of the brain is more logical and the right more intuitive a scientific fact or a cultural fiction? Commentator Tania Lombrozo turns to an expert for answers.

Comment

I'm Not Just Gaming, Ma! I'm Helping The World's Farmers

Monday, December 02, 2013

A computer game wants you to help survey the world's cropland. The hope is that the map will be used by organizations around the globe that are working with farmers to manage their crops better and get more out of each harvest.

Comment

Why You Can't Tickle Yourself

Sunday, December 01, 2013

You can't tickle yourself because you can't surprise your own brain. But could you do it if you could trick your brain into thinking you were someone else? Host Rachel Martin talks to professor Jakob Hohwy of Monash University in Australia to learn about his experiment with illusion and reality, and the rubber hand.

Comment

Saving The Native Prairie — One Black-Footed Ferret At A Time

Sunday, December 01, 2013

Biologists armed with truck-mounted spotlights, flea spray, and anti-plague vaccine roam the South Dakota grasslands each night, five months a year, as part of a 30-year rescue mission.

Comment

Tech Leaders, Economists Split Over Clean Energy's Prospects

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Renewable energy has become a $220 billion a year industry. But to significantly slow climate change, the power of wind, solar and other renewable sources must vastly expand. Some say the tech breakthroughs needed are on the horizon, though a top economist sees a tougher road ahead.

Comment

Radiolab

Science Reporter Emily Graslie Reads Her Mail — And It's Not So Nice

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Reporter Emily Graslie explores natural history museums, showing us what's going on behind the scenes. Her viewers write her, of course, and in this video, she reads some of those letters. They're not about science. Or Museums. They're about Emily. And it's embarrassing.

Read More

Comments [2]

Science Reporter Emily Graslie Reads Her Mail — And It's Not So Nice

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Reporter Emily Graslie explores natural history museums, showing us what's going on behind the scenes. Her viewers write her, of course, and in this video, she reads some of those letters. They're not about science. Or Museums. They're about Emily. And it's embarrassing.

Comment

'Forecast Bust:' Why 2013 Hurricane Predictions Were So Wrong

Friday, November 29, 2013

Forecasters expected the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season to be really busy — the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration told Americans to expect between seven and 11 hurricanes. But this year has been one of the quietest on record. Why were the predictions so far off?

Comment

Eating 'Wilder' Foods for a Healthier Diet

Friday, November 29, 2013

In Eating on the Wild Side, author Jo Robinson reveals how the nutrition and flavor has been bred out of supermarket fruits and vegetables. Robinson tells us what we can do to reclaim our wild roots and the nutrition from our foods.

Comment

On The Media

Stats Man

Friday, November 29, 2013

If an NFL announcer sounds like an omniscient know-er of all things football, it's because they've got a stats man in the booth feeding them info. 75-year-old Marty Aronoff is one of the best stats men in the business. Bob talks with Aronoff about stats and his 200 travel days a year getting to games. 

Comments [3]

Brain Cells 'Geotag' Memories To Cache What Happened — And Where

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Scientists have identified special cells in the brain's hippocampus that mimic a trick of some digital cameras. These cells automatically 'tag' the memory of each event in our lives with information about where that event took place — the better to recall, perhaps, where we left our lost keys.

Comment

Radiolab

The Power of Music

Thursday, November 28, 2013

The physical and psychological power of music... from a Disco hit that saves lives, to Beethoven's drive to push listeners to the brink.

 

Comments [6]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Toxins in Our Bodies

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Industrial hygienist and chemist Monona Rossol discusses a study showing that rich people and poor people have different toxic substances in their bodies. She's the author of Pick Your Poison: How Our Mad Dash to Chemical Utopia Is Making Lab Rats of Us All.

Comments [21]

The Leonard Lopate Show

A New Way of Killing Cancer

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

We’ll find out about how four people became connected and how those connections have changed lives. Esquire executive editor Mark Warren and writer-at-large Tom Junod went to Mississippi and the Gulf after Hurricane Katrina, where they met a woman named Stephanie Lee, whose husband had been killed in Iraq two months earlier and who was 9 months pregnant when Katrina hit. Years later the magazine wrote about a scientist/mathematician named Dr. Eric Schadt. Then, when Stephanie Lee was diagnosed with colon cancer, Warren and Junod connected her with Dr. Schadt, who is now Chairman of the Mount Sinai Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences and Director of the Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology. He accepted Stephanie into a study on developing a new, personalized means of killing cancers. Junod and Warren are authors of “There’s a Whole New Way of Killing Cancer: Stephanie Lee Is the Test Case” in Esquire.

Comments [3]