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Science

How Plastic In The Ocean Is Contaminating Your Seafood

Friday, December 13, 2013

Fish can absorb toxic chemicals that have been dumped into waterways, but they can also get them from eating plastic. And there's a lot of plastic in the open ocean, which scientists say can act like a sponge, soaking up the chemicals already out there.

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Chinese Ag Scientists Charged With Stealing Patented Seeds

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Two men are charged in Kansas and six others in Iowa with conspiring to steal patented seeds from some of the nation's leading seed developers.

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Why Meningitis That Hit Princeton Is Hard To Beat With Vaccines

Thursday, December 12, 2013

It turns out that the bacteria that are responsible meningitis B have a sugar coating that makes them look a lot like human cells. That similarity makes development of a vaccine against the germs especially tricky.

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So Much For The 'Mozart Effect'

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Harvard graduate students testing preschoolers who got music training said they could not establish a link between the exposure and improved IQs.

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On The Media

TLDR #9 - The Second Life of Marion Stokes

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Marion Stokes was a hoarder. When she died last year, her family had to figure out what to do with 9 separate residences and 3 storage locations full of stuff - everything from tens of thousands of books to decades-old Apple computers. This is the story of how they found a home for the strangest artifact in her collection — 140,000 videocassettes filled with 35 years of round-the-clock cable TV news.

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On The Media

#9 - The Second Life of Marion Stokes

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Marion Stokes was a hoarder. When she died last year, her family had to figure out what to do with 9 separate residences and 3 storage locations full of stuff - everything from tens of thousands of books to decades-old Apple computers. This is the story of how they found a home for the strangest artifact in her collection — 140,000 videocassettes filled with 35 years of round-the-clock cable TV news.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Gray Squirrel is Not a Native New Yorker

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Gray squirrels may seem like they've always been in New York City, but they're actually a fairly recent immigrant. History Professor Etienne Benson  explains why the rodents were introduced into the city at the end of the 19th century.

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The Takeaway

Desperately Seeking a Cure for Alzheimer's

Thursday, December 12, 2013

More than 5 million Americans suffer with Alzheimer’s disease and by 2050 that number is expected to nearly triple. All this week, our partner WGBH has been exploring efforts by leading researchers in labs around the country who are trying to find better treatments and ultimately a cure for Alzheimer's disease. The Takeaway talks with WGBH and WCAI senior reporter and editor, Sean Corcoran about his series: "Desperate for a Cure: The Search for New Alzheimer's Treatments."    

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NASA: Trouble With Space Station Cooling System Is No Emergency

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

One of two systems used to dissipate heat from the station's onboard system is acting up, but the space agency says it's not a dangerous situation for the moment.

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Scientists Map Vast Reserves Of Freshwater Under The Seabed

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Scientists think there are potentially valuable fresh groundwater reserves under the sea. There's more than all the water that was ever pumped up in the last century.

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Staph Germs Hide Out In The Hidden Recesses Of Your Nose

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

People who have surgery or are hospitalized for serious illnesses sometimes develop dangerous staph infections. The culprits can be bacteria that were living on people all along. Scientists say the germs thrive in remote parts of the nose that aren't typically tested. Other benign microbes might help keep the bad ones at bay.

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Wake Up, Rosetta! Europeans Begin Checklist For Comet Landing

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

The European Space Agency's probe has spent the last decade doing flybys of Earth and Mars to match comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's speed.

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Chowing Down On Meat, Dairy Alters Gut Bacteria A Lot, And Quickly

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Shifting to a diet that's packed with pork, cheese and eggs has a big influence on the trillion of bacteria living in our guts, even after just a few days, new research shows. And some of these changes probably aren't so good. One type of microbe that flourishes under the meat-based diet has been linked to diseases in mice.

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To Fight Meningitis Outbreak, Princeton Tries European Vaccine

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

The vaccine made by Novartis isn't approved for general use in the United States. But the Food and Drug Administration is allowing it on the Princeton campus. The university is offering the vaccine to students and some other people on campus through Thursday.

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WATCH: Goats Escape Avalanche

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

A herd of goats make a seemingly miraculous escape from an avalanche in the Alps.

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Fresh Research Finds Organic Milk Packs In Omega-3s

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Organic milk contains about 62 percent more omega-3s than milk from cows on conventional dairy farms, a new U.S.-based study finds. To get the full boost of these healthful fatty acids, you'll need to drink whole milk.

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Microbiome Candy: Could A Probiotic Mint Help Prevent Cavities?

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Lacing a sugar-free candy with the right kind of bacteria might one day help fight off tooth decay, a study suggests. The experimental mint lowered the levels of cavity-causing bacteria in volunteers' saliva. But the microbe candy still has a long way to go before it reaches shelves at Walgreens.

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What Happened On Easter Island — A New (Even Scarier) Scenario

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Whatever happened on Easter Island, it wasn't good. Polynesians landed there, farmed, thrived, built their famous statues, and then things went very bad, very fast. Sixteen million trees vanished. What happened? Was this a case of ecological collapse? Not exactly, say two anthropologists. It was, arguably, worse than that.

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Radiolab

What Happened On Easter Island — A New (Even Scarier) Scenario

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Whatever happened on Easter Island, it wasn't good. Polynesians landed there, farmed, thrived, built their famous statues, and then things went very bad, very fast. Sixteen million trees vanished. What happened? Was this a case of ecological collapse? Not exactly, say two anthropologists. It was, arguably, worse than that.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart!; Extraordinary High School Drama; "Regular Singing" at The Public Theater; Neutrinos

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

On today’s show: Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart talk about performing Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” and Pinter’s “No Man’s Land” in repertory on Broadway.Then, we’ll look at the remarkable theater program at a high school in Levittown, Pennsylvania. Playwright Richard Nelson and actors Maryann Plunkett and Jay O. Sanders discuss collaborating on “Regular Singing,” which is in repertory with Nelson’s other Apple Family plays at the Public Theater. Astrophysicist Ray Jayawardhana explains what neutrinos are and why scientists are looking for them to help explain the secrets of the universe.