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Science

Tonight's Meteor Shower: Live, From Space, It's The Quadrantids

Thursday, January 02, 2014

If you haven't heard of the Quadrantids, don't worry. Even NASA calls them "a little-known meteor shower named after an extinct constellation." But in the Northern Hemisphere, they can be well worth watching.

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On The Media

Two Professors Search the Internet for Time Travelers

Thursday, January 02, 2014

It’s hard not to like this. Professors Robert J Nemiroff and Teresa Wilson published a study where they looked online for some sign that time travelers from the future are hiding among us, accidentally revealing themselves on the internet.

 

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How Language Seems To Shape One's View Of The World

Thursday, January 02, 2014

Research suggests that speaking another language fluently changes what you pay attention to and how you remember events. But some say the idea that language can make you see and think differently is overblown.

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A Graduate Program Works To Diversify The Science World

Thursday, January 02, 2014

Women and African-Americans are underrepresented among science and engineering graduate students. The Bridge Program, a collaboration between Fisk and Vanderbilt Universities, is working on changing this. And other programs are learning from its approach.

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Radiolab

Animal Loses Head But Remembers Everything

Thursday, January 02, 2014

They're little flatworms that glide along riverbeds and perform miracles. Chop off their tails, they grow them back. Split them in half, they grow whole again. But chop off their heads, and not only do they grow new heads, but those new heads contain old memories! Whoa!

 

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Freakonomics Radio

What’s the “Best” Exercise?

Thursday, January 02, 2014

Most people blame lack of time for being out of shape. So maybe the solution is to exercise more efficiently.

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On Being

Marilynne Robinson and Marcelo Gleiser — The Mystery We Are [remix]

Thursday, January 02, 2014

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On Being

[Unedited] Marilynne Robinson and Marcelo Gleiser with Krista Tippett

Thursday, January 02, 2014

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More Than 300 Sharks In Australia Are Now On Twitter

Wednesday, January 01, 2014

Government researchers tagged the sharks with transmitters, triggering an automatic tweet when they swim close to a beach. This comes after several high-profile shark attacks, some of them fatal.

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On The Media

If you're using a picture you find on the internet, you might want to know where it came from

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

See the picture that leads this article? It's pretty intense, right? Techdirt shared a story this morning from a couple weeks ago about an anti-immigrant conservative Florida political group that posted this image on its Facebook. The only problem is that the image was lifted from the video game Bioshock Infinite, and was specifically intended to parody uncritical nationalism.

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Animal Loses Head But Remembers Everything

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

They look like fettuccine come to life — little flatworms that glide along riverbeds and perform miracles. Chop off their tails, they grow them back. Split them in half, they grow whole again. But chop off their heads, and not only do they grow new heads, but those new heads contain old memories! Whoa!

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Lost Images Come To Life A Century After Antarctic Expedition

Monday, December 30, 2013

Conservators have recovered and processed a clump of 22 negatives taken during Ernest Shackleton's 1914-1917 expedition to the South Pole.

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Radiolab

The Times They Are a-Changin'

Monday, December 30, 2013

At the start of this new year we crack open some fossils, peer back into ancient seas, and look up at lunar skies to find that a year is not quite as fixed as we thought it was.

 

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On Evolution, A Widening Political Gap, Pew Says

Monday, December 30, 2013

The latest poll shows that a growing number of Republicans reject the scientific theory of evolution, while three-quarters of Democrats accept it.

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WNYC News

Mapping Emotions On The Body: Love Makes Us Warm All Over

Monday, December 30, 2013

How do you know you're in love? Angry? Or sad? Emotions start off in the brain, then ripple through the whole body. Now scientists have charted where we consciously feel specific emotions. They hope these sensation maps will one day help diagnose and treat mood disorders.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Top Science Stories of 2013

Monday, December 30, 2013

Gemma Tarlach, senior associate editor of Discover magazine, discusses the top 10 science stories of 2013, from new signs of life on Mars to the clash between technology and privacy.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Winter Gardening; "The Armstrong Lie"; "La Soiree"; Top Science Stories of 2013

Monday, December 30, 2013

Gerard Lordahl, director of the Open Space Greening Program at Grow NYC, gives us tips for caring for your house plants and gardens in the cold winter months. Alex Gibney talks about his latest documentary, “The Armstrong Lie.” We’ll talk to some of the stars of “La Soiree,” a new take on cabaret, sideshows, burlesque and variety shows. Discover magazine editor Gemma Tarlach discusses the top 10 science stories of 2013.

Security, Logistics Problems Plague Syria's Weapons Removal

Sunday, December 29, 2013

The end of December is a crucial deadline for removing chemical weapons from Syria. Now the OPCW, the international organization overseeing that transfer, is backing away from that deadline. NPR's Geoff Brumfiel discusses the plan for chemical weapons removal and disposal, and why it's been so hard.

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Centuries Before China's 'Great Wall,' There Was Another

Sunday, December 29, 2013

Archaeologists are now mapping a wall in eastern China that is as much as 15 feet tall in some places, and predates the more famous barrier by 300 years. Hundreds of miles long, it was likely erected to keep neighboring Chinese dynasties from invading each other, historians say.

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The Hunt For Meteorites Begins In Antarctica

Saturday, December 28, 2013

Each winter, a team of scientists sets out on a search for those rare shooting stars that make it to the ground instead of burning up in the sky. There aren't many better places to look for these space rocks than Antarctica, often in areas where no human has set foot before.

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