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Science

The Takeaway

Water in America: In the Tap We Trust?

Friday, January 17, 2014

How did America’s water system get the way it is today? Martin Melosi, author of The Sanitary City and professor of history at the University of Houston, explains. Jennifer Weidhaas, assistant professor of Environmental Engineering at West Virginia University; Mark Davis, director of the Institute on Water Resources Law and Policy at Tulane University Law School; and David Soll, Assistant Professor in the Watershed Institute for Collaborative Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire, provide a snapshot of what the water is like in three different regions of the U.S.

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The Takeaway

Developing Innovative Ways to Fund Science

Friday, January 17, 2014

On the surface, crowdfunding science research provides an opportunity to close the divide between the scientists and the general public. But how effective are these efforts? Heather Goldstone, science editor with our partner WGBH, has been reporting on new crowdsourcing in scientific funding. Ralph Keeling, director of the Scripps CO2 and O2 programs at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, is also tapping the power of crowdfunding. He joins The Takeaway to explain his efforts to help fund his work.

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The Takeaway

Obama Announces Overhaul of NSA Surveillance Programs | Water in America: In the Tap We Trust? | Developing Innovative Ways to Fund Science

Friday, January 17, 2014

Water in America: In the Tap We Trust? | The Delicate Dance of U.S. Spy Agencies | Obama Announces Overhaul of NSA Surveillance Programs | The Evolution of Hollywood Movie Villains | Developing Innovative Ways to Fund Science

Radiolab

Black Box

Friday, January 17, 2014

This hour, we examine three very different kinds of black boxes—those peculiar spaces where it’s clear what’s going in, we know what’s coming out, but what happens in-between is a mystery.

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Science Friday

SciFri: Science Goes to the Movies: ‘Her’

Thursday, January 16, 2014

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Science Friday

SciFri: Medicine's Gender Gap

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for American women. Yet women make up only a third of subjects in cardiovascular clinical trials.

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Science Friday

SciFri: How Fins Gave Way to Feet

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Tiktaalik roseae was a fish that had scales, gills, and limb-like front fins.

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Science Friday

SciFri: Scott Stossel: My Age of Anxiety

Thursday, January 16, 2014

An estimated one out of seven Americans suffers from anxiety.

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Science Friday

SciFri: Is the Universe Built on Math?

Thursday, January 16, 2014

In The Mathematical Universe, physicist Max Tegmark argues that the universe is completely mathematical.

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Radiolab

Thomas Jefferson Needs A Dead Moose Right Now To Defend America

Thursday, January 16, 2014

There are no moose in America, said the French count to Thomas Jefferson. They don't exist there. Americans see a reindeer and just call it a new name, saying it's bigger. But the only thing that's big here is your American imagination. Jefferson was incensed. You are an ignoramus, he said tactfully. Then he promised to deliver an American moose to Paris. Here's what happened next.

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Why Sugar Makes Us Feel So Good

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Why does sugar leave our brains crying, "More! More! More!"? A neuroscientist and research psychologist who studies sugar addiction breaks it down for us in a clever new TED-Ed video.

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Freakonomics Radio

Fear Thy Nature (Rebroadcast)

Thursday, January 16, 2014

What "Sleep No More" and the Stanford Prison Experiment tell us about who we really are.

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The Takeaway

Why Women Don't Brag—And Why They Should | A Cryptologist's Critique of NSA Reforms | Could the Supreme Court Upend the TV Business?

Thursday, January 16, 2014

A Cryptologist's Critique of NSA Reforms | West Virginians Report Illness From Water | Enter Our SoupOrBowl Recipe Contest! | Air Force Nuke Officers Caught In Cheating Scandal | Could the Supreme Court Upend the TV Business? | Why Women Don't Brag—And Why They Should

The Takeaway

Why Women Don't Brag—And Why They Should

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Research shows that men are far more likely to brag than women—women feel anxiety and discomfort about bragging and tend to subscribe to a more traditional idea of modesty. But what if you could find the source of that anxiety and eliminate it? Jessi Smith, an Associate Professor of Psychology at Montana State University, discusses her research and what it means for women in the workplace.

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Pregnant Women Warned Against Drinking Water In W.Va. Area

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

The CDC says pregnant women should stick to bottled water until all traces of a coal-treatment chemical are gone from the local water supply.

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Innovation: A Charger That Keeps Your Phone Germ-Free

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

One in six of our cellphones have fecal bacteria on them. That gross-out stat inspired some bacteria-zapping innovation.

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The Takeaway

The End of Equal Internet Access? | What Another Round of Sanctions Will Do to Iran | Lessons From the Most Innovative Eras in U.S. History

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

The End of Equal Internet Access? | Your Take: The Benefits of Bragging | Congress Finally Reveals New Spending Deal | NSA Can Spy on Computers Not Connected to the Web | Russia Just Expelled Another Journalist, and it’s a Big Problem | What Another Round of Sanctions Will Do to Iran | Examining The Most Innovative Eras in U.S. History |

The Leonard Lopate Show

Motherhood, Feminism and the Reality of the Biological Clock

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Tanya Selvaratnam weighs the pros and cons of delaying having children. Selvaratnam discusses fertility doctors, adoption counselors, reproductive health professionals, celebrities, feminists, journalists, and sociologists, and argues for more widespread education and open discussion about delayed motherhood. Her book The Big Lie: Motherhood, Feminism and the Reality of the Biological Clock is part personal account, part manifesto.

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The Takeaway

Today's Highlights | January 14, 2014

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Why Fortune 500 companies will end up becoming leaders in innovation—not tech start-ups like we are seeing today...In Detroit, a group of local and national philanthropists have put together a $330 million deal to save the Detroit Institute of Art collection...In Russia, 1.3 million have the life-threatening virus that causes AIDS. A look at Russia's HIV epidemic....

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Who's Got A Pregnant Brain?

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Something happened to dolphins. Then it happened to humans. Both creatures had good-sized brains when, for reasons no one truly understands, dolphin brains suddenly got larger and larger, until — 15 million years ago — they stopped growing. Two million years ago it was our turn. Our brains went from the size of an orange to the size of a cantaloupe. Why the start? Why the stop? Who's next?

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