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Science

Science Friday

SciFri: Crafting the 'Fastest Ice on Earth'

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Marc Norman obsessively monitors the ice at the Utah Olympic Oval to create the perfect skating surface.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

What Space Does to the Human Body

Thursday, February 06, 2014

New York Times reporter Kenneth Chang talks about how spending time in space affect the human body--from swollen heads to brittle bones to atrophied muscles and more. In his article "Bodies Not Made for Space," Chang looks at how NASA is working to understand these heath effects and solve them.

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Freakonomics Radio

What You Don’t Know About Online Dating

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Thick markets, thin markets, and the triumph of attributes over compatibility.

This episode is included in the Freakonomics #smartbinge podcast playlist at wnyc.org/smartbinge

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California Is So Dry, Some Diners Won't Get Water Unless They Ask

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Across the state, towns and cities now see waste in the the full water glasses left on diners' tables. Santa Cruz is one of the first California towns to bar restaurants from serving drinking water unless diners request it.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Humans Have Evolved to Reproduce, Not to be Healthy

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Are our bodies adapted to be a hunter-gatherer on the Serengeti? The answer is complicated. Harvard biologist Daniel E. Lieberman says we're actually still evolving, and that cultural factors are as important in shaping humans as biological ones.

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Electronic Tongues Are The Beer Snobs Of The Future

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Researchers in Barcelona have developed an electronic tongue that really knows the difference between a pilsner and a bock. It's still a prototype, but its creators say it could some day replace human taste testers.

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Do Black Holes Exist?

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Stephen Hawking wants to do away with black holes (as we know them) so he can save the two pillars of modern physics: general relativity and quantum mechanics. At stake is our understanding of the nature of space and time, and how matter affects, and is affected by, both.

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Ladies: Good Bacteria In Yogurt May Be Good For Waistlines, Too

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Women who took a probiotic commonly found in yogurts daily while on a diet regime lost significantly more weight and fat than their counterparts who received a placebo. The findings offer interesting hints about how probiotics might be interacting with the tiny microbes that live in our guts.

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Our Brains Rewrite Our Memories, Putting Present In The Past

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Even people with good memories can have a hard time remembering the past accurately. That may be because the brain is constantly editing memories, updating them with current information. This may make good evolutionary sense. But it also means that some of your cherished memories may be wrong.

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Radiolab

Big Fish Stories Getting Littler

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

She found them in the Key West library: an old stash of "Look at What I Caught!" photos, proud fishermen showing off their big catch of the day back in the 1950s, '60s, '80s. As she looked, she noticed something odd. Something important.

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Big Fish Stories Getting Littler

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

She found them in the Key West library: an old stash of "Look at What I Caught!" photos, proud fishermen showing off their big catch of the day back in the 1950s, '60s, '80s. As she looked, she noticed something odd. Something important.

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The Takeaway

Turns Out Humans Only Feel Four Basic Emotions

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Conventional scientific understanding holds that there are only six classic emotions: Happy, surprised, afraid, disgusted, angry, and sad. That is until now. A new study finds that, in fact, we don't even have six emotions—but only four "basic" emotions: Happy, sad, afraid/surprised, and angry/disgusted. Dr. Rachael Jack of the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology at the University of Glasgow, is one of the scientists behind this new finding. She joins The Takeaway to explain how we categorize emotions.

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The Takeaway

Keystone XL Pipeline: The Local Perspective

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Over the last few months, the Keystone XL pipeline has become a national controversy. While environmental groups protest the pipeline's expansion from Cushing, Oklahoma to Alberta, Canada, Congressional Republicans are pushing for the Obama Administration's approval. With the national debate in the headlines, The Takeaway hears from three reporters to examine the impact of the proposed pipeline. Mose Buchele, a state impact reporter for KUT in Austin, Texas; Katie Schubert, news director for KIOS Omaha, and Joe Wertz, a state impact reporter in Norman, Oklahoma, weigh in.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Dealing With Addiction

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Phillip Seymour Hoffman struggled with drug and alcohol abuse at the age of 22, then relapsed 23 years later, dying of a heroin overdose this past Sunday. Carrie Wilkens, clinical director of the Center for Motivation and Change and the co-author of Beyond Addiction: How Science and Kindness Help People Change helps lead a discussion about addiction, support, and treatment. If you've struggled with addiction, or have a loved one who has, what lessons can we draw from Hoffman's death? Call 212-433-9692...

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New Tech City

For a Better Memory, Hit 'Delete'

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Keep forgetting your mother's cell phone number? Don't worry. You're not alone. In this New Tech City interview, Columbia University Psychology professor Betsy Sparrow explains why it's so hard to remember things in the digital age and what you can do about it. 

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New Tech City

The Reason Why Internet Servers (Hopefully) Won't Destroy the Earth

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Search — not storage — is the biggest conundrum for big data. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How the Body Evolved; Polish Film; a Novel in the New Tales of the City Series; McCarthyism in NYC

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Evolutionary biologist Daniel E. Lieberman looks at how the human body has evolved over millions of years, and the conditions our bodies have not entirely adapted to, resulting in obesity and new but avoidable diseases like type 2 diabetes. Then, we’ll talk with director Kryzstztof Zanussi and two film restoration experts about a retrospective of Polish cinema curated by Martin Scorsese. Armistead Maupin discusses The Days of Anna Madrigal, the ninth installment in his Tales of the City series. And we’ll take look at the personal, physical and mental impact of McCarthyism on six New York City political activists.

The Takeaway

CVS to Stop Selling Tobacco Products | An Inside Look at the World of High Art Theft | Study: Humans Feel Only Four Basic Emotions

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Keystone XL Pipeline: The Local Perspective | A Look at Next Steps as Protests Continue in Ukraine | Lessons from the Revolution as Egypt Transitions to Democracy | Study: Humans Feel Only Four Basic Emotions | CVS Kicking the Habit: Pharmacy Chain to Stop Selling Tobacco Products | Recovering a Stolen Stradivarius: An Inside Look at the World of High Art Theft | How the March Against Fear Changed the Civil Rights Movement 

Watch The Creationism Vs. Evolution Debate: Ken Ham And Bill Nye

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Does it damage children to teach them biblical creationism? What are the costs of denying evolution, one of biology's core tenets? Those are the questions for Tuesday night, in a live debate between best-selling Christian author Ken Ham and Emmy Award-winning science educator Bill Nye.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Are Babies Born Good or Evil?

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Philosophers and psychologists have long believed that we begin life as blank moral slates, but Paul Bloom argues that we have a deep sense of good and evil when we’re born. In Just Babies The Origins of Good and Evil, he draws on groundbreaking research at Yale, he demonstrates that babies have a rudimentary sense of justice before they can talk. He also examines the morality of chimpanzees, violent psychopaths, religious extremists, and Ivy League professors, and explores our often puzzling moral feelings about sex, politics, religion, and race.

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