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The Takeaway

U.S. Looks to Target American With Drone | How Do They Do That? Olympic Freestyle Skiing & Ski Jump | The Hummus: A Humor Site for Muslim-Americans

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

U.S. Looks to Target American With Drone | How Do They Do That? Olympic Freestyle Skiing & Ski Jump | Shirley Temple Dead at 85 | An Inside Look at the Music of One Ring Zero | Perserving Hertiage & History in the Midsts of Unrest | Meet The Hummus, A ...

The Leonard Lopate Show

Reading a Newborn's DNA

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

New York Times reporter Anne Eisenberg talks about new technology that allows us to read the DNA of a newborn child and looks at the ethical questions such testing raises for parents and doctors. She’s joined by Dr. Robert Klitzman, professor of clinical psychiatry and bioethics at Columbia University, and Dr. Ed McCabe, the chief medical officer of the March of Dimes, who was active in the National Institutes of Health’s issuing of grants for research into the social, ethical and legal implications of being able to read the DNA blueprint of a newborn. Eisenberg’s article “The Path to Reading a Newborn’s DNA Map” appeared in the New York Times February 8.

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The Takeaway

How They Do That: Curling

Monday, February 10, 2014

The 2014 Sochi Olympics are in full swing, and today The Takeaway kicks off its series, "How Do They Do That?," on the scientific dynamics behind the winter games. All week, Eric Goff, physics professor at Lynchburg College and author of "Gold Medal Physics: The Science of Sports," will serve as The Takeaway's Olympic physicist, explaining the physics that push humans to their most extreme limits. Today, Goff looks at the physics behind curling with Brady Clark, reigning national curling champion.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Social Physics; John Hammond Plays Live; James Scott's New Novel; the Pope and Mussolini

Monday, February 10, 2014

MIT's Alex Pentland explains the emerging field of “social physics” - and what new research is showing us about how human ideas spread—and turn into behaviors. John Hammond performs live in our studio and tells us about his half century in music. James Scott on his novel, The Kept. And we'll find out about the complicated secret relationship between Pope Pius the 11th and Mussolini!

Copenhagen Zoo Euthanizes Giraffe Despite Online Protest

Sunday, February 09, 2014

Marius, a healthy 2-year-old male giraffe, was killed and his body carved up and fed to the lions. The zoo says it was simply trying to prevent inbreeding.

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Is It Enough Rain For Drought-Stricken California?

Sunday, February 09, 2014

The San Francisco Bay area has gotten about 3 inches so far this season, but normally it should have received 14.5 inches.

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Oil, Gas Drilling Seems To Make The Earth Slip And Go Boom

Sunday, February 09, 2014

People who have never experienced earthquakes are starting to feel rumbles, which scientists say may be linked to the rise in oil and gas activity. Along with the quakes are shockingly loud noises that can put residents on edge.

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Why Confounding Coincidences Happen Every Day

Sunday, February 09, 2014

David Hand, an emeritus professor of mathematics at Imperial College in London, believes that miracles and rare events actually aren't so uncommon. Hand speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about his new book, The Improbability Principle.

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Learning About Love From Prairie Vole Bonding

Sunday, February 09, 2014

The small mammals take on monogamous partners for their entire lives — a trait scientists say we might be able to learn from. Even when a partner dies, most prairie voles never take up another mate.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

It's Cold Outside, but the Planet's Still Heating Up

Friday, February 07, 2014

A look at the wacky weather we've been experiencing in the larger context of climate change. 

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The Takeaway

News Quiz | Week of February 7

Friday, February 07, 2014

Are you a newsie? Do you know what's happening from Washington to Hollywood? Are you one of those people who always need to know? Do you watch or listen to the news religiously, convinced that what you hear will give you an edge? Be smarter than your pals. Prep your dinner party factoids. Gauge your knowledge about what happened this week, as heard on The Takeaway.

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The Takeaway

Is Facebook the Best Place to Archive our Memories?

Friday, February 07, 2014

Since Facebook celebrated its tenth anniversary earlier this week, hundreds of millions of users have created their own "look-back" movies, a one-minute-long reflection on a user's most-liked posts and pictures since the site began. Researcher Sherry Turkle, professor of Science Technology and Society at MIT, explores Facebook's affect on how we perceive identity and memory.

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Oldest 'Out Of Africa' Human Footprints Found On British Coast

Friday, February 07, 2014

Scientists have found the oldest-known footprints outside Africa, dating from between 800,000 and 1 million years ago, on a beach facing the North Sea.

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The Right Way To Hug A Lion

Friday, February 07, 2014

You can cuddle them, live with them, protect them, but when animals look at you — even when they're purring or licking your face — what's really going on in their heads? In yours? A cartoonist explores this question.

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Who 'Won' The Creation Vs. Evolution Debate?

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Days after a wide-ranging debate on creationism and evolution between Bill Nye and Ken Ham, the topic is driving an online conversation about points raised in the debate. Themes of belief and literalism, logic and faith — and, for some, relevance — are being debated online.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The FDA, Antibiotics, and Animal Feed

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Antibiotic resistance claims 23,000 lives a year in the U.S.—and the overuse of antibiotics in livestock plays a role. Bryan Walsh looks at whether the FDA doing all it can to protect Americans, and looks at why antibiotics are used in animal feed in the first place and the risks of that practice. He’s written “New Report Says FDA Allowed “High Risk” Antibiotics to Be Used on Farm Animals.”

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The Greene Space

On-Demand Video: New Tech City's Tech, Music & the Brain with Laurie Anderson and Guests

Thursday, February 06, 2014

It was an evening of music and mind during a live event in The Greene Space on Tuesday, February 4.

New Tech City’s Manoush Zomorodi and Q2 Music’s Helga Davis talked tech, music and the brain with iconic performance artist, composer and musician Laurie AndersonMary Farbood, Assistant Professor in the Music Technology program at New York University, and Mari Kimura, Director of the Future Music Lab at the Atlantic Music Festival and an instructor at Juilliard.

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Radiolab

Fate, Fortune, and Fishing Birds

Thursday, February 06, 2014

 

We're pret-ty excited to introduce cartoonist Maki Naro to Radiolab. Maki puts pen to paper (well, metaphorically, because he really puts stylus to digital tablet) and creates magical comics inspired by science. For our Fate and Fortune episode, we asked Maki for his take...and he found himself thinking about marshmallows, birds, and beasts (i.e., us). To see his cartoon in its full glory, click on the image to make it full screen. 

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NASA Probe Finds Newly Formed Crater On Mars

Thursday, February 06, 2014

The impact that made the 100-foot-diameter scar threw Martian rock and soil more than 9 miles across the surface.

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Science Friday

SciFri: Ice Science a Slippery Quandary for Physicists

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Friction researcher and avid curler Robert Carpick discusses the tricky physics of ice.

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