Streams

 

Science

New Tech City

4 Ways to Boost Your Online Dating Returns

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

With more than 10 percent of American adults dating online, researchers are devoting serious attention to how singles can get it right, including tapping focus groups. Here's what they said. 

Read More

Comments [1]

New Tech City

Machine Learning + Love

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

As the popularity of online dating sites rises, algorithms are playing a big role in finding Mr. or Mrs. Right. So what will it take to make the machine smarter at finding us love? 

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

An Evening with Codebreakers

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Join our host John Hockenberry in New York City for an evening of music, drinks and conversation with two of the brightest lights in the mind-bending, down-the-rabbit hole world of codebreaking. This is the second edition of the WNYC Science Fair, a new series in The Greene Space that mixes your favorite public radio personalities with popular science, special performances with a few drinks.

Comments [3]

The Takeaway

Today's Highlights | February 11, 2014

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Also On Today's Show: The iconic depression-era child star Shirley Temple Black has passed away at the age of 85...The band “One Ring Zero” has released eight albums, including one where the lyrics were written by famous authors. Two band members discuss their innovative albums...Today The Takeaway gives you a look at the task of preserving the ancient art and artifacts of Egypt in a country plagued in recent years by unrest. 

Comment

You're The Last. The Very Last One. Now What Happens?

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

When "Benjamin," the world's last captive Tasmanian Tiger, died in 1936, a 23-million-year run of marsupial (pouch-bearing), doglike animals very likely disappeared from the planet. But before Benjy went, he had his revenge on the humans who hunted his kind to extinction.

Comment

Radiolab

You're The Last. The Very Last One. Now What Happens?

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

When "Benjamin," the world's last captive Tasmanian Tiger, died in 1936, a 23-million-year run of marsupial (pouch-bearing), doglike animals very likely disappeared from the planet. But before Benjy went, he had his revenge on the humans who hunted his kind to extinction.

Read More

Comments [1]

New Tech City

Drop the Smartphone and Love Me Already

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

A study released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center finds that a quarter of cell phone owners in serious relationships have felt that their partner was distracted by their device.

Read More

Comments [1]

The Leonard Lopate Show

Ethics and Reading DNA; the Rise and Fall of Penn Station; You Disappear; What You Should Know About Obamacare

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

On today’s show: we’ll examine the challenging ethical, social and legal questions posed by reading the DNA of a newborn. Then, a look at the building and sad destruction of Penn Station. Christian Jungersen discusses his new novel, You Disappear, about the way we understand others, and ourselves. Plus, we’ll get an update on the rollout of Obamacare is going and what consumers should know about enrolling!

The Leonard Lopate Show

Reading a Newborn's DNA

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

New York Times reporter Anne Eisenberg talks about new technology that allows us to read the DNA of a newborn child and looks at the ethical questions such testing raises for parents and doctors. She’s joined by Dr. Robert Klitzman, professor of clinical psychiatry and bioethics at Columbia University, and Dr. Ed McCabe, the chief medical officer of the March of Dimes, who was active in the National Institutes of Health’s issuing of grants for research into the social, ethical and legal implications of being able to read the DNA blueprint of a newborn. Eisenberg’s article “The Path to Reading a Newborn’s DNA Map” appeared in the New York Times February 8.

Comments [8]

The Takeaway

U.S. Looks to Target American With Drone | How Do They Do That? Olympic Freestyle Skiing & Ski Jump | The Hummus: A Humor Site for Muslim-Americans

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

U.S. Looks to Target American With Drone | How Do They Do That? Olympic Freestyle Skiing & Ski Jump | Shirley Temple Dead at 85 | An Inside Look at the Music of One Ring Zero | Perserving Hertiage & History in the Midsts of Unrest | Meet The Hummus, A ...

The Leonard Lopate Show

Social Physics; John Hammond Plays Live; James Scott's New Novel; the Pope and Mussolini

Monday, February 10, 2014

MIT's Alex Pentland explains the emerging field of “social physics” - and what new research is showing us about how human ideas spread—and turn into behaviors. John Hammond performs live in our studio and tells us about his half century in music. James Scott on his novel, The Kept. And we'll find out about the complicated secret relationship between Pope Pius the 11th and Mussolini!

The Takeaway

How They Do That: Curling

Monday, February 10, 2014

The 2014 Sochi Olympics are in full swing, and today The Takeaway kicks off its series, "How Do They Do That?," on the scientific dynamics behind the winter games. All week, Eric Goff, physics professor at Lynchburg College and author of "Gold Medal Physics: The Science of Sports," will serve as The Takeaway's Olympic physicist, explaining the physics that push humans to their most extreme limits. Today, Goff looks at the physics behind curling with Brady Clark, reigning national curling champion.

Comments [3]

Copenhagen Zoo Euthanizes Giraffe Despite Online Protest

Sunday, February 09, 2014

Marius, a healthy 2-year-old male giraffe, was killed and his body carved up and fed to the lions. The zoo says it was simply trying to prevent inbreeding.

Comment

Is It Enough Rain For Drought-Stricken California?

Sunday, February 09, 2014

The San Francisco Bay area has gotten about 3 inches so far this season, but normally it should have received 14.5 inches.

Comment

Oil, Gas Drilling Seems To Make The Earth Slip And Go Boom

Sunday, February 09, 2014

People who have never experienced earthquakes are starting to feel rumbles, which scientists say may be linked to the rise in oil and gas activity. Along with the quakes are shockingly loud noises that can put residents on edge.

Comment

Why Confounding Coincidences Happen Every Day

Sunday, February 09, 2014

David Hand, an emeritus professor of mathematics at Imperial College in London, believes that miracles and rare events actually aren't so uncommon. Hand speaks with NPR's Rachel Martin about his new book, The Improbability Principle.

Comment

Learning About Love From Prairie Vole Bonding

Sunday, February 09, 2014

The small mammals take on monogamous partners for their entire lives — a trait scientists say we might be able to learn from. Even when a partner dies, most prairie voles never take up another mate.

Comment

The Leonard Lopate Show

It's Cold Outside, but the Planet's Still Heating Up

Friday, February 07, 2014

A look at the wacky weather we've been experiencing in the larger context of climate change. 

Comments [24]

The Takeaway

News Quiz | Week of February 7

Friday, February 07, 2014

Are you a newsie? Do you know what's happening from Washington to Hollywood? Are you one of those people who always need to know? Do you watch or listen to the news religiously, convinced that what you hear will give you an edge? Be smarter than your pals. Prep your dinner party factoids. Gauge your knowledge about what happened this week, as heard on The Takeaway.

Comments [1]

The Takeaway

Is Facebook the Best Place to Archive our Memories?

Friday, February 07, 2014

Since Facebook celebrated its tenth anniversary earlier this week, hundreds of millions of users have created their own "look-back" movies, a one-minute-long reflection on a user's most-liked posts and pictures since the site began. Researcher Sherry Turkle, professor of Science Technology and Society at MIT, explores Facebook's affect on how we perceive identity and memory.

Comments [3]