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Fossil Fans Get Their Dino-Fix Before Smithsonian Renovates

Sunday, April 27, 2014

The Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., got its new T. rex just in time to close its fossil hall for five years of renovations — longer than some dinosaur fans have even been alive.

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Rare Observations Appear To Show Marmoset Grief In The Wild

Sunday, April 27, 2014

A monkey falls from a tree in Brazil; her male partner offers comfort as she dies. Anthropologist Barbara King says a new paper detailing the incident opens our eyes to the reality of animal emotions.

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Are Physicists Ready To Give Up The Chase For SUSY?

Saturday, April 26, 2014

It's been four decades since the idea of supersymmetry was proposed as a better way to explain the universe. The problem is, says commentator Marcelo Gleiser, that we haven't been able to prove it.

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TRBQ: The Really Big Questions

TRBQ: Why Does Music Move Us?

Saturday, April 26, 2014

Music is one of the most ubiquitous forces in the world, permeating every culture without explanation as to why we are so affected by its touch. There's a reason why humans create music and why it's so heavily embedded into our lives -- but that reason isn't too clear. In this episode of "The Really Big Questions," musicians and researchers will attempt to explain the impact of music on the human brain.

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For New York, The '10-Year Storm' Isn't What It Used To Be

Friday, April 25, 2014

A new study says the worst floods in the city are both higher and 20 times more common than they were 170 years ago. But climate change is only part of the reason.

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All Things Considered

Family Tree Of Pertussis Traced, Could Lead To Better Vaccine

Friday, April 25, 2014

Scientists tracking the ancestry of whooping cough say it arose abruptly in humans about 500 years ago, caused by a mutated bacterium that once lived only in animals. Genetic tricks helped it spread.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

When the Apocalypse Comes, What Will You Have to Offer?

Friday, April 25, 2014

Astrobiologist Lewis Dartnell explores all the knowledge we've accumulated over the millennia in the form of a guide to restarting civilization post-catastrophe.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Do You Deserve to Be on Our Post-Apocalypse Team? Convince Us.

Friday, April 25, 2014

Astrobiologist Lewis Dartnell wrote a very serious book about the end of the world and the various environmental, medical, and societal issues that would arise if we had to rebuild civilization on Earth. When the Brian Lehrer Show spoke with him, they asked callers a slightly sillier question.

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'Don't Touch Me,' Said Canada. 'I Won't!' Said The U.S.A. So They Moved 20 Feet Apart

Friday, April 25, 2014

Canada and the U.S.A. agreed to create a 20-foot-wide corridor between them that runs for 5,500 continuous miles. Cartographers drew the line straight, but engineers built it crooked. Take a look.

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'Blood Victory' In Medical Research Dispute

Friday, April 25, 2014

The Havasupai Native American tribe celebrated Blood Victory Day this week. That's the anniversary of their legal victory over researchers who misused members' blood samples without proper consent.

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TED Radio Hour

What Happens To Our Brain When We're In Love?

Friday, April 25, 2014

Why do we crave love so much? To learn about our need for romantic love, anthropologist Helen Fisher took MRIs of people in love — and people who had just been dumped.

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Morning Edition

Got My Goat? Vermont Farms Put Fresh Meat On Refugee Tables

Friday, April 25, 2014

Americans don't eat much barbecued goat, but the meat is a mainstay in many African, Asian and Caribbean diets. In Vermont, farmers raise it for refugees and immigrants, and hope to mainstream it.

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PRI's The World

Brazil's new Internet 'Bill of Rights' aims to protect the country's privacy

Friday, April 25, 2014

Brazil has been an outspoken critic of the NSA's electronic eavesdropping program, and especially of the private companies that have gone along with it. This week, Brazil's government adopted a wide-ranging law to rein in what it sees as digital abuses.

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PRI's The World

It's strange, but true — this is a praying mantis wearing 3-D glasses

Friday, April 25, 2014

Praying mantises are being recruited into vision research. That means a tiny version of the special specs you get when you watch a 3-D movie. It turns out the insects might help us design better 3-D vision tech.

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The Takeaway

Big Data & TV by the Numbers | Should Animals Have the Same Rights as People? | 'X-Men' Accusations & Out-of-Control Hollywood Culture

Friday, April 25, 2014

Big Data TV: David Simon & Beau Willimon on Entertainment by The Numbers | The Rise of Media in Democratic Afghanistan | New Movie Reviews of The Week | 'X-Men' Director's Rape Allegations Raise Questions of Out-of-Control Culture | The Movie Date Reviews This Weekend's Big Releases | Should Animals Have ...

The Brian Lehrer Show

Bait and Tackling

Friday, April 25, 2014

By noon today, members of Northwestern’s football team will have voted on forming a union. You can cast your own ballots on the issue during our call-in segment. Plus: after the end of the world, how would we rebuild and what would you contribute?; the behind-the-scenes look at prepping for universal pre-k; a progressive push for more cops; and an illustrator’s tour of New York City.

PRI's The World

Brazilians welcome genetically-modified mosquito to help fight dengue fever

Friday, April 25, 2014

Dengue Fever is one of the biggest killers in tropical countries. It's carried by mosquitoes that have proven tough to eradicate, so now officials in Brazil are trying a new approach: mosquitoes that have been genetically modified.

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Radioactive Leak At U.S. Waste Dump Was Preventable, Report Says

Thursday, April 24, 2014

The Feb. 14 release of radioactive material at the facility in New Mexico that contaminated 21 workers was due to poor management and lack of oversight, the Department of Energy says.

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Radiolab

Fluffier, Brighter, Weirder Dinosaurs

Thursday, April 24, 2014

John Conway paints pictures of old dead things. But he doesn't paint them like they're old and dead—he paints them like maybe they’re outside your window right now, looking at you.
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Science Friday

SciFri: Thoreau, Climate Scientist

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Scientists use Henry David Thoreau’s notes to study climate change at Walden Pond.

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