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Science

PRI's The World

Twitter's role in social protests was a surprise to co-founder Biz Stone

Friday, May 02, 2014

Twitter co-founder Biz Stone recounts how the social network he helped create started as just a fun product, but then became a platform for protest organizers worldwide and a global defender of free speech.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Watching the World and Remembering Dylan Thomas

Friday, May 02, 2014

Please Explain is all about eyes and how they process what we see. Teju Cole talks about his latest novel, Every Day Is for the Thief. Then, we’ll mark the 100th birthday of Dylan Thomas with a special co-production with the BBC—we’ll explore Thomas’s childhood in Wales, his time in NYC, and we’ll hear from some of his fans, like President Jimmy Carter!

On The Media

The Autism Channel

Friday, May 02, 2014

Launched in 2012, The Autism Channel aims covers the whole autism world. Some of the channel's hosts are on the autistic spectrum, and with autism diagnosis soaring, the station has a booming list of potential viewers. In a piece that aired in January 2013, OTM Producer Chris Neary went to West Palm Beach, the home of the channel, to investigate. (You can watch The Autism Channel through a Roku streaming player.)

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On The Media

Battling Bad Science

Friday, May 02, 2014

Stories about new innovations in health appear almost daily in the media, but the claims are frequently overblown, misleading, or completely false. In a TED talk from July, 2011, journalist Ben Goldacre talks about how to spot and avoid bad science.

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On The Media

Beall's List

Friday, May 02, 2014

Some academic journals have embraced a “gold open access model” of publishing, wherein the scholars whose work appears in the journal pay for the privilege. Bob speaks with Jeffrey Beall, an academic librarian at the University of Colorado Denver who has assembled a list of "predatory journals" - journals that may be more interested in profit than academic contributions

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On The Media

Piltdown at 100: A Look Back on Science's Biggest Hoax

Friday, May 02, 2014

A hundred years ago, a human-like skull and ape-like jaw were presented at a special meeting of the Geological Society in London. The so-called "Piltdown Man" became widely accepted as a crucial link in the human evolutionary chain; crucial, that is, until 1953, when the bones were exposed as a total hoax. In an interview from December of last year, Nova Senior Science Editor Evan Hadingham talks to Brooke about this tantalizing example of "scientific skullduggery."

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All Things Considered

Contagious Aphrodisiac? Virus Makes Crickets Have More Sex

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Researchers have stumbled upon a virus that makes crickets horny before it kills them. Inducing your host to mate more is a great way for a virus to spread its own genes.

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All Things Considered

For Red Deer, Iron Curtain Habits Die Hard

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Two decades after a Cold War-era fence came down, red deer in the Czech Republic remain reluctant to cross into Germany — a fact suggesting that some deer are capable of teaching certain behaviors.

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All Things Considered

'Provocative' Research Turns Skin Cells Into Sperm

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Scientists were able to make immature sperm cells. If they can make the sperm viable, researchers could help men who thought they'd never have kids. But the findings also raise ethical questions.

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Science Friday

SciFri: App Chat: Apps to Mind Your Money

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Forget balancing a checkbook. Today there are better ways for the budget-minded to keep track of bank balances.

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Science Friday

Nothing to Sneeze At

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Sneezes and coughs generate gas clouds that can spread germs farther than previously imagined.

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Science Friday

SciFri: Squarepusher Rocks with Bots

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Electronic musician Squarepusher talks about writing Music for Robots.

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Science Friday

Food Failures: Foraging Dos and Don'ts

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Professional forager Tama Matsuoka Wong gives tips for picking wild plants safely and sustainably.

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Science Friday

SciFri: Forty Years of Mindbending Success with the Rubik’s Cube

Thursday, May 01, 2014

The Rubik’s Cube has over 43 quintillion different starting combinations.

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Science Friday

Elephants Use Different 'Words' to Signal Danger

Thursday, May 01, 2014

African elephants use different types of rumbles to signal danger from bees or humans.

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Science Friday

Male Researchers May Increase Stress in Lab Mice

Thursday, May 01, 2014

The gender of a researcher might influence the stress levels of laboratory mice.

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New Virus Related To Smallpox Is Found In Republic Of Georgia

Thursday, May 01, 2014

Two men have been infected with a virus newly discovered in dairy cattle, scientists say. The disease causes blisters on the hands and arms, and other symptoms similar to those caused by smallpox.

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Freakonomics Radio

The Perfect Crime

Thursday, May 01, 2014

If you are driving and kill a pedestrian, there's a good chance you'll barely be punished. Why?

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Morning Edition

Experimental Technique Coaxes Muscles Destroyed By War To Regrow

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

By surgically transplanting material from pig bladders into the injured legs of several men, doctors prompted muscles to heal by growing and nurturing fresh, healthy cells.

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Nino's No-No: Justice Scalia Flubs Dissent In Pollution Case

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

It's more than embarrassing when a Supreme Court justice makes his decision based on facts that he's gotten wrong. The court has corrected the record, but the slip has stuck among legal cognoscenti.

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