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Science

Science Friday

Another Climate Report, But Who's Listening?

Thursday, May 08, 2014

The White House released its latest climate report this week, with much the same message as recent IPCC findings—climate change is real, and it's happening fast.

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Science Friday

What’s Shaking Up Oklahoma?

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Earthquakes have increased by 50 percent in Oklahoma since 2013 and may be linked to drilling disposal wells.

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Science Friday

The Serious Science of Humor

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Author Scott Weems lets us in on the jokes and uncovers the science of humor.

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Science Friday

Young Blood Sharpens Memory in Old Mice

Thursday, May 08, 2014

The blood of young mice seems to rejuvenate older mice, both strengthening their muscles and improving their ability to learn and remember.

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Science Friday

Science Goes to the Movies: 'Transcendence'

Thursday, May 08, 2014

SciFri’s scientist-film critics weigh in on the science behind the Hollywood techno-thriller Transcendence.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Genes, Race, and Human History

Thursday, May 08, 2014

New York Times science reporter Nicholas Wade discusses how the mapping of the genome is shaping new ideas about race and its role in the human story.

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If Polar Bears Can Eat A Ton Of Fat And Be Healthy, Why Can't We?

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Baby polar bears slurp milk that's 27 percent fat, and adults dine on seal blubber. Scientists think bears' adaptation to a high-fat diet might lead to better ways to treat human obesity.

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Radiolab

A Question Of Biggitude: What's The Largest Creature On Earth?

Thursday, May 08, 2014

What's the biggest living thing on Earth? I can think of two. I'm not sure which is biggest, but neither of them is a blue whale. These are weirder. Much, much weirder.

One is a tree. The other eats trees.

This is the tree.

J. ...

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The Takeaway

Rubbish: Uncovering the Truth About Trash

Thursday, May 08, 2014

What we throw away, where we toss it, and what gets recycled has been a concern for decades. As more and more Americans are living closer together in urban areas, the trash problem has become even bigger.

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Morning Edition

Study: Time Away Can Hurt Surgeons' Job Performance

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Surgeons need rest days, weekends and vacations. But when they come back to work after a break, do they come back refreshed — or rusty?

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Morning Edition

The Executioner's Lament

Thursday, May 08, 2014

When things go wrong during an execution, the people responsible for carrying it out experience stressful, chaotic scenes. But even when the process goes right, it can take a lasting toll.

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Morning Edition

Less Nutritious Grains May Be In Our Future

Thursday, May 08, 2014

When crops are surrounded by high levels of carbon dioxide, they're more productive. But they may have lower concentrations of some crucial nutrients, which could increase malnutrition in the future.

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Morning Edition

Civil War Invades An Elephant Sanctuary: One Researcher's Escape

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Andrea Turkalo spent 22 years in central Africa, studying rare forest elephants. Then civil war forced her to flee — and poachers killed many of the elephants she'd shared a life with.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Written in Our Genes and Moms on the Screen

Thursday, May 08, 2014

New York Times science reporter Nicholas Wade explores what mapping the human genome is revealing about the controversial and often contentious idea that there is a biological difference between races. Time movie critic Richard Corliss talks about how Hollywood has celebrated and vilified motherhood over the years. Stacey D’Erasmo discusses her novel, WonderlandScott Sherman talks about why the NYPL has abandoned the renovation plans for its 42nd Street building. We’ll find out about the most radioactive property in Queens, which has just been designated as a Superfund site. Plus, Clara Moskowitz, Associate Editor at Scientific American, on the discovery of a new super heavy atomic element.

The Takeaway

Wrongfully Convicted Man Fights for What's His | African Film Festival Sheds New Light on Nigeria | Rubbish: Uncovering the Problems With Trash

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Outrage Cripples Nigerians in Face of Kidnappings | After 10 Years Behind Bars, A Wrongfully Convicted Man Fights for What's His | Syrian Opposition Surrenders Homs | Rubbish: Uncovering the Problems With Trash | Can You Trust the Cops? | How Music & Technology Influence Each Other

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Freakonomics Radio

How to Think Like a Freak -- and Other FREAK-quently Asked Questions

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Stephen Dubner and Steve Levitt talk about their new book and field questions about prestige, university life, and (yum yum) bacon.

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All Things Considered

Stanford Dumps Its Holdings In Coal, With Climate In Mind

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

Stanford says it will its divest holdings in coal companies over climate change concerns. It's the most prominent of the roughly one dozen colleges that have decided to sell off fossil fuel holdings.

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All Things Considered

Chemists Expand Nature's Genetic Alphabet

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

DNA's instructions are written in a code of four molecular "letters," labeled A, C, T and G. For the first time, researchers have created and inserted two brand-new letters into a living cell.

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The Takeaway

What's a Bigger Threat: Terrorism or Climate Change?

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

At what point does climate change become a national security issue? One retired general explains why global climate change is not just an environmental issue but a military one, too.

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Draw My Left! No, No, My Other Left! A Hidden Bias In Art History Revealed

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

Why is it that in thousands of portraits done all over the world, artists emphasize the left side of the subject's face? There's a bias here, and it's hiding in our brains.

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