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Science

Is There Any Way To Screen The World's Pilots For Suicidal Tendencies?

Friday, March 27, 2015

There are questionnaires that aim to identify people at risk of killing themselves. But the tests are flawed — and it's not at all clear they'd be effective in assessing the mental state of pilots.

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TED Radio Hour

How Can Playing A Game Make You More Empathetic?

Friday, March 27, 2015

Why is it so hard to feel empathy for strangers? Because we're stressed by them, says neuroscientist Jeff Mogil. His research suggests one way to reduce that stress: play Rock Band together.

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TED Radio Hour

How Can Video Games Improve Our Real Lives?

Friday, March 27, 2015

When Jane McGonigal was bedridden after a concussion, she gave herself a prescription: play a game. She says games helped her get better, and for many of us, virtual games can improve our real lives.

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TED Radio Hour

What Can Bonobos Teach Us About Play?

Friday, March 27, 2015

Primatologist Isabel Behncke Izquierdo explains how bonobos learn by constantly playing. She says play isn't frivolous; it appears to be a critical way to solve problems and avoid conflict.

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Morning Edition

NASA To Study A Twin In Space And His Brother On Earth

Friday, March 27, 2015

During astronaut Scott Kelly's year in space, scientists will compare his physiology with that of his twin brother, Mark, to study the effect of prolonged space flight on the human body.

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On The Media

The War on Prevention

Friday, March 27, 2015

We tend to describe cancer with war metaphors: “battling” the disease, winning the “fight.” But this war language might actually be distorting how we think about cancer prevention.

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The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: A Troubled Co-Pilot, a Retiring Senate Leader, and Tying the Internet to the Real World

Friday, March 27, 2015

Today's Takeaways: A Troubled Co-Pilot, A Retiring Senate Leader, and Tying the Internet to the Real World

Official Report: Nuclear Waste Accident Caused By Wrong Cat Litter

Thursday, March 26, 2015

An official investigation into a 2014 accident at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant has concluded that cat litter is the culprit. Organic material in the litter caused a drum to burst.

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All Things Considered

Big Shelves Of Antarctic Ice Melting Faster Than Scientists Thought

Thursday, March 26, 2015

The rate at which the ice is shrinking at the ocean's edge in the West Antarctic has increased by 70 percent over the past decade, an analysis of satellite measurements suggests.

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All Things Considered

Critic Faults Alcoholics Anonymous For Lack Of Evidence

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Writer Gabrielle Glaser challenges the usefulness of Alcoholics Anonymous in April's issue of The Atlantic. The program's tenets aren't based in science, she says, and other options may work better.

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Is Colorado Primed To Become The Silicon Valley Of Agriculture?

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Colorado's food and ag industries have been growing two to four times faster than the state's economy overall. The state's economists are ever more hopeful about cornering the market on ag innovation.

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Ebola Is Not Mutating As Fast As Scientists Feared

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Many people have worried that Ebola could evolve into a more deadly virus — or start spreading through the air. A study published Thursday alleviates these concerns.

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A Single Gene May Determine Why Some People Get So Sick With The Flu

Thursday, March 26, 2015

A single genetic mutation might decide who ends up in bed with the sniffles and who heads to the hospital, because it shuts down immune system molecules called interferons.

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Science Friday

Hr2: Liquid 3D Printer, The Dark Side of Physics, Malaria Tricks

Thursday, March 26, 2015

A speedy 3D printing technique, a roundup of physics research, and how the malaria parasite attracts mosquitoes.

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Science Friday

Hr1: Chemistry of Early Life, Climate Dance, Split Brains, Left to Right

Thursday, March 26, 2015

A look at conditions on the early Earth, how a choreographer and biologist are tackling the climate conversation, studying the left and right sides of the brain, and our preferences for pictures of moving objects.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Living Cancer: Precision Medicine

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Dr. Harold Varmus discusses the study of genomics in cancer treatment & The New York Times "Living With Cancer" columnist fields your calls on how to talk to people dealing with cancer.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

#SaveNYC; Living Cancer; Club Crawls

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Vanishing New York; NYS budget deadline nears; Dr. Harold Varmus; how to talk to people who have cancer; one woman's story of reconciliation & a crawl through NYC's nightlife history.

All Things Considered

'Super-Termite' Could Be Even More Destructive Than Parent Species

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

In South Florida, the world's two most destructive termite species could be mating because of climate change. Researchers say if the hybrids colonize, they could pose an even greater economic threat.

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PRI's The World

A crash in Europe lays bare some of aviation's myths

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Don't blame the autopilot for the latest aviation disaster, one pilot says: Humans still have more to do with flying high-tech jets than you think. That and other myths explain a lot about how ordinary people view the airline industry and the accidents it suffers.

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Mosquitoes Can Smell Inside Your Blood

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

When malaria parasites infect blood, they manufacture odor molecules that smell sweet to mosquitoes, scientists report. So how do these odors get from the bloodstream to the insects?

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