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Science

PRI's The World

‘Climate hubs’ may be key to fighting climate change. But, what are they?

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

President Barack Obama's climate policies have got a lot of attention recently. One initiative that has slipped under the radar, though, are so-called regional "climate hubs," designed to help farmers deal with global warming on a local level.

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All Things Considered

To 'Immunize' Kids Against Illiteracy, Break Out A Book In Infancy

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

The American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending that parents begin reading to their children early, even to newborns. Professor Susan Neuman, an expert on early literacy development, explains.

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What We Need Is A Moon With Rings

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Here are a couple of amazing videos showing what the Earth's sky would look like if some of the solar system's most familiar bodies orbited our planet at close range.

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The Takeaway

EPA Head: States Hold the Power

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

On Monday, the Supreme Court issued a ruling that largely affirms that the EPA has the power to regulate sources responsible for 83 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy says now it's up to states to do the rest of the dirty work.

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All Things Considered

Using A 3-D Version Of Rodin's Hands To Understand Anatomy

Monday, June 23, 2014

Dr. James Chang of Stanford University uses hands sculpted by Rodin, together with 3-D technology, to create an experience of augmented reality for his students and surgery trainees.

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Spineless, And Now Homeless: National Zoo Closes Animal Exhibit

Monday, June 23, 2014

Invertebrates make up about 99 percent of all species. But they're no longer being featured at the National Zoo after the exhibit was shuttered due to budget issues.

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Morning Edition

Scientists Observe Springtime Changes On One Of Saturn's Moons

Monday, June 23, 2014

On Titan, summer is almost three years away. But in a dark, placid ocean of natural gas, scientists have spotted something that could be the first inkling of springtime.

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Morning Edition

How Did The Meter Get Its Length?

Monday, June 23, 2014

The U.S. doesn't routinely use the metric system. The U.S. government definition of a foot is 0.3048 meters. But if the length of a foot is based on the meter, what's the length of the meter based on?

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Morning Edition

Hospitals To Pay Big Fines For Infections, Avoidable Injuries

Monday, June 23, 2014

Starting this fall, 25 percent of all U.S. hospitals — those with the worst records for infections and injuries — will lose 1 percent of every Medicare payment for a year.

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Man Floats Free In Hotel Corridor

Sunday, June 22, 2014

Hotel hallways are cramped and narrow, like cages. But Storyboard P won't be trapped. Watch this Brooklyn dancer float toward a fire extinguisher — beauty in tight places.

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Dust Clouds Big Bang Signal

Friday, June 20, 2014

A team claiming to have spied the earliest moments of the universe may have actually seen little more than galactic dust.

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Going Against The Grain: FDA Threatens Brewers' Feed For Farmers

Friday, June 20, 2014

Breweries have been providing farmers with free or discounted grain to feed their animals for centuries. But a proposed FDA rule intended to make food safer could disrupt that relationship.

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Stephanie Kwolek, Chemist Who Created Kevlar, Dies At 90

Friday, June 20, 2014

Kwolek, a DuPont scientist, invented the remarkable fibers — lightweight, flexible and five times stronger than steel — that are used around the world in bulletproof body armor.

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Radiolab

Wrong! Deconstructing 5 Famous History Stories

Friday, June 20, 2014

You don't question them. You don't doubt them. You hear them so often, you wouldn't know they are lies. Here are five historical "facts" that aren't true. Never were. And now you'll know.

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Wrong! Deconstructing 5 Famous History Stories

Friday, June 20, 2014

You don't question them. You don't doubt them. You hear them so often, you wouldn't know they are lies. Here are five historical "facts" that aren't true. Never were. And now you'll know.

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TED Radio Hour

Can You Learn To Spot A Liar?

Friday, June 20, 2014

We're surrounded by deception: in politics and pop culture, in the workplace and on social media. Pamela Meyer points out manners and cues that can help us suss out a lie.

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TED Radio Hour

Where's The Line Between Cheating A Little and Cheating A Lot?

Friday, June 20, 2014

Behavioral economist Dan Ariely explains the hidden reasons we think it's okay to cheat or steal. He says we're predictably irrational — and can be influenced in ways we don't even realize.

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TED Radio Hour

Does Technology Make Us More Honest?

Friday, June 20, 2014

Who hasn't sent a text message saying "I'm on my way" when it wasn't true? But some technology might actually force us to be more honest, says psychologist Jeff Hancock.

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Morning Edition

6 Decades Of Research Examines Prisoners Of War

Friday, June 20, 2014

The release of U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl prompted a firestorm of debate. We step away from that debate to look at what's been learned about the psychological effects of being captured in wartime

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Morning Edition

Scientists Keep A Careful Eye On The World Cup Ball

Friday, June 20, 2014

After a botched redesign in 2010 caused the ball to behave erratically, independent scientists have carefully studied the new ball.

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