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Science

The Takeaway

Why Environmental Crime Goes Unpunished

Monday, July 14, 2014

A new investigation finds that existing environmental regulations are rarely enforced — and environmental crimes are almost never prosecuted.

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The Takeaway

Why Is It So Hard to Test for Lyme Disease?

Monday, July 14, 2014

Summer is prime time for the tick-borne illness; some 300,000 people contract it every year. But a regulatory loophole means the market for Lyme disease tests is unreliable — and highly lucrative.

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Facing A Toxic Dump In South Africa, He Cleaned Up

Monday, July 14, 2014

Desmond D'Sa fought a landfill that took over a beautiful valley and sickened residents with its awful smell. He lost his job but won the battle — and the Goldman Environmental Prize.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Race, Class and Schools

Monday, July 14, 2014

On today’s show we’ll explore the re-emergence of school segregation 60 years after the Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. Sylvia Jukes Morris talks about the influence of politician and playwright Clare Boothe Luce. We'll find out about a legal battle over a Navy submarine detection system that uses high-intensity underwater sound—and drives whales to strand themselves on beaches. And, why golf is catching on in China and how it’s changing Chinese culture.

The Takeaway

Today's Takeaways: An Escalating Conflict, The World Cup's Legacy, and A New Look at Hemingway

Monday, July 14, 2014

1. Tensions Between Israel & Hamas Escalate | 2. Benghazi, Citigroup, and The DOJ's Curious Timing | 3. Why Is It So Hard to Test for Lyme Disease? | 4. The Legacy of the 2014 World Cup | 5. Hemingway's Grandson Restores Never-Seen Elements to "The Sun Also Rises"

All Things Considered

Mark Your Calendars: In A Year, We'll Arrive At Pluto

Sunday, July 13, 2014

It takes a long time to travel 3 billion miles. On July 14, 2015, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft will finally get a flyby glimpse of the dwarf planet, as part of a mission launched in 2006.

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Antares Blasts Off On ISS Supply Mission

Sunday, July 13, 2014

The rocket, built by commercial firm Orbital Sciences, carries an unmanned Cygnus capsule. It lifted off from a pad at Wallops Island, Va.

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Like Humans, Chimps Fall For Fashion Trends

Sunday, July 13, 2014

It's long been known that chimps learn from each other to make useful tools. Now researchers have seen them copy each other's "fashion statement," Dr. Katherine Cronin tells NPR's Arun Rath.

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Radiolab

The Most Astonishing Wave-Tracking Experiment Ever

Sunday, July 13, 2014

What if I told you that an ordinary-looking wave hitting your beach had traveled, intact, halfway across the planet? Would you believe me? Well, believe this.

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The Most Astonishing Wave-Tracking Experiment Ever

Sunday, July 13, 2014

What if I told you that an ordinary-looking wave hitting your beach had traveled, intact, halfway across the planet? Would you believe me? Well, believe this.

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All Things Considered

Well, I'll Be Un-Dammed: Colorado River (Briefly) Reached The Sea

Saturday, July 12, 2014

This spring, the river's final stretch flowed freely for the first time in 50 years. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to writer Rowan Jacobsen about his paddling trip down the temporarily-restored delta.

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The Moon Puts On A Triple Super Summer Spectacle

Saturday, July 12, 2014

This summer, the moon will reach "super" status — turning full at its closest point to the Earth — no fewer than three times. The first supermoon appears Saturday.

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WATCH: Giant Undulating Anchovy School

Friday, July 11, 2014

The largest school of the tiny fish seen in 30 years was spotted earlier this week off La Jolla, Calif.

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Elephant Featured In Film 'Alexander' Killed By Thai Poachers

Friday, July 11, 2014

The 50-year-old Asian elephant, named Phlai Khlao, was apparently poisoned before his tusks were hacked off. Thai authorities are questioning a suspect who is a former elephant handler.

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Morning Edition

Mississippi Child Thought Cured Of HIV Shows Signs Of Infection

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Scientists hoped the baby's apparent cure would lead to similar treatments in infants worldwide. But with the child still HIV-positive, some question the ethics of a large study in other children.

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PRI's The World

Feminist icon Germaine Greer is getting down in the dirt for a new challenge

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Writer and journalist Germaine Greer is an icon of the feminist movement. More than 40 years on from her famous book, "The Female Eunuch," Greer has taken up a new challenge: restoring a patch of ancient rainforest in her native Australia.

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Alcohol Test: Does Eating Yeast Keep You From Getting Drunk?

Thursday, July 10, 2014

When we read about a way to stave off intoxication in Esquire, we were dubious. So we bought a breathylzer, a few IPAs and tested out the kooky theory.

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Ducks Do It Differently, And Science Wants You To Know About It

Thursday, July 10, 2014

How should scientists respond to attacks painting their research as silly and wasteful? Commentator Barbara J. King talks with researchers who say its time to stand up for the value of basic science.

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Why HIV Spreads Less Easily In Heterosexual Couples

Thursday, July 10, 2014

People in heterosexual relationships are about 20 times less likely to pass HIV to their partners than homosexual men. Now scientists have found a clue to why this disparity exists.

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Science Friday

The Surprisingly Predictable Patterns of Random Choice

Thursday, July 10, 2014

In his new book, Rock Breaks Scissors, author William Poundstone decodes the patterns in big data, sports, and human behaviors.

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